Palmetto

State Park - Texas

Palmetto State Park is located in Gonzales County, Texas. The park is named for the dwarf palmetto (Sabal minor), which grows abundantly in the park. The San Marcos River runs through the park. The 4-acre (1.6 ha) Oxbow Lake, initially created by flood waters, is now independent of the river and is spring fed. There are many bogs throughout the park that are surrounded by dense vegetation, giving the park a jungle-like atmosphere.

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Trails Map of Palmetto State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Palmetto - Trails Map

Trails Map of Palmetto State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Official Texas Travel Map. Published by the Texas Department of Transportation.Texas - Travel Map

Official Texas Travel Map. Published by the Texas Department of Transportation.

brochures

Campground Map of Palmetto State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Palmetto - Map

Campground Map of Palmetto State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Trails Map of Palmetto State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Palmetto - Trails Map

Trails Map of Palmetto State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Interpretive Guide to Palmetto State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Palmetto - Interpretive Guide

Interpretive Guide to Palmetto State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Birds of Palmetto State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Palmetto - Birds

Birds of Palmetto State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Activity Book for Palmetto State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Palmetto - Activity Book

Activity Book for Palmetto State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Recipes for the Birds at Palmetto State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Palmetto - Recipes for the Birds

Recipes for the Birds at Palmetto State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Official Texas State Parks Guide. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Texas State - Official Texas State Parks Guide

Official Texas State Parks Guide. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Official Texas State Parks Guide (español). Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Texas State - Guía de Parques

Official Texas State Parks Guide (español). Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Palmetto SP https://tpwd.texas.gov/state-parks/palmetto https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palmetto_State_Park Palmetto State Park is located in Gonzales County, Texas. The park is named for the dwarf palmetto (Sabal minor), which grows abundantly in the park. The San Marcos River runs through the park. The 4-acre (1.6 ha) Oxbow Lake, initially created by flood waters, is now independent of the river and is spring fed. There are many bogs throughout the park that are surrounded by dense vegetation, giving the park a jungle-like atmosphere.
For assistance using this map, contact the park. Palmetto State Park To help Palmetto State Park protect its precious resources, please: • Stay on designated trails: Protect yourself, wildlife and vegetation. Post Office Ottine Cemetery FM 1586 OTTINE O r Rive arcos nM Sa xb o • Dead wood has life, too: Texas state parks prohibit firewood gathering. • Trash your trash: Keep this park natural. Pick up litter and put it in its place. 11 CR 250 • Cabin check-out is at 11 a.m. 40 39 38 27 29 31 33 35 36 37 • Excess Vehicle Fees are required at campsites with more than two licensed vehicles (including trailers). 26 28 30 32 34 Excess Vehicle Parking San • Day Use visitors are not permitted to picnic in numbered camp sites. r ive sR rco Ma • Vehicles must remain on the pavement at all times, including loading and unloading. • A maximum of 8 people allowed at each campsite. 1 3 5 7 2 4 6 8 18 16 14 12 10 19 17 15 13 11 u 11 9 1/8 Can mi. eb re a k Sp r Low Water Crossing sy p pS cu i. m 1/4 Rutledge Creek Mo s FM 2091 PARK ROAD ur San Marcos River Trail 1 1/4 mi. • CAMPFIRES are permitted only in fire rings provided at each site. • PUBLIC CONSUMPTION or display of any alcoholic beverage is prohibited. T Hwo U.S y9 . 0A Ottine Swamp Trail 1 mi. #TxStateParks #BetterOutside LEGEND Headquarters State Parks Store Watercraft Rental Restrooms Showers Water Only Sites Water and Electric Sites Dump Station Cabin (without bathroom) Group Camp Scenic Overlook Wheelchair Accessible Hiking Trail Interpretive Trail Picnic/Day Use Area CCC Pavilion Parking Palmetto Interpretive Trail 1/3 mi. Fishing Pier Mesquite Flats Trail 1 mi. Located on the Great Texas Coastal Birding Trail, Palmetto State Park is known as a “hot spot” for birding opportunities with over 240 species observed within the park’s boundaries. TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TTY) at (512) 389-8915 or by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989 or by email at accessibility@tpwd.texas.gov. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, please contact TPWD, 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, TX 78744, or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. © 2022 TPWD PWD MP P4505-049H (2/22) • DISCHARGING OF GRAY OR BLACK WASTEWATER, except at the dump station, is prohibited. N 24 23 22 21 20 Artesian Well & Pond Take advantage of scheduled programs: Activities include fishing clinics, guided tours and special events. With no containment dam upstream, the river at this point is wild, untamed and subject to intense flash flooding. Be prepared to evacuate the park during advance notice. • CHECK-OUT TIME is 12 p.m. RENEWAL is pending site availability. ke Become an active supporter: Join the Friends of Palmetto. Activities include fundraising, volunteer service and outreach opportunities. See park headquarters for more information. FLASH FLOODING CAUTION To U.S. Hwy 183 & Gonzales Oxbo w La 25 • Save natural sounds: Quiet times enforced 10 p.m. – 6 a.m. for everyone’s enjoyment. FM 1586 • VALID PARK PERMITS ARE REQUIRED on the windshield of each vehicle. Only guests with overnight permits may remain in the park after 10 p.m. w La ke Tra i l 3/4 mi . Litte Hill Baptist Church TexasStateParks.org/SocialMedia PLEASE NOTE Warm Springs Hospital and Elks Foundation PARK ROAD Park Headquarters Trail 1/4 mi. TexasStateParks.org/App To U.S. Hwy 183 & Scenic Overlook • Leash your pets: Keep them and others safe to protect wildlife. • Keep wildlife wild: Feeding wildlife is harmful and against the law. @PalmettoStatepark Many CCC structures still exist in the park. Please observe these with respect and admiration. This publication can be found at tpwd.texas.gov/spdest/parkinfo/maps/park_maps/ Texas State Parks Store Playground Fishing tackle, nature books, refreshments, ice, firewood, shirts, caps and one-of-a-kind gift items are available at the headquarters building. Paddleboard and kayak rentals are available by the fishing pier. Park Host PARK RESERVATIONS TexasStateParks.org ParquesDeTexas.org (512) 389-8900 Residence 78 Park Road 11 South Gonzales, TX 78629 (830) 672-3266 Proud Sponsor of Texas State Parks
For assistance using this map, contact the park. For a web version of the map text, visit our Trails Information page.
INTERPRETIVE GUIDE PALME LMET TTO S TAT E P PA A RK Palmetto State Park is a great place to enjoy the natural world around you. Go birding, take a hike or ride a bike on one of the trails, spend the night at one of our campsites or our cabin, or just explore! Any way you choose to experience the park, please enjoy it safely and responsibly! WELCOME STATE TO PARK! PALMETTO SHAKE OFF • Please be safe while swimming or paddling. • Properly dispose of all trash, it can hurt the wildlife. • Please hike on designated trails • Respect wildlife by keeping your dog on a leash. • Please park in designated areas. THE STRESS BY HIKING OUR NEARBY POINTS OF INTEREST TRAILS OR PLAYING IN THE Lockhart State Park 2012 State Park Road, Lockhart, TX 78644 WATERS Luling Lavender Fields 5 Arrow Land, Luling, TX 78648 OF OUR OXBOW LAKE. TAKE IN THE NATURAL BEAUTY OF THE FOREST AND THE LEGACY OF THE CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORPS (CCC), STILL VISIBLE ALL AROUND Gonzales Memorial Museum and County Jail Museum 414 St. Lawrence Street, Gonzales, TX 78629 Pioneer Village Living History Center 2122 North St. Joseph, Gonzales, TX 78629 Palmetto State Park 78 Park Road 11 South, Gonzales, TX 78629-5180 (830) 672-3266 • www.tpwd.texas.gov/palmetto/ YOU. ENJOY YOUR VISIT! © 2021 TPWD. PWD BR P4505-0049Q (7/21) TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TTY) at (512) 389-8915 or by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989 or by email at accessibility@tpwd.texas.gov. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, please contact TPWD, 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, TX 78744, or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. P A L M E T T O S T A T E P A R K Young men, many in their teens, worked hard building the park and learning life skills at the same time. Buildings like the Refectory and Water Tower are excellent examples of the amount of work, planning and skill that went into it. But other, much more subtle features, like the lake system, are fruits of their labor as well. THEIR LEGACY, YOUR PARK You’re in one of the quintessential parks built in the 1930s by the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) during the Great Depression. As you enjoy the park, think about those young men and the sacrifices they made to bring you this opportunity. That legacy has lived almost one hundred years and, with care, can live at least a hundred more. COME AND HIKE IT! I t won’t take long for you to see what a special place this is. Driving through will give you a brief glimpse of the beauty and diversity found here. Take a closer look by getting out on the trails to see the swamp, river bottom forest, and prairie habitats. The convergence of multiple ecozones in this area makes it unique. From the towering sycamores along the river to the stubby, dwarf palmettos in the swamp. Every turn gives you a look at different species, some found almost nowhere else in Texas. Water shapes the land here and has for millennia. The San Marcos River winds around and through the park, powerfully shaping its banks and bringing nutrients and seeds throughout the park when it floods. Look for stands of cottonwoods or sycamores as good examples of those floods. Up a little higher, in the swamps lie extinct mud boils and artesian wells that once supplied the water to the swamps and lakes. Sadly, with the lowering of the water table, we no longer get to see most of this naturally and must rely on our own wells and rainwater to keep the water flowing.
TEXAS PARKS AND WILDLIFE BIRDS OF PALMETTO S T A T E P A R K A FIELD CHECKLIST 2020 INTRODUCTION P almetto State Park is situated along the San Marcos River in Gonzales County, nestled in the Post Oak Savannah vegetation area of east-central Texas. The park is noted for its diverse flora and fauna, and is especially well known as one of central Texas’ premier birding spots. The park and immediate environs contain some of the westernmost nesting distribution for many eastern species, such as the Pileated Woodpecker, Kentucky Warbler and Prothonotary Warbler. Also reaching their westernmost distribution here are Flying Squirrels, the Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad, and numerous plants, mostly wetland species. Several plant communities occur within the park, including bottomland hardwoods of hackberry, ash, elm and oak along the river, wet grasslands and a spartina marsh with occasional palmetto-filled swales, an oxbow lake, and several lagoons fed by an artesian well. Short hiking trails provide access to most habitat types within the park. This checklist includes those species which have been sighted within the park or the immediate area of the park, such as along Park Road 11, the village of Ottine, the privately owned Salt Lake, or on the grounds of the Texas Rehabilitation Center and Elks Hospital. Some species that are included were seen during the annual Palmetto State Park Christmas Bird Count, which extends from the park entrance in a 15-mile radius. Throughout the years, many individuals have contributed information adding to our knowledge of the avifauna of this area. The compiler of this checklist edition is especially grateful to Rose Ann Rowlett, Ray Chancellor, Fred S. Webster, Jr., Ed Kutac, Jack Sunder, Charles Alexander, Willie Sekula, Greg Lasley, Pat Hartigan and Brush Freeman for the information they have provided. You can contribute to our knowledge of the birdlife of this area by reporting any unusual observations to the Natural Resource Program, Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, Texas 78744; or leave them at the park headquarters for forwarding. Nomenclature and organization of this checklist follow the A.O.U. Check-list of North American Birds, 7th edition, as currently supplemented. 1 Please help us protect the natural avian communities in our parks by refraining from using playback tapes of bird songs. Frequent use of these tapes disrupts normal avian activity patterns, disrupts essential territorial behavior and may lead to nest failure. Thank you for your cooperation. LEGEND A — Abundant: Present in such numbers and with such general distribution in proper habitat that many may be found in a given day. C — Common: Always present and in such numbers that one may expect to find several in a day. U — Uncommon: Normally present in habitat but one cannot be sure of finding one in a day. The bird referred to by the phrase “it should be there, but we might miss it” is “uncommon.” R — Rare: Definitely not expected. On the average it occurs only a few times a season or not at all. It is always a surprise to see one. O — Occasional: Occasionally seen. Occurs only once or twice a year on the average. V — Vagrant: Occurs only once every ten years on the average. # — Known to occur in the areas near the park but not recorded within the park checklist area to our knowledge. These species should be watched for, as they undoubtedly pass through or over the park on occasion. SP — March – May S — June – August F — September – November W — December – February 2 CHECKLIST SP S F ___ Black-bellied Whistling-Duck....................... R R W DUCKS & GEESE ___ Snow Goose ................................................. R R O ___ Ross’s Goose................................................ # ___ Greater White-fronted Goose........................ # ___ Canada Goose............................................... R R R ___ Wood Duck.................................................. U U U ___ Blue-winged Teal.......................................... U U R ___ Northern Shoveler ....................................... R R U ___ Gadwall........................................................ R R U ___ American Wigeon ........................................ R R U U ___ Mallard........................................................ U ___ Northern Pintail ........................................... R R U ___ Green-winged Teal........................................ U U C ___ Canvasback ................................................. R R U ___ Redhead....................................................... R R U ___ Ring-necked Duck ....................................... R R U ___ Greater Scaup .............................................. # ___ Lesser Scaup ............................................... U U R ___ Bufflehead.................................................... R ___ C
texas parks and wildlife Palmetto State Park A c t i v i t y B o o k includes pictures to color and a brief description of different animals that are found in palmetto state park. WOOD DUCK Aix sponsa (Warm-blooded) Lets learn about the Wood Duck Wood ducks are typically about 19 inches in length and have a wing span of 29 inches. The males have green heads and crest streaked with white, red eyes and base of bills, purple breasts, white throats, beige sides and bluish backs. Females are duller with bluish backs and a white teardrop shaped eye patch. They eat seeds, acorns, berries, grains and insects, making them omnivores. Wood ducks live in wooded swamps and bottomland forests in the eastern and western U.S. and Canada and western Mexico. They are year-round residents in East Texas, but northern populations migrate south for the winter. They choose old woodpecker holes or other natural cavities near water for their nests. They prefer nesting over water so that the babies have a soft landing when they leave the nest. Female wood ducks usually return to nest within a half-mile of where they were born. Baby wood ducks are covered with with down, can swim and find their own food soon after they are born. They can climb as high as 8 feet to get out of the nest cavity they were born in using a special tooth on their beak. What did we learn about the Wood Duck? 1. Is this animal a bird, mammal, reptile, insect or fish? 2. What is its common and scientific name? 3. What color is a male wood duck’s head? 4. What color is a female’s eye patch? 5. How wide is their wing span? 6. What do wood ducks eat? 1 CHANNEL CATFISH Ictalurus punctatus (Cold-blooded) Let’s learn about the Channel Catfish The channel catfish is a very popular food and game fish in Texas. They live in deep, slowmoving waters with gravel or sand bottom. They are found throughout Texas. They are mainly active at night and after it rains. They are blue-gray on their backs, light blue to silver along their sides, and have scattered dark-olive to black spots. They have barbels around their mouth, which are covered with taste buds. These are used to find food. When catfish are handled, people are often “stung” by the spines on their fins not by their barbels. They are omnivores, which means they eat worms, minnows, crayfish and plant material. The female lays the eggs and the male builds the nest. He will defend it from predators and takes care of the young fish (called fry) for about one week until they can live on their own. Younger females will lay about 4,000 eggs while an older female will lay up to 20,000 eggs. Predators such as humans, raccoons and birds prey on catfish. What did we learn about the Channel Catfish? 1. Is this animal a bird, mammal, reptile, insect or fish? 2. What is its common and scientific name? 3. How does it find food in the water? 4. Is it warm-blooded or cold-blooded? 5. Where is it found in Texas? 6. Is it a predator, prey or both? 2 RED-EARED SLIDER Trachemys scripta elegans (Cold-blooded) Let’s learn about the Red-eared Slider The red-eared slider is a medium sized turtle with a dark green oval shell, marked with yellow in younger turtles, green legs with thin yellow stripes and a green head with a red stripe behind the eye. They eat aquatic plants, small fish and decaying material. Sliders are cold-blooded and spend much of the day sunning on rocks and logs. The young turtles are eaten by a variety of predators including birds, raccoons, alligators and large fish. They bury themselves in loose soil or mud during the winter to escape the cold. Sliders are found in most permanent slow-moving water sources with mud bottoms in the eastern three-quarters of the state. Female turtles lay their eggs in holes that they dig in the ground and leave. Young turtles are born having to take care of themselves. Sliders have poor hearing but they are very sensitive to vibrations – this makes it difficult to sneak up on them. What did we learn about the Red-eared Slider? 1. Is this animal a bird, mammal, reptile, insect or fish? 2. What is its common and scientific name? 3. What do they eat? 4. Is it warm-blooded or cold-blooded? 5. Where does it live in Texas? 6. Where do they lay their eggs? 3 EASTERN BLUEBIRD Sialia sialis (Warm-blooded) Let’s learn about the Eastern Bluebird The eastern bluebird is among one of the most popular birds in this area. The bird has a shiny blue color on its back, a rich red color on its throat and chest and a white belly. This bird occurs commonly in the eastern two-thirds of Texas and rarely in the west. Bluebirds prefer open farmland with scattered trees, orchards and even yards and parks. They will nest in cavities and old woodpecker holes in trees. They will also use nesting boxes if the entrance hole and box are the correct size. Their diet consists of insects, until cooler months when it eats berries and other fruits. The eastern bluebird has suffered a drastic population decline
TEXAS PARKS AND WILDLIFE Recp i es for the Birds � PALMETTO STATE PARK • GONZALES, TEXAS Rec i pes fo r t he B i rds The following recipes have something special for all the guests who will visit your feeders. Your visitors will be delighted with their favorite menus, no matter the season. Ingredients Information Seeds & Grains The following can be bought at your local feed stores: mixed wild bird seed, millet, cracked corn, peanut hearts, thistle and sunflower seeds. Grit Grit is necessary to grind and digest the coarse foods that birds eat. You can purchase commercial bird gravel, or if available, coarse beach sand will serve the purpose. Raw Beef Suet Suet provides energy and warmth during the cold months. When prepar­ ing suet, to make a smoother liquid, put it through a meat grinder before melting. To make a solid suet cake, reheat. For those concerned about spoilage of beef suet in our summer heat, a reasonable alternative is a mixture of equal portions of shortening and peanut butter. Kitchen Scraps Keep cake, doughnuts, pie crust or anything with sugar in a covered con­ tainer. Use a separate container for crusts and stale breads. Granola Treat One cup of each of the following: wheat germ, peanut hearts, white millet, raisins, crushed dog bones and sunflower seeds. Heat 1/2 cup honey separately. Add to dry mixture. Mix well, bake at 375° for ten minutes. Refrigerate. Mixture can be fed as granola treat or mixed with suet. 1 Rec i pes fo r t he B i rds 2 Nesting Season While nesting, birds will not need to depend on humans for food. Providing them with nesting materials and housing will entice visitors. Houses should be made out of natural materials, well ventilated and hung on the shady sides of trees. Cut nesting materials such as wool, twine and string into 3-inch lengths and put into your suet containers. String Foods se ee h c rn co p po ins s i ra s be u c pe an ut si n sh ell do ug hn ut s dr ied fru it Rec i pes fo r t he B i rds 3 Feeding Station A feeding station is any area that has a bird feeder set up. These may consist of a platform mounted on a pole, commercial plastic feeders or something as simple as feed scattered on the ground. Feeding stations can be designed to attract certain types of birds or a wide variety of feathered friends. Seed Dispensers Use at least two seed dispensers, one for wild bird seed mix and one for sunflower seed. If House Sparrows are a problem, mixes that contain millet should be avoided. If possible, locate these near brush or trees to provide a place to perch and preen. Once you begin feeding, it is impor­ tant that you continue through the winter. Check your feeders early in the mornings and again before dusk. Rec i pes fo r t he B i rds 4 Ground Feeders To complete your feeding station, be sure that you provide at least two ground feeders. These can be wooden or plastic, approximately 3 inches deep with drain holes in the bottom. Add parakeet gravel or clean sand as needed to provide grit. Do this espe­ cially after a rain. Suet Containers All your feathered guests will eat suet during the cold weather to provide energy and warmth. You should pro­ vide several types of containers. Small clinging birds use netted bags and wire baskets. Woodpeckers prefer logs with holes at various points, and coconut shells are used by all. Rec i pes fo r t he B i rds 5 Winter Warmth Your guests are creatures of habit. Once you begin feeding, it is important to continue through the winter. Check your feeders at least twice a day. Ideal times are very early morn­ ing and again before dusk. Birds will take shelter for the night and do not feed again until dawn. Return of Spring By mid-March there will probably be fewer birds at your feeders. Sprouts, insects and worms are pushing through the warm moist ground. It is now time to stop suet feeding and continue seed feeding until the end of April. Summertime Summer season provides all the natural food that your yard guests need. They thrive on insects, weed seeds and grains. However, water is essential. A birdbath can be a wonderful addition to your yard. For an added treat quarter fresh fruit (leave the skin on) and either hang from branches or put on feeding trays. Soon the migration will begin and the resident guests will return to your feeders. Rec i pes fo r t he B i rds 6 Hummingbird Punch � 1 cup sugar 4 cups water Boil four cups water and remove from heat. Add sugar and stir until disolved. Let cool and feed. Store remaining syrup in covered container in refrigerator for up to two weeks. Boiling water is not necessary but may extend the shelf life of the syrup. TIPS: • Red food coloring should not be used. Feeders have enough color on them to attract the birds. • Make sure your feeders are clean. • Hang feeders in a shady area near windows or around patio. Your guests will provide many happy memories. • Keep feeders active year-round. Waxwing Wedge Raw beef suet 1 large apple 2
-Official- FACILITIES Get the Mobile App: MAPS ACTIVITIES TexasStateParks.org/app T O Y O T A T U N D R A The Toyota Tundra is built to explore the great outdoors. No matter what the weekend throws at you, your Tundra takes it on with ease. | toyota.com/tundra Official Vehicle of the Texas Parks & Wildlife Foundation CONTENTS 4 100 Years of Texas Parks 6 Parks Near You 8 90 Checklist DIRECTORY TEXAS PARKS AND WILDLIFE DEPARTMENT 52 68 20 38 60 30 84 68 David Yoskowitz, Ph.D. Executive Director Rodney Franklin State Parks Director Mischelle Diaz Communications Director TPW COMMISSION Arch “Beaver” Aplin, III, Chairman Lake Jackson Dick Scott, Vice-Chairman Wimberley James E. Abell Kilgore Oliver J. Bell Cleveland Paul L. Foster El Paso Anna B. Galo Laredo Jeffery D. Hildebrand Houston Robert L. “Bobby” Patton, Jr. Fort Worth Travis B. “Blake” Rowling Dallas T. Dan Friedkin, Chairman-Emeritus Houston Lee Marshall Bass, Chairman-Emeritus Fort Worth 52 Panhandle Plains 48 State Parks Map Special thanks to Toyota and advertisers, whose generous support made this guide possible. Texas State Parks is a division of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. Cover illustration: Brad Woodard, bravethewoods.com Texas State Parks Official Guide, Nineteenth Edition © TPWD PWD BK P4000-000A (3/23) TPWD receives funds from DHS and USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination based on race, color, religion, national origin (including limited English proficiency), disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, visit tpwd.texas. gov/nondiscrimination or call (512) 389-4800 for information on filing a complaint. To obtain information in an alternative format, contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TTY) at (512) 389-8915, by Relay Texas at 7-1-1, (800) 735-2989, or by email at accessibility@tpwd.texas.gov. If you speak a language other than English and need assistance, email lep@tpwd.texas.gov. You can also contact Department of the Interior Office of Diversity, Inclusion, and Civil Rights, 1849 C Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20240, and/or U.S. Department of Homeland Security Office for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties (CRCL), Mail Stop #0190 2707, Martin Luther King, Jr. Ave., S.E. Washington, D.C. 20528. In accordance with Texas State Depository Law, this publication is available at the Texas State Publications Clearinghouse and/or Texas Depository Libraries. WELCOME from Rodney Franklin, State Parks Director This year is very special for Texas State Parks: We are celebrating our 100-year anniversary in 2023. More and more Texans are discovering the beauty of State Parks and exploring the outdoors in new and adventurous ways. Our teams across the state are incredibly excited to welcome outdoor enthusiasts, especially those who have yet to discover what our parks have to offer. The variety of Texas’ lands is unmatched; from the mountains of west Texas to the Gulf shores, the Texas State Park system celebrates and preserves the natural and cultural treasures that make Texas such a special place. The 640,000-plus acres that make up the state park system are nearly as diverse as the people of Texas. Since 1923, our mission has been to help connect our visitors with the outdoors. As we honor those who have come before us, I invite a new generation to be a part of the story of the lands that connect us all. There is more to enjoy in our parks than you know, so please join us in our celebrations and activities. Every day we look for new and better ways to ensure your state parks are welcoming to every Texan, regardless of their background or experience being outside. I hope you’ll visit soon and often, while bringing your friends and family along. YOU are a natural and we’re looking forward to celebrating the 100-year anniversary of state parks with you! WHAT’S NEW IN STATE PARKS Galveston Island State Park reopened the beachside of the park with a new headquarters, campsites, restrooms, and more. Bastrop State Park unveiled an extensive new group of trails, the “Tree Army Trails,” many of which are ADA-accessible. Improvements and major repairs are planned for Indian Lodge, Tyler, Inks Lake, Cedar Hill, South Llano River, Eisenhower and several other state parks All-terrain “GRIT” wheelchairs are now available at 10 parks with more adaptive equipment on the way to help people of all abilities experience Texas State Parks. Learn more about our accessibility efforts, page 14. More information: TexasStateParks.org/whatsnew 100 Years of Texas Parks The crown jewels of Texas road trips started as an unfunded wish list before the Depression. Back in 1923, Governor Pat Neff realized rising numbers of new car travelers needed places to camp overnight on multi-day trips. Neff convinced the state legislature to create a six-member State Parks Board, half men, half women. Isabella, the Governor’s mother, and her family donated acreage on the Leon
Guía de Parques INSTALACIONES Descarga la Aplicacíon Móvil MAPAS ACTIVIDADES texasstateparks.org/app ¡Los niños entran gratis! La entrada es gratis para los niños de 12 años y menores. Encuentra un parque: parquesdetexas.org Contenido Estero Llano Grande SP 2 Actividades y Programas 4 Parques Cercanos 6 Lugares para Quedarse 8 Tarifas y Pases 9 Directorio 10 Mapa de Parques 18 Instalaciones y Actividades BIENVENIDO Rodney Franklin, Director de Parques Texas tiene algunas de las tierras públicas más diversas del país, con una gran riqueza natural y cultural. La vida silvestre está por todas partes, los paisajes florecen con belleza, y la historia es abundante. Sus parques estatales son parte del legado que nos enorgullece. La gente de Texas ayuda a asegurar ese legado para las generaciones futuras al visitar y ser voluntarios. ¡Gracias! Estos más de 630,000 acres exhiben algunos de los grandes tesoros del estado. Los parques nos ayudan a crear recuerdos con la familia y a encontrar consuelo en la naturaleza. Los parques fortalecen las economías locales y unen a las comunidades. Sobre todo, los parques nos permiten pasar tiempo al aire libre para recargar energías, estar saludables y relajarnos a nuestra manera. Les invito a disfrutar de sus parques estatales, explorando lo mejor de Texas con amigos y familia. Los parques están aquí para todos. Nos pertenecen a todos. ¡Visítelos, diviértase y ayude a protegerlos para siempre! Foto de portada: Estero Llano State Park, Chase Fountain © 2021 TPWD PWD BK P4000-000A (5/21) TPWD recibe fondos del Servicio de Pesca y Vida Silvestre de EE.UU. (USFWS por sus siglas en ingles). TPWD prohíbe la discriminación por raza, color, religión, nacionalidad de origen, discapacidad, edad y género, conforme la ley estatal y federal. Para solicitar un acomodo especial u obtener información en un formato alternativo, por favor contacte a TPWD en un Teléfono de Texto (TTY) al (512) 3898915 ó por medio de “Relay Texas” al 7-1-1 ó (800) 735-2989 ó por email a accessibility@tpwd.texas.gov. Si usted cree que TPWD ha discriminado en su contra, favor de comunicarse con TPWD, 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, TX 78744, o con el Servicio de Pesca y Vida Silvestre de EE.UU., Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. De acuerdo con la Ley de Depósito del Estado de Texas, esta publicación está disponible en el centro de Distribución de Publicaciones del Estado de Texas y/o las Bibliotecas de Depósito de Texas. ACTIVIDADES Y PROGRAMAS ¿Qué puedo hacer en los parques estatales? ¡Disfruta de un día de campo, visita un sitio histórico o elige entre muchas otras opciones! Bicicletas Pedalea a lo largo de los parques a cualquier velocidad, en cualquier estilo, con cualquier grupo. Elige las rutas, el tipo de terreno y las distancias que cumplan con tu zona de confort. Caminatas Empieza con un circuito más corto, avanza a terrenos más difíciles o únete a una caminata guiada. Pescar Puedes pescar sin licencia en tantos como 70 parques estatales. Muchos parques ofrecen equipo para pescar a manera de préstamo y eventos especiales para aprender a pescar. Barcos Renta canoas y kayacs y explora uno de los senderos acuáticos en Texas. Nadar Animales Silvestres Acampar Descubre aves, mamíferos y plantas que tienen su hogar en Texas. Muchos parques tienen señalamientos y listados que te ayudan a aprender más. Encuentra un lugar que cumpla con lo que quieres. Prueba nuevas recetas, comparte historias favoritas y disfruta de las estrellas. 2 Más información y reservaciones: parquesdetexas.org Escape del calor en arroyos, ríos, lagos, manantiales, piletas y playas del mar. Tu seguridad en el agua es muy importante. Lleva el chaleco salvavidas. Aprende a nadar. Guarda a los niños. (512) 389-8900 ¡Pregunta en tu parque cuáles están disponibles! Los niños de 12 años y menores entran GRATIS Cielos Estrellados Escapa de las luces de la ciudad y goza de maravillosas vistas del cielo que no encontrarás en ninguna otra parte. Ven a una fiesta de estrellas o toma una excursión de constelaciones auto-guiada. Familias en la Naturaleza Elige un taller o diseña tu propia aventura. ¡Monta una tienda de campaña, cocina al exterior, prende una fogata y juega al exterior! Nosotros te Toma una publicación gratuita de actividades o pregunta por los paquetes gratuitos con los parques proporcionamos todo el equipo. No es necesario tener experiencia. participantes. Usa los binoculares, lupas, libros de bosquejos y libros de guías para explorar el parque. Mochilas para Exploradores Soldados Búfalo de Texas Descubre la historia con cuentos, vestuarios y herramientas. Sigue la pista de un animal, pesca con caña, cocina sobre una fogata, visita los fuertes y más. Adéntrate en las historias de vida de aquellos que sirvieron valientemente en los primeros regimientos Áfrico-Americanos de las Fuerzas Armadas. ! Seguridad en el Parque Ten cuidado con el agua Pre

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