Longhorn Cavern

State Park - Texas

Longhorn Cavern State Park is located in Burnet County, Texas. The park is named for Longhorn Cavern, a limestone cave formed by the cutting action of an underground river that receded thousands of years ago. Before the cave became a tourist attraction, it was used over the years by Indians, Confederate soldiers and outlaws, including outlaw Sam Bass.

location

maps

Official Texas Travel Map. Published by the Texas Department of Transportation.Texas - Travel Map

Official Texas Travel Map. Published by the Texas Department of Transportation.

brochures

Campground Map of Longhorn Cavern State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Longhorn Cavern - Map

Campground Map of Longhorn Cavern State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Interpretive Guide of Longhorn Cavern State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Longhorn Cavern - Interpretive Trail Guide

Interpretive Guide of Longhorn Cavern State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Birds at Longhorn Cavern State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Longhorn Cavern - Birds

Birds at Longhorn Cavern State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Official Texas State Parks Guide. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Texas State - Official Texas State Parks Guide

Official Texas State Parks Guide. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Official Texas State Parks Guide (español). Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Texas State - Guía de Parques

Official Texas State Parks Guide (español). Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Longhorn Cavern SP https://tpwd.texas.gov/state-parks/longhorn-cavern https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Longhorn_Cavern_State_Park Longhorn Cavern State Park is located in Burnet County, Texas. The park is named for Longhorn Cavern, a limestone cave formed by the cutting action of an underground river that receded thousands of years ago. Before the cave became a tourist attraction, it was used over the years by Indians, Confederate soldiers and outlaws, including outlaw Sam Bass.
Longhorn Cavern #TxStateParks State Park #BetterOutside @TPWDparks @texasparkswildlife /texasparksandwildlife TexasStateParks.org/App LEGEND PLEASE NOTE N • Day use park only. • Public consumption or display of an open container of any alcoholic beverage is prohibited. • Pets must be kept on a six-foot leash. Please pick up after them. Visitor Center/ Tour Tickets Cavern Entrance Tr ai l Restrooms r tu e B kbo ac a idge N ne R Comanche Spur Visitor Center Ba on c kb nce Entra Backbone R i d g e e dg Ri e t Na e ur il Tra r eT tur a N ail Pedestrian Crosswalk Wildflo e w W ild ay f lo we r W CCC Cabin Ka rs t Observation Tower Park Host Warbler Walk 0.08 mile D is cove r a Tr il CCC Observation Tower Wildflower Way 0.10 mile Comanche Spur 0.04 mile Texas State Parks Store T-shirts, caps and one-of-a-kind gift items are available at the Visitor Center building. 6211 Park Road 4 South Burnet, TX 78611 (512) 715-9000 TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TDD) at (512) 389-8915 or by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, please contact TPWD or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. © 2019 TPWD PWD MP P4507-020A (2/19) Parking Karst Discovery Trail 0.60 mile y Service Road Picnic Area Backbone Ridge Nature Trail 0.35 mile a rW y it Hiking Trail K ar st Exit Ex Snack Bar ry Trail scove Di CCC Administration Building State Park Store Warbler Walk Texas State Parks is a division of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. PARK RESERVATIONS TexasStateParks.org ParquesDeTexas.org (512) 389-8900 Proud Sponsor of Texas State Parks
CREATING PARKS With the onset of the Great Depression in the 1930s, the nation suffered from debilitating unemployment levels. With more than half the young men under 25 years of age out of work, President Franklin Roosevelt created the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) to provide employment. The program put young men to work developing state and national parks, as well as rehabilitating forests and controlling soil erosion. INTERPRETIVE GUIDE INKS LAKE STATE PARK AND ENJOY BOTH PARKS Inks Lake, a small pass-through lake, is considered the jewel of the Highland Lakes Chain. Typically, Inks Lake fluctuates minimally because of the small volume of water it holds in comparison to other Highland Lakes. This usually allows recreation activities in the park, such as swimming, boating and fishing, to continue unaffected by drought conditions. LONGHORN CAVERN STATE PARK CONNECTED BY A SHARED HISTORY, Beat the heat with a visit to Longhorn Cavern State Park— the cave is as cool as 68 degrees year-round! The park offers guided tours lasting about 11/2 hours for the 1.1-mile round trip. Low-heeled shoes with rubber soles are recommended. INKS LAKE AND LONGHORN CAVERN Inks Lake State Park 3630 Park Road 4 West, Burnet, TX 78611 (512) 793-2223 • www.tpwd.texas.gov/inks/ PREHISTORIC OCCUPATION DATING Longhorn Cavern State Park 6211 Park Road 4 South, Burnet, TX 78611 (512) 715-9000 • www.visitlonghorncavern.com WATER RESOURCES. HOWEVER, THEIR STATE PARKS BOAST SPECTACULAR GEOLOGICAL FEATURES, EVIDENCE OF TO MORE THAN 8,000 YEARS AGO, AND STRONG CONNECTIONS TO STORIES DON’T REALLY WEAVE TOGETHER UNTIL THE 1930s AND THE GREAT DEPRESSION. BOTH PARKS OWE THEIR EXISTENCE TO THE NEW Proud Sponsor of Texas Parks and Wildlife Programs © 2018 TPWD. PWD BR P4507-015U (7/18) In accordance with Texas State Depository Law, this publication is available at the Texas State Publications Clearinghouse and/or Texas Depository Libraries. TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TDD) at (512) 389-8915 or by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, please contact TPWD or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. Texas State Parks is a division of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. Between 1934 and 1942, the young men of CCC Company 854 labored to create two new state parks here. At Longhorn Cavern, they removed debris from the cavern, and built trails, an administration building, an observation tower and a lighting system. The beginning of World War II cut short plans for Inks Lake State Park. Despite this, the CCC constructed a boat house and road system with dozens of stone culverts. DEAL WORK PROGRAMS OF THAT TRYING TIME IN AMERICAN HISTORY. The men of CCC Company 854 cleared 30,000 cubic yards of mud and debris from Longhorn Cavern by hand. That’s equal to about 3,000 dump truck loads! I N K S L A K E S T A T E P A R K A N D L O N G H O R N C A V E R N S T A T E P A R K L ONG H OR N C A VER N GNEISS ISLANDS AND VERNAL POOLS At Inks Lake, the pink rock outcrops jutting up through the surrounding limestone are Valley Spring Gneiss (pronounced “nice”), a pinkish granite-like metamorphic rock formed from recrystallized sedimentary rocks. T he geologic history of Longhorn Cavern is complex, and the theories don’t all agree. Around 500 million years ago, a shallow tropical sea covered this area. The sea floor, covered with sediments and the remains of sea creatures, eventually turned into the limestone beneath your feet. Between 280 and 300 million years ago, mountain-building forces shifted under Central Texas in an event called the “Llano Uplift.” During this upheaval, faults and fractures formed in the flat-lying limestone. Later, an underground river system—dissolving and flowing through the limestone—formed Longhorn Cavern. Few caverns in the United States were formed in this way, making Longhorn Cavern unique. During the last million years, the water deposited a thick layer of mud and debris in the cave. Early visitors were restricted to a small area due to this debris. Some of the earliest visitors were the area’s prehistoric peoples, who used parts of the cave for shelter. Anglo settlers found the cavern in the mid-1800s and began mining bat guano that was used in manufacturing gun powder during the Civil War. Tourists began visiting the cave in the 1870s, attracted by the desire to learn and by the novelty of the cavern. For a short time in the 1930s, the cavern included a dance hall. This underground nightclub featured bands and live radio broadcasts. Now, visitors can discover the stories the caver
TEXAS PARKS AND WILDLIFE BIRDS OF INKS LAKE AND LONGHORN CAVERN S T A T E P A R K S A FIELD CHECKLIST 2015 INTRODUCTION I nks Lake State Park is situated in Burnet County along the east side of Inks Lake on a stretch of the Colorado River between Buchanan Dam and Wirtz Dam. The state park consists of 1,200 acres and contains about three miles of shoreline. The woodlands in the upland areas of the park are dominated by Plateau live oak, Ashe juniper, cedar elm, and post oak. Along the shoreline sycamore, willows, and box elders can be found. In general, the park is characterized by a mosaic of shrublands typical of the Edwards Plateau with abundant Texas persimmon interspersed with areas that are more open grassland with scattered mesquite and other shrubs. Just south of Inks Lake State Park, the Federal Fish Hatchery can be reached from Park Road 4. There is a small picnic area along the river bank and the hatchery ponds attract a great many ducks in the winter. Check the visitor center for their checklist. Continuing south along Park Road 4 another two miles, you will reach Longhorn Cavern State Park. The woodland there is more typical of the Hill Country with a mixed oaks and junipers. Here there are many large Plateau live oaks with smaller numbers of Texas oak and other hardwoods. There are many areas along the edges of openings in the woodland where a brushy understory is present. The limestone of Longhorn Cavern on the backbone ridge contrasts sharply with the gneiss and granite bedrock of the remainder of the checklist area. Notice particularly the absence of Texas oak on nonlimestone derived soils. This has an effect on the types of birds present as well and a good example of this is the presence of Golden-cheeked Warblers at Longhorn Cavern State Park. This checklist includes all species known to occur within Inks Lake State Park. Checklist nomenclature and organization follow the A.O.U. Check-list of North American Birds (7th Edition, 1998 as currently supplemented). This checklist was compiled by Ursula Kramer and updated by Sherry Bixler, and is based in part on previous editions of the checklist and volunteer efforts within the park. Because we are interested in maintaining and revising this checklist, the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department asks visitors to help by sharing new and unusual sightings and/or comments on the status of the park’s birdlife. Please report any new sightings to the park interpreter. 1 Please help us protect the natural avian communities in our parks by refraining from using playback tapes of bird songs. Frequent use of these tapes disrupts essential territorial behavior and may lead to nest failure. Thank you for your cooperation. LEGEND Seasons Sp = spring (March – May) S = summer (June – July) F = fall (August – November) W = winter (December – February) Abundance A = Abundant, always present and observed, expect large numbers in proper habitat and season C = Common, always encountered in proper habitat and season, numbers may vary from low to high U = Uncommon, usually present in proper habitat and season but may be overlooked, never common or abundant R = Rare, seldom recorded, not expected each season as designated, may not be recorded each year X = Accidental, may be observed only once in ten years or more, not expected 2 CHECKLIST Sp S F W ___ Greater White-fronted Goose...................... R R ___ Snow Goose................................................ X ___ Canada Goose............................................. U R U C U ___ Gadwall ..................................................... U U U ___ American Wigeon....................................... U U U ___ Wood Duck................................................. C C ___ Mallard ...................................................... R R C C ___ Blue-winged Teal........................................ R R U U ___ Northern Shoveler...................................... R R U U ___ Green-winged Teal...................................... C C C ___ Canvasback................................................. U U U ___ Redhead..................................................... U U U ___ Ring-necked Duck...................................... R R R ___ Lesser Scaup............................................... C C C ___ Long-tailed Duck........................................ R ___ Common Goldeneye.................................... R ___ Bufflehead.................................................. C C C ___ Hooded Merganser..................................... R R U ___ Red-breasted Merganser ........................... R ___ Ruddy Duck................................................ U R U C ___ Northern Bobwhite..................................... R R R R ___ Wild Turkey................................................ U U U U U U ___ Common Loon............................................ U ___ Least Grebe..
-Official- FACILITIES Get the Mobile App: MAPS ACTIVITIES TexasStateParks.org/app T O Y O T A T U N D R A The Toyota Tundra is built to explore the great outdoors. No matter what the weekend throws at you, your Tundra takes it on with ease. | toyota.com/tundra Official Vehicle of the Texas Parks & Wildlife Foundation CONTENTS 4 100 Years of Texas Parks 6 Parks Near You 8 90 Checklist DIRECTORY TEXAS PARKS AND WILDLIFE DEPARTMENT 52 68 20 38 60 30 84 68 David Yoskowitz, Ph.D. Executive Director Rodney Franklin State Parks Director Mischelle Diaz Communications Director TPW COMMISSION Arch “Beaver” Aplin, III, Chairman Lake Jackson Dick Scott, Vice-Chairman Wimberley James E. Abell Kilgore Oliver J. Bell Cleveland Paul L. Foster El Paso Anna B. Galo Laredo Jeffery D. Hildebrand Houston Robert L. “Bobby” Patton, Jr. Fort Worth Travis B. “Blake” Rowling Dallas T. Dan Friedkin, Chairman-Emeritus Houston Lee Marshall Bass, Chairman-Emeritus Fort Worth 52 Panhandle Plains 48 State Parks Map Special thanks to Toyota and advertisers, whose generous support made this guide possible. Texas State Parks is a division of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. Cover illustration: Brad Woodard, bravethewoods.com Texas State Parks Official Guide, Nineteenth Edition © TPWD PWD BK P4000-000A (3/23) TPWD receives funds from DHS and USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination based on race, color, religion, national origin (including limited English proficiency), disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, visit tpwd.texas. gov/nondiscrimination or call (512) 389-4800 for information on filing a complaint. To obtain information in an alternative format, contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TTY) at (512) 389-8915, by Relay Texas at 7-1-1, (800) 735-2989, or by email at accessibility@tpwd.texas.gov. If you speak a language other than English and need assistance, email lep@tpwd.texas.gov. You can also contact Department of the Interior Office of Diversity, Inclusion, and Civil Rights, 1849 C Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20240, and/or U.S. Department of Homeland Security Office for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties (CRCL), Mail Stop #0190 2707, Martin Luther King, Jr. Ave., S.E. Washington, D.C. 20528. In accordance with Texas State Depository Law, this publication is available at the Texas State Publications Clearinghouse and/or Texas Depository Libraries. WELCOME from Rodney Franklin, State Parks Director This year is very special for Texas State Parks: We are celebrating our 100-year anniversary in 2023. More and more Texans are discovering the beauty of State Parks and exploring the outdoors in new and adventurous ways. Our teams across the state are incredibly excited to welcome outdoor enthusiasts, especially those who have yet to discover what our parks have to offer. The variety of Texas’ lands is unmatched; from the mountains of west Texas to the Gulf shores, the Texas State Park system celebrates and preserves the natural and cultural treasures that make Texas such a special place. The 640,000-plus acres that make up the state park system are nearly as diverse as the people of Texas. Since 1923, our mission has been to help connect our visitors with the outdoors. As we honor those who have come before us, I invite a new generation to be a part of the story of the lands that connect us all. There is more to enjoy in our parks than you know, so please join us in our celebrations and activities. Every day we look for new and better ways to ensure your state parks are welcoming to every Texan, regardless of their background or experience being outside. I hope you’ll visit soon and often, while bringing your friends and family along. YOU are a natural and we’re looking forward to celebrating the 100-year anniversary of state parks with you! WHAT’S NEW IN STATE PARKS Galveston Island State Park reopened the beachside of the park with a new headquarters, campsites, restrooms, and more. Bastrop State Park unveiled an extensive new group of trails, the “Tree Army Trails,” many of which are ADA-accessible. Improvements and major repairs are planned for Indian Lodge, Tyler, Inks Lake, Cedar Hill, South Llano River, Eisenhower and several other state parks All-terrain “GRIT” wheelchairs are now available at 10 parks with more adaptive equipment on the way to help people of all abilities experience Texas State Parks. Learn more about our accessibility efforts, page 14. More information: TexasStateParks.org/whatsnew 100 Years of Texas Parks The crown jewels of Texas road trips started as an unfunded wish list before the Depression. Back in 1923, Governor Pat Neff realized rising numbers of new car travelers needed places to camp overnight on multi-day trips. Neff convinced the state legislature to create a six-member State Parks Board, half men, half women. Isabella, the Governor’s mother, and her family donated acreage on the Leon
Guía de Parques INSTALACIONES Descarga la Aplicacíon Móvil MAPAS ACTIVIDADES texasstateparks.org/app ¡Los niños entran gratis! La entrada es gratis para los niños de 12 años y menores. Encuentra un parque: parquesdetexas.org Contenido Estero Llano Grande SP 2 Actividades y Programas 4 Parques Cercanos 6 Lugares para Quedarse 8 Tarifas y Pases 9 Directorio 10 Mapa de Parques 18 Instalaciones y Actividades BIENVENIDO Rodney Franklin, Director de Parques Texas tiene algunas de las tierras públicas más diversas del país, con una gran riqueza natural y cultural. La vida silvestre está por todas partes, los paisajes florecen con belleza, y la historia es abundante. Sus parques estatales son parte del legado que nos enorgullece. La gente de Texas ayuda a asegurar ese legado para las generaciones futuras al visitar y ser voluntarios. ¡Gracias! Estos más de 630,000 acres exhiben algunos de los grandes tesoros del estado. Los parques nos ayudan a crear recuerdos con la familia y a encontrar consuelo en la naturaleza. Los parques fortalecen las economías locales y unen a las comunidades. Sobre todo, los parques nos permiten pasar tiempo al aire libre para recargar energías, estar saludables y relajarnos a nuestra manera. Les invito a disfrutar de sus parques estatales, explorando lo mejor de Texas con amigos y familia. Los parques están aquí para todos. Nos pertenecen a todos. ¡Visítelos, diviértase y ayude a protegerlos para siempre! Foto de portada: Estero Llano State Park, Chase Fountain © 2021 TPWD PWD BK P4000-000A (5/21) TPWD recibe fondos del Servicio de Pesca y Vida Silvestre de EE.UU. (USFWS por sus siglas en ingles). TPWD prohíbe la discriminación por raza, color, religión, nacionalidad de origen, discapacidad, edad y género, conforme la ley estatal y federal. Para solicitar un acomodo especial u obtener información en un formato alternativo, por favor contacte a TPWD en un Teléfono de Texto (TTY) al (512) 3898915 ó por medio de “Relay Texas” al 7-1-1 ó (800) 735-2989 ó por email a accessibility@tpwd.texas.gov. Si usted cree que TPWD ha discriminado en su contra, favor de comunicarse con TPWD, 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, TX 78744, o con el Servicio de Pesca y Vida Silvestre de EE.UU., Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. De acuerdo con la Ley de Depósito del Estado de Texas, esta publicación está disponible en el centro de Distribución de Publicaciones del Estado de Texas y/o las Bibliotecas de Depósito de Texas. ACTIVIDADES Y PROGRAMAS ¿Qué puedo hacer en los parques estatales? ¡Disfruta de un día de campo, visita un sitio histórico o elige entre muchas otras opciones! Bicicletas Pedalea a lo largo de los parques a cualquier velocidad, en cualquier estilo, con cualquier grupo. Elige las rutas, el tipo de terreno y las distancias que cumplan con tu zona de confort. Caminatas Empieza con un circuito más corto, avanza a terrenos más difíciles o únete a una caminata guiada. Pescar Puedes pescar sin licencia en tantos como 70 parques estatales. Muchos parques ofrecen equipo para pescar a manera de préstamo y eventos especiales para aprender a pescar. Barcos Renta canoas y kayacs y explora uno de los senderos acuáticos en Texas. Nadar Animales Silvestres Acampar Descubre aves, mamíferos y plantas que tienen su hogar en Texas. Muchos parques tienen señalamientos y listados que te ayudan a aprender más. Encuentra un lugar que cumpla con lo que quieres. Prueba nuevas recetas, comparte historias favoritas y disfruta de las estrellas. 2 Más información y reservaciones: parquesdetexas.org Escape del calor en arroyos, ríos, lagos, manantiales, piletas y playas del mar. Tu seguridad en el agua es muy importante. Lleva el chaleco salvavidas. Aprende a nadar. Guarda a los niños. (512) 389-8900 ¡Pregunta en tu parque cuáles están disponibles! Los niños de 12 años y menores entran GRATIS Cielos Estrellados Escapa de las luces de la ciudad y goza de maravillosas vistas del cielo que no encontrarás en ninguna otra parte. Ven a una fiesta de estrellas o toma una excursión de constelaciones auto-guiada. Familias en la Naturaleza Elige un taller o diseña tu propia aventura. ¡Monta una tienda de campaña, cocina al exterior, prende una fogata y juega al exterior! Nosotros te Toma una publicación gratuita de actividades o pregunta por los paquetes gratuitos con los parques proporcionamos todo el equipo. No es necesario tener experiencia. participantes. Usa los binoculares, lupas, libros de bosquejos y libros de guías para explorar el parque. Mochilas para Exploradores Soldados Búfalo de Texas Descubre la historia con cuentos, vestuarios y herramientas. Sigue la pista de un animal, pesca con caña, cocina sobre una fogata, visita los fuertes y más. Adéntrate en las historias de vida de aquellos que sirvieron valientemente en los primeros regimientos Áfrico-Americanos de las Fuerzas Armadas. ! Seguridad en el Parque Ten cuidado con el agua Pre

also available

National Parks
USFS NW
Alaska
Arizona
California
Colorado
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Minnesota
Montana
Nevada
New Mexico
North Carolina
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Texas
Utah
Virginia
Washington
Wyoming
Lake Tahoe - COMING SOON! 🎈
Yellowstone
Yosemite