"Guadalupe River State Park" by Stephen Rah , zero/1.0

Guadalupe River

State Park - Texas

Guadalupe River State Park is located on a section of the Guadalupe River in Kendall and Comal Counties, northwest of Bulverde, Texas. The park has four miles of river frontage for canoeing, fishing, swimming and tubing. Other activities include picnicking, hiking, birdwatching and camping. There is a 5.3 mile equestrian trail that can also be used for mountain biking. There is a two-hour guided interpretive tour of the adjacent Honey Creek State Natural Area.

location

maps

Trails Map of Guadalupe River State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Guadalupe River - Trails Map

Trails Map of Guadalupe River State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Official Texas Travel Map. Published by the Texas Department of Transportation.Texas - Travel Map

Official Texas Travel Map. Published by the Texas Department of Transportation.

brochures

Campground Map of Guadalupe River State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Guadalupe River - Campground Map

Campground Map of Guadalupe River State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Trails Map of Guadalupe River State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Guadalupe River - Trails Map

Trails Map of Guadalupe River State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Interpretive Guide of Guadalupe River State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Guadalupe River - Interpretive Guide

Interpretive Guide of Guadalupe River State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Birds at Guadalupe River State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Guadalupe River - Birds

Birds at Guadalupe River State Park (SP) in Texas. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Official Texas State Parks Guide. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Texas State - Official Texas State Parks Guide

Official Texas State Parks Guide. Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Official Texas State Parks Guide (español). Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.Texas State - Guía de Parques

Official Texas State Parks Guide (español). Published by Texas Parks & Wildlife.

Guadalupe River SP https://tpwd.texas.gov/state-parks/guadalupe-river https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guadalupe_River_State_Park Guadalupe River State Park is located on a section of the Guadalupe River in Kendall and Comal Counties, northwest of Bulverde, Texas. The park has four miles of river frontage for canoeing, fishing, swimming and tubing. Other activities include picnicking, hiking, birdwatching and camping. There is a 5.3 mile equestrian trail that can also be used for mountain biking. There is a two-hour guided interpretive tour of the adjacent Honey Creek State Natural Area.
For assistance using this map, contact the park. Trail maps available at park headquarters State Park TexasStateParks.org/App PARK RULES Bald Cypress Trail – .6 mi. As a state park, the primary focus of this site is to provide recreational opportunities while protecting fragile park resources and maintaining public safety. Help us to protect this special place by following the guidelines and regulations listed below: er Riv G ua d a l u pe 34 36 35 Priva te Pro per ty Park Boun dary Barred Owl Trail – .77 mi. N Cedar Sage Camping Area3 1 5 2 4 7 10 13 12 Live Oak Trail – .82 mi. 14 11 18 16 25 27 23 28 20 21 19 17 15 6 8 9 24 22 20 Bird Blind 20 Discovery Center Persimmon Path – .34 mi. Savannah Blind Painted Bunting Trail – 3.1 mi. Gate is locked each evening; check with park headquarters for exact time schedule. Park Boundary SPEED LIMIT Rust House Access by guided tour only 31 91 Wagon Ford Walk-in Tent Area ry a nd ou kB y sb ed id gu tou Showers Primitive Sites (Walk-in) Water and Electric Sites Hiking Trail 90 Gu ada l u pe ly n ro Restrooms Dump Station Honey Creek State Natural Area Biking Trail Equestrian Trail Equestrian Hitching Post Equestrian Parking Interpretive Trail Picnic Area GUIDED TOUR Wheelchair Accessible Meet at Rust House at 9 a.m. each Saturday morning for a guided interpretive tour of HONEY CREEK State Natural Area, emphasizing its history, geology, flora and fauna. Reservations are required via the park website. Dogs are not allowed. Parking Suggested Donation: $2 per person for persons 13 years and older or $5 per family. Friends of Guadalupe River/Honey Creek, Inc. are admitted free. Playground Amphitheater Interpretive Center Bird Blind Park Host Friends of Guadalupe River/ Honey Creek, Inc. Residence Please join us as a member of this support organization. Maintenance To find out more, ask at the Park Headquarters or log on to www.friendsofgrhc.org Prairie Trail – .38 mi. Total Trail Mileage 5.33 mi. Oak Savannah Loop – .5 mi. TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TTY) at (512) 389-8915 or by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989 or by email at accessibility@tpwd.texas.gov. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, please contact TPWD, 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, TX 78744, or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. © 2023 TPWD PWD MP P4505-040E (2/23) 78 75 92 State Parks Store Your contribution of professional services, volunteer services or your financial contributions can help protect and preserve this natural wonder for future generations. PARK ROAD 31 93 87 77 76 88 74 72 68 89 43 45 66 40 38 47 65 6764 63 62 4244 46 60 39 41 48 57 515356 49 61 50 59 52 54 55 58 85 s ce Ac PARK ROAD Ice, firewood, T-shirts and books are available at the park store located in the headquarters building. 94 86 8482 80 r Pa Texas State Parks Store Rapids SPEED LIMIT Turkey Sink Camping Area Private Property Park Boundary River does not flow in a circle. You will not come back around to the same place you put in. 70 30 37 79 32 31 33 NOTE 7 713 69 Rough Terrain 26 29 #BetterOutside Headquarters Discovery Center 83 81 • Public consumption or display of an alcoholic beverage is prohibited. All outdoor areas within the park are “public.” • All tents must be placed only on the designated 16' x 16' tent pad. • Pets must be kept on a leash no longer than 6' and must not be left unattended. • Black water and gray water can only be discharged at the dump station. • Gathering firewood is prohibited. • Keep camp and picnic areas clean. • All vehicles must remain on the pavement. • Campsite CHECK OUT time is noon. Renewal requests should be made by 9 a.m. and are subject to site availability. • Quiet hours are from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. and guests who do not have a camping permit must leave the park by 10 pm. • Numbered sites for overnight camping only. NO PICNICKING. • Cedar Sage Camping Loop maximum trailer length is 20 feet. • Equine must have proof of a negative EIA (Coggins) test within the past 12 months. The form VS 10-11 is proof of testing. Cedar Sage Trail – .4 mi. #TexasStateParks LEGEND Park Boundary Private Property See inset. TexasStateParks.org/SocialMedia R iv er Guadalupe River This publication can be found at tpwd.texas.gov/spdest/parkinfo/maps/park_maps/ PARK RESERVATIONS TexasStateParks.org ParquesDeTexas.org (512) 389-8900 3350 Park Road 31 Spring Branch, TX 78070 (830) 438-2656 Proud Sponsor of Texas State Parks
For assistance using this map, contact the park. For a web version of the map text, visit our Trails Information page. For information on #TexasStateParks, visit texasstateparks.org Sign up today for free email updates: texasstateparks.org/email /TexasStateParks @TPWDparks @TexasStateParks Sponsor: Whole Earth Provision Co.
BEYOND THE RIVER While at the park be sure to “take another look” at the children’s Discovery Center. This hands-on facility provides children and adults alike the opportunity to explore skins, skulls, skeletons while interactive exhibits reveal fascinating details of the park’s flora and fauna. Be sure to check out a backpack to continue your exploration along the trails. INTERPRETIVE GUIDE STEWARDSHIP OF THE PARK Undeveloped land such as Guadalupe River State Park and Honey Creek State Natural Area are becoming increasingly rare. Rapid development continues to destroy and fragment habitat in the surrounding area. Changes in recreation patterns and increased numbers of visitors have placed these precious resources at risk. An important step toward ensuring the future of this site is to appreciate and gain a better understanding of it. We encourage you as a visitor and user of this sensitive area to join us in this effort. • Educate yourself about the wonderful natural resources by attending regular weekend programs for families and children, including the Saturday morning Honey Creek hike, night hikes, stargazing, geocaching and much more. • Protect the natural and historical resources of the area by staying out of closed areas. • Learn more about German settlement and land management as well as natural resources in the Texas Hill Country. • Stay on designated trails to further reduce impacts. • Help keep the area clean by not littering, and take nothing but photographs when you leave. • Become a volunteer, join the Friends of Guadalupe River State Park and Honey Creek State Natural Area, or help by making a monetary donation. Guadalupe River SP and Honey Creek SNA 3350 Park Road 31, Spring Branch, TX 78070 (830) 438-2656 • www.tpwd.texas.gov/guadaluperiver/ Friends of Guadalupe River State Park/ Honey Creek State Natural Area: www.friendsofgrhc.org GUADALUPE R IIVER VER STATE PARK AND HONEY CREEK STATE NATURAL AREA CREAMY LIMESTONE CLIFFS AND TOWERING CYPRESS TREES GRIP THE BANKS OF A SEEMINGLY LAZY AND DOCILE RIVER TO CREATE THE FOCAL POINT OF GUADALUPE RIVER STATE PARK. THIS IDYLLIC SETTING IS THE ONLY DEVELOPED UPPER GUADALUPE, ONE OF THE MOST SCENIC RIVER SECTIONS IN TEXAS. YET THERE IS SO MUCH MORE TO GUADALUPE RIVER STATE PARK THAN THE BEAUTIFUL RIVER. LEAVE THE CROWDS BEHIND AND DISCOVER BEAUTIFUL PARK. TPWD receives funds from the USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. To request an accommodation or obtain information in an alternative format, please contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TTY) at (512) 389-8915 or by Relay Texas at 7-1-1 or (800) 735-2989 or by email at accessibility@tpwd.texas.gov. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, please contact TPWD, 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, TX 78744, or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. This publication can be found at tpwd.texas.gov/park-pubs Between headquarters and the river, seven miles of trails wind through grasslands and savannahs once dominated by impenetrable stands of second-growth Ashe juniper. Today you’ll encounter a diverse assemblage of wildflowers including antelope horns milkweed, an important host plant for monarch butterflies. Eastern bluebirds, vermilion, and scissor-tailed flycatchers, along with painted buntings galore nest in these restored habitats. PUBLIC ACCESS POINT TO THE OTHER WONDERS OF THIS © 2022 TPWD. PWD BR P4505-040G (7/22) Speaking of trails, there are more than 13 miles of hiking trails, including six miles on the Bauer Unit, located across from the day use area. Home to our largest population of the golden-cheeked warbler, trails at the Bauer Unit wind through a mix of grasslands, oak woodlands and stands of old-growth Ashe junipers. The Discovery Center offers hands-on experiences for youth and adults. R I V E R S T A T E P A R K A N D H O N E Y C R E E K S T A T E N A T U R A L A R E A HO N E Y C REEK S NA RESPECTING THE RIVER The Guadalupe is a true Texas river, flowing entirely within the state. The 2.75-mile portion within the park is wild, rugged and untamed by dams. Respect is required; river conditions can change instantly since the river flows free and is subject to intense flash flooding. A Enjoy this beautiful protected area by joining our weekly Saturday morning guided walk. Beginning at the historic Rust house, you’ll learn both cultural and natural history as you pass through restored grasslands and old-growth Ashe juniper, your walk culminating at the breathtaking creek. Occasional night hikes are also offered to enjoy the tranquility of the night along the stream’s bank. Along the way, you may hear the steady clicking of the Blanchard’s cricket frog, the distinctive call of the barred owl or catch the on-and-off twinkling of fireflies. “Th
BIRDS OF GUADALUPE RIVER STATE PARK AND HONEY CREEK STATE NATURAL AREA A FIELD CHECKLIST 2022 Cover: Illustration of Vermilion Flycatcher by Clemente Guzman III. INTRODUCTION G uadalupe River State Park and Honey Creek State Natural Area lie within Comal and Kendall counties and comprise 4,232 acres of the Texas Hill Country. The centerpieces of the area include two miles of the beautiful Guadalupe River flowing through the state park as well as idyllic Honey Creek, a 1.5-mile spring-fed creek, most of which is contained within the natural area. The park is divided into two sections. On the south shore of the river is the main park, which offers recreational opportunities to visitors. Find river access, picnic tables, multi-use trails (hiking, biking, and equestrian), and campsites here. Located on the river’s north shore is the Bauer Unit, which offers a more remote experience for daytime exploration, with over six miles of hiking and biking trails. Honey Creek State Natural Area, located on the south side of the Guadalupe River, is accessible by guided programs only. Each weekend, trained volunteers lead guided hikes to Honey Creek, and the park interpreter also occasionally holds interpretive programs there. Three distinct habitats (riparian, woodland, and savannah) define birding within the park and natural area. The riparian areas along the Guadalupe River and Honey Creek waterways are highlighted with centuries-old bald cypress trees. Pecan, walnut, sycamore, and dwarf palmetto are also abundant within the riparian zone. Ashe juniper, live oak, cedar elm, chinkapin oak, persimmon, and agarita fill the woodlands. The savannahs offer sweeping views filled with tall and short grasses and many wildflowers. More than 13 miles of trails wandering through these habitats allow for close exploration. As you explore, watch for signs of the park’s land management efforts to restore the live oak savannah that was here prior to European settlement. Prescribed burns have resulted in the return of grassland and savannah species such as vermilion and scissor-tailed flycatcher, eastern bluebird, and dickcissel, which now breed in the park and natural area. Designated an Important Bird Area by the American Bird Conservancy, more than 240 bird species have been observed in the park and natural area, the most sought-after species being the federally endangered golden-cheeked warbler. This bird is a true native Texan, nesting exclusively in the Texas Hill Country. The best way to find it is to listen for its high-pitched, buzzy song in the spring, in both the park and natural area wherever there are mixed old growth Ashe juniper and oak woodlands. The park and natural areas are also known for regional specialty species. Painted bunting, Inca dove, common ground-dove, zone-tailed hawk, crested caracara, green kingfisher, scissor-tailed flycatcher, golden-fronted woodpecker, 1 ladder-backed woodpecker, and Woodhouse’s scrub-jay are a few of the park’s more sought-after species. Birding opportunities are exceptional year-round, with spring being the “birdiest” time of year. During the spring, the park and natural area welcome the return of breeding species and serve as a waystation for migrants passing through on their way north. Summer offers an opportunity to study youngsters and to witness first flights as nestlings come of age. In the fall, the park and natural area again serve as a waystation for birds migrating south, with encounters of large flyover flocks possible. Winter is the time for sparrows that use the park as a winter home. The savannah areas are quite active during the winter months and offer a wonderful opportunity to practice sparrow identification. The Friends of Guadalupe River and Honey Creek provide funds for a bird blind located in a woodland section of the park’s Day Use Area. A volunteer care team keeps the solar-powered water feature and bird feeders active throughout the year. A second bird blind, located in a savannah section along the Painted Bunting Trail, is planned for completion in 2022. Both offer shaded seating and opportunities for up-close views and photography. Donations to the Friends are always appreciated. Nomenclature and organization of this checklist is based on the American Birding Association (ABA) Checklist Version 8.1. This updated list would not have been possible without the original work compiled by Sue Widenfeld and subsequent revisions by Craig Hensley and Paul Freeman, who utilized a repository of volunteer-prepared paper checklists. This latest update by volunteers Linda Gindler and John Prentice, and GRSP interpreter Holly Platz, is based on efforts from the earlier lists as well as surveys performed and documented within Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s online platform, eBird. eBird contains bird sightings submitted by staff, volunteers conducting bird surveys, and many park visitors acting as citizen scientists. You can contribute to this knowledge by reporti
-Official- FACILITIES Get the Mobile App: MAPS ACTIVITIES TexasStateParks.org/app T O Y O T A T U N D R A The Toyota Tundra is built to explore the great outdoors. No matter what the weekend throws at you, your Tundra takes it on with ease. | toyota.com/tundra Official Vehicle of the Texas Parks & Wildlife Foundation CONTENTS 4 100 Years of Texas Parks 6 Parks Near You 8 90 Checklist DIRECTORY TEXAS PARKS AND WILDLIFE DEPARTMENT 52 68 20 38 60 30 84 68 David Yoskowitz, Ph.D. Executive Director Rodney Franklin State Parks Director Mischelle Diaz Communications Director TPW COMMISSION Arch “Beaver” Aplin, III, Chairman Lake Jackson Dick Scott, Vice-Chairman Wimberley James E. Abell Kilgore Oliver J. Bell Cleveland Paul L. Foster El Paso Anna B. Galo Laredo Jeffery D. Hildebrand Houston Robert L. “Bobby” Patton, Jr. Fort Worth Travis B. “Blake” Rowling Dallas T. Dan Friedkin, Chairman-Emeritus Houston Lee Marshall Bass, Chairman-Emeritus Fort Worth 52 Panhandle Plains 48 State Parks Map Special thanks to Toyota and advertisers, whose generous support made this guide possible. Texas State Parks is a division of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. Cover illustration: Brad Woodard, bravethewoods.com Texas State Parks Official Guide, Nineteenth Edition © TPWD PWD BK P4000-000A (3/23) TPWD receives funds from DHS and USFWS. TPWD prohibits discrimination based on race, color, religion, national origin (including limited English proficiency), disability, age, and gender, pursuant to state and federal law. If you believe you have been discriminated against by TPWD, visit tpwd.texas. gov/nondiscrimination or call (512) 389-4800 for information on filing a complaint. To obtain information in an alternative format, contact TPWD on a Text Telephone (TTY) at (512) 389-8915, by Relay Texas at 7-1-1, (800) 735-2989, or by email at accessibility@tpwd.texas.gov. If you speak a language other than English and need assistance, email lep@tpwd.texas.gov. You can also contact Department of the Interior Office of Diversity, Inclusion, and Civil Rights, 1849 C Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20240, and/or U.S. Department of Homeland Security Office for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties (CRCL), Mail Stop #0190 2707, Martin Luther King, Jr. Ave., S.E. Washington, D.C. 20528. In accordance with Texas State Depository Law, this publication is available at the Texas State Publications Clearinghouse and/or Texas Depository Libraries. WELCOME from Rodney Franklin, State Parks Director This year is very special for Texas State Parks: We are celebrating our 100-year anniversary in 2023. More and more Texans are discovering the beauty of State Parks and exploring the outdoors in new and adventurous ways. Our teams across the state are incredibly excited to welcome outdoor enthusiasts, especially those who have yet to discover what our parks have to offer. The variety of Texas’ lands is unmatched; from the mountains of west Texas to the Gulf shores, the Texas State Park system celebrates and preserves the natural and cultural treasures that make Texas such a special place. The 640,000-plus acres that make up the state park system are nearly as diverse as the people of Texas. Since 1923, our mission has been to help connect our visitors with the outdoors. As we honor those who have come before us, I invite a new generation to be a part of the story of the lands that connect us all. There is more to enjoy in our parks than you know, so please join us in our celebrations and activities. Every day we look for new and better ways to ensure your state parks are welcoming to every Texan, regardless of their background or experience being outside. I hope you’ll visit soon and often, while bringing your friends and family along. YOU are a natural and we’re looking forward to celebrating the 100-year anniversary of state parks with you! WHAT’S NEW IN STATE PARKS Galveston Island State Park reopened the beachside of the park with a new headquarters, campsites, restrooms, and more. Bastrop State Park unveiled an extensive new group of trails, the “Tree Army Trails,” many of which are ADA-accessible. Improvements and major repairs are planned for Indian Lodge, Tyler, Inks Lake, Cedar Hill, South Llano River, Eisenhower and several other state parks All-terrain “GRIT” wheelchairs are now available at 10 parks with more adaptive equipment on the way to help people of all abilities experience Texas State Parks. Learn more about our accessibility efforts, page 14. More information: TexasStateParks.org/whatsnew 100 Years of Texas Parks The crown jewels of Texas road trips started as an unfunded wish list before the Depression. Back in 1923, Governor Pat Neff realized rising numbers of new car travelers needed places to camp overnight on multi-day trips. Neff convinced the state legislature to create a six-member State Parks Board, half men, half women. Isabella, the Governor’s mother, and her family donated acreage on the Leon
Guía de Parques INSTALACIONES Descarga la Aplicacíon Móvil MAPAS ACTIVIDADES texasstateparks.org/app ¡Los niños entran gratis! La entrada es gratis para los niños de 12 años y menores. Encuentra un parque: parquesdetexas.org Contenido Estero Llano Grande SP 2 Actividades y Programas 4 Parques Cercanos 6 Lugares para Quedarse 8 Tarifas y Pases 9 Directorio 10 Mapa de Parques 18 Instalaciones y Actividades BIENVENIDO Rodney Franklin, Director de Parques Texas tiene algunas de las tierras públicas más diversas del país, con una gran riqueza natural y cultural. La vida silvestre está por todas partes, los paisajes florecen con belleza, y la historia es abundante. Sus parques estatales son parte del legado que nos enorgullece. La gente de Texas ayuda a asegurar ese legado para las generaciones futuras al visitar y ser voluntarios. ¡Gracias! Estos más de 630,000 acres exhiben algunos de los grandes tesoros del estado. Los parques nos ayudan a crear recuerdos con la familia y a encontrar consuelo en la naturaleza. Los parques fortalecen las economías locales y unen a las comunidades. Sobre todo, los parques nos permiten pasar tiempo al aire libre para recargar energías, estar saludables y relajarnos a nuestra manera. Les invito a disfrutar de sus parques estatales, explorando lo mejor de Texas con amigos y familia. Los parques están aquí para todos. Nos pertenecen a todos. ¡Visítelos, diviértase y ayude a protegerlos para siempre! Foto de portada: Estero Llano State Park, Chase Fountain © 2021 TPWD PWD BK P4000-000A (5/21) TPWD recibe fondos del Servicio de Pesca y Vida Silvestre de EE.UU. (USFWS por sus siglas en ingles). TPWD prohíbe la discriminación por raza, color, religión, nacionalidad de origen, discapacidad, edad y género, conforme la ley estatal y federal. Para solicitar un acomodo especial u obtener información en un formato alternativo, por favor contacte a TPWD en un Teléfono de Texto (TTY) al (512) 3898915 ó por medio de “Relay Texas” al 7-1-1 ó (800) 735-2989 ó por email a accessibility@tpwd.texas.gov. Si usted cree que TPWD ha discriminado en su contra, favor de comunicarse con TPWD, 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, TX 78744, o con el Servicio de Pesca y Vida Silvestre de EE.UU., Office for Diversity and Workforce Management, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041. De acuerdo con la Ley de Depósito del Estado de Texas, esta publicación está disponible en el centro de Distribución de Publicaciones del Estado de Texas y/o las Bibliotecas de Depósito de Texas. ACTIVIDADES Y PROGRAMAS ¿Qué puedo hacer en los parques estatales? ¡Disfruta de un día de campo, visita un sitio histórico o elige entre muchas otras opciones! Bicicletas Pedalea a lo largo de los parques a cualquier velocidad, en cualquier estilo, con cualquier grupo. Elige las rutas, el tipo de terreno y las distancias que cumplan con tu zona de confort. Caminatas Empieza con un circuito más corto, avanza a terrenos más difíciles o únete a una caminata guiada. Pescar Puedes pescar sin licencia en tantos como 70 parques estatales. Muchos parques ofrecen equipo para pescar a manera de préstamo y eventos especiales para aprender a pescar. Barcos Renta canoas y kayacs y explora uno de los senderos acuáticos en Texas. Nadar Animales Silvestres Acampar Descubre aves, mamíferos y plantas que tienen su hogar en Texas. Muchos parques tienen señalamientos y listados que te ayudan a aprender más. Encuentra un lugar que cumpla con lo que quieres. Prueba nuevas recetas, comparte historias favoritas y disfruta de las estrellas. 2 Más información y reservaciones: parquesdetexas.org Escape del calor en arroyos, ríos, lagos, manantiales, piletas y playas del mar. Tu seguridad en el agua es muy importante. Lleva el chaleco salvavidas. Aprende a nadar. Guarda a los niños. (512) 389-8900 ¡Pregunta en tu parque cuáles están disponibles! Los niños de 12 años y menores entran GRATIS Cielos Estrellados Escapa de las luces de la ciudad y goza de maravillosas vistas del cielo que no encontrarás en ninguna otra parte. Ven a una fiesta de estrellas o toma una excursión de constelaciones auto-guiada. Familias en la Naturaleza Elige un taller o diseña tu propia aventura. ¡Monta una tienda de campaña, cocina al exterior, prende una fogata y juega al exterior! Nosotros te Toma una publicación gratuita de actividades o pregunta por los paquetes gratuitos con los parques proporcionamos todo el equipo. No es necesario tener experiencia. participantes. Usa los binoculares, lupas, libros de bosquejos y libros de guías para explorar el parque. Mochilas para Exploradores Soldados Búfalo de Texas Descubre la historia con cuentos, vestuarios y herramientas. Sigue la pista de un animal, pesca con caña, cocina sobre una fogata, visita los fuertes y más. Adéntrate en las historias de vida de aquellos que sirvieron valientemente en los primeros regimientos Áfrico-Americanos de las Fuerzas Armadas. ! Seguridad en el Parque Ten cuidado con el agua Pre

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