by Alex Gugel , all rights reserved

Zion

National Park - Utah

Zion National Park is a southwest Utah nature preserve distinguished by Zion Canyon’s steep red cliffs. Zion Canyon Scenic Drive cuts through its main section, leading to forest trails along the Virgin River. The river flows to the Emerald Pools, which have waterfalls and a hanging garden. Also along the river, partly through deep chasms, is Zion Narrows wading hike.

location

maps

Visitor Map of Zion National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Zion - Visitor Map

Visitor Map of Zion National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of Smithsonian Butte National Back Country Byway in the BLM St. George Field Office area in Utah. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Smithsonian Butte - National Back Country Byway Map

Map of Smithsonian Butte National Back Country Byway in the BLM St. George Field Office area in Utah. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Map of Gooseberry Mesa Trail System near Zion National Park (NP) in the BLM St. George Field Office area in Utah. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Gooseberry Mesa - Trail System

Map of Gooseberry Mesa Trail System near Zion National Park (NP) in the BLM St. George Field Office area in Utah. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of Colorado City Travel Management Area (TMA) in the BLM Arizona Strip Field Office area in Arizona. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Arizona Strip - Colorado City

Map of Colorado City Travel Management Area (TMA) in the BLM Arizona Strip Field Office area in Arizona. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Visitor Map of the southern part of the BLM Kanab Field Office area in Utah. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Kanab - Visitor Map South 2017

Visitor Map of the southern part of the BLM Kanab Field Office area in Utah. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Map of the Daily Lottery Permit Application Geofence Perimeter for Coyote Buttes North (The Wave) and South in the Vermilion Cliffs National Monument (NM), Arizona Strip BLM Field Office area and Kanab BLM Field Office area in Utah and Arizona. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Coyote Buttes South - Daily Lottery Permit Application Geofence Perimeter

Map of the Daily Lottery Permit Application Geofence Perimeter for Coyote Buttes North (The Wave) and South in the Vermilion Cliffs National Monument (NM), Arizona Strip BLM Field Office area and Kanab BLM Field Office area in Utah and Arizona. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Official Utah Highway Map. Published by the Utah Department of Transportation.Utah State - Highway Map

Official Utah Highway Map. Published by the Utah Department of Transportation.

brochures

Official Brochure of Zion National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Zion - Brochure

Official Brochure of Zion National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Spring Information Sheet for Zion National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Zion Maps and Guides - Spring 2023

Spring Information Sheet for Zion National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Winter Information Sheet for Zion National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Zion Maps and Guides - Winter 2022/2023

Winter Information Sheet for Zion National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Fall Information Sheet for Zion National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Zion Maps and Guides - Fall 2022

Fall Information Sheet for Zion National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Summer Information Sheet for Zion National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Zion Maps and Guides - Summer 2022

Summer Information Sheet for Zion National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

The official 2009 Centennial Newspaper of Zion National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Zion Maps and Guides - 2009 Centennial Newspaper

The official 2009 Centennial Newspaper of Zion National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

The Wilderness Guide is designed to answer most of the common questions about wilderness use in the park and includes a map, Subway and Narrows information, and details about the permit system. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Wilderness - Wilderness Guide 2021

The Wilderness Guide is designed to answer most of the common questions about wilderness use in the park and includes a map, Subway and Narrows information, and details about the permit system. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

This map is given to overnight hikers that have a permit for camping in the Southwest Desert part of Zion. It is useful to have a map that helps locate the campsites. It may also be useful for day trips. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Wilderness - Southwest Desert Campsites

This map is given to overnight hikers that have a permit for camping in the Southwest Desert part of Zion. It is useful to have a map that helps locate the campsites. It may also be useful for day trips. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

This map is for visitors with permits to hike the Narrows top-down. This information is useful for finding the Narrows campsites. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Wilderness - Narrows Campsites

This map is for visitors with permits to hike the Narrows top-down. This information is useful for finding the Narrows campsites. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

This handout is for visitors with a permit to do the Pine Creek technical slot canyon. This information helps visitors prevent erosion at the entrance to the canyon, located near tunnel east. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Wilderness - Pine Creek Canyon

This handout is for visitors with a permit to do the Pine Creek technical slot canyon. This information helps visitors prevent erosion at the entrance to the canyon, located near tunnel east. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

This handout is for visitors with a permit to do the Spry Canyon technical slot canyon. This information helps prevent erosion at the sandy exit slope after you come out of the slot section. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Wilderness - Spry Canyon

This handout is for visitors with a permit to do the Spry Canyon technical slot canyon. This information helps prevent erosion at the sandy exit slope after you come out of the slot section. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

This handout is for visitors with a permit to do the Keyhole technical slot canyon. This information helps prevent erosion at the entrance slope when accessing the canyon. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Wilderness - Spry Canyon

This handout is for visitors with a permit to do the Keyhole technical slot canyon. This information helps prevent erosion at the entrance slope when accessing the canyon. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Brochure of Birds at Zion National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Zion - Birds

Brochure of Birds at Zion National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Brochure of Mammals at Zion National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Zion - Mammals

Brochure of Mammals at Zion National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Brochure of Plants at Zion National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Zion - Plants

Brochure of Plants at Zion National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Brochure of Reptiles and Amphibians at Zion National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Zion - Reptiles and Amphibians

Brochure of Reptiles and Amphibians at Zion National Park (NP) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/zion https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zion_National_Park Zion National Park is a southwest Utah nature preserve distinguished by Zion Canyon’s steep red cliffs. Zion Canyon Scenic Drive cuts through its main section, leading to forest trails along the Virgin River. The river flows to the Emerald Pools, which have waterfalls and a hanging garden. Also along the river, partly through deep chasms, is Zion Narrows wading hike. Follow the paths where people have walked for thousands of years. Gaze up at massive sandstone cliffs of cream, pink, and red that soar into a brilliant blue sky. Experience wilderness in a narrow slot canyon. Zion’s unique array of plants and animals will enchant you as you absorb the rich history of the past and enjoy the excitement of present-day adventures. Zion National Park's main, south entrance and administrative offices are located near Springdale, Utah You may drive yourself on all open park roads except the Zion Canyon Scenic Drive. During most of the year, the Scenic Drive is accessed by shuttle bus only. Shuttles are free to ride. Board one in Springdale or at the Zion Canyon Visitor Center. Human History Museum Indoor exhibits focus in the human history of Zion National Park. A 22-minute orientation film highlights the dramatic landscapes of the park and examines the history of the canyon. Rotating art exhibits feature regional artists. Visit the bookstore for maps, book, and gifts. There are dramatic views of the Towers of the Virgin and Bridge Mountain outside. Kolob Canyons Visitor Center This is the entry point to the Kolob Canyons area of the park. It is located 45 miles north of Springdale and 17 miles south of Cedar City at Exit 40 on Interstate 15. Park rangers are available to answer questions. Exhibits explore the geology, vegetation, and wildlife of this unique landscape. This is the entry point to the Kolob Canyons area of the park. It is located 45 miles north of Springdale and 17 miles south of Cedar City at Exit 40 on Interstate 15. Zion Canyon Visitor Center Located near the South Entrance of the park, the Zion Canyon Visitor Center is an excellent place to begin your exploration of Zion Canyon. Park rangers and outdoor exhibits will help you plan your visit and make the most of your time. Inquire at the Zion Canyon Wilderness Desk about permits for backpacking, canyoneering, and other trips into the wilderness. Visit the bookstore for maps, books, and gifts. By Car Zion National Park is located on State Route 9 in Springdale, Utah. All mileages below represent the distance from the Zion Canyon Visitor Center. From Las Vegas, Nevada (163 miles), Mesquite, Nevada (80 miles), and Saint George, Utah (40 miles): Interstate 15 North Exit 16 - Right on State Route 9 East (33 miles) Right to stay on State Route 9 East in La Verkin, Utah (20 miles) Stay on State Route 9 East into Zion National Park, the Zion Canyon Visitor Center is ahead on the right. Lava Point Campground This campground is typically open May through September, as weather allows. Situated at 7890 feet above sea level, it is off the Kolob Terrace Road, 25 miles (45 minutes) north of the town of Virgin. It takes approximately one hour and 20 minutes to drive to the campground from the South Entrance of Zion Canyon. There are 6 primitive campsites available for reservations. The campground has pit toilets and trash cans, but no water. Vehicles longer than 19 feet are not permitted. Sign alongside forested dirt road directs campers to the campground entrance. Breathtaking view of rolling forests and Zion's steep canyon walls in the distance. Picnic table and fire ring inside a dirt campsite surrounded by forest. South Campground South Campground is located near the Zion Canyon Visitor Center, ½ mile from the South Entrance at Springdale, Utah. Tent, dry RV, and group campsites are available by reservation from March through October. All sites include a place for a tent or RV, a picnic table, and a fire ring. Reservations may be made 14 days in advance of your stay. Reservations are needed because the campground is full nearly every night during the reservation season. Tent Campsites 20.00 Tent Campsites Group Campsites 50.00 Group Campsites South Campground South Campground South Campground Watchman Campground Watchman Campground is located next to the Zion Canyon Visitor Center, ¼ mile away from the South Entrance in Springdale, Utah. Tent and electric campsites are available year-round and group campsites are available from March through November. All sites include a place for a tent or RV, a picnic table, and access to a fire ring. All campsites in Watchman Campground require reservations year-round. Reservations may be made six (6) months in advance. Electric Campsites (until July 3, 2024) 30.00 Generators are not permitted, but 95 campsites have electrical hookups. Reserve an electric campsite if you need power. Tent Only Campsites (until July 3, 2024) 20.00 There are 69 campsites that are for tents only with combined vehicle length less than 19' (5.8 m). There are 18 Tent Only, Walk-in campsites. These sites are a short walking distance from parking. Group Campsites (until July 3, 2024) 50.00 There are 6 group campsites that are limited to one site per affiliated group at a time with a seven day per stay limit. The sites can accommodate from 9 to 40 campers. The group campsites are tent only. RVs, camping trailers, and pop-up campers are not permitted. Cost $50.00 per night for 7-12 people, $90.00 per night for 16-25 people and $130.00 per night for 26-40 people. Accessible Sites (until July 3, 2024) 10.00 2 wheelchair accessible sites Watchman Campground Watchman Campground Watchman Campground Watchman Campground Restroom Watchman Campground Restroom Watchman Campground Restroom The Watchman A triangular sandstone mountain overlooks green and yellow foliage. A cloudy blue sky is overhead. The Watchman in Zion Canyon The Towers of the Virgin The sun sets behind large red and white towers of sandstone. The Towers of the Virgin in Zion Canyon Zion Canyon Visitor Center A sandstone and glass building surrounded by tall trees with a mountain behind it. The Zion Canyon Visitor Center is a great place to stop to learn about the park! The Narrows Tall, red, sandstone walls enclose a narrow river. The Narrows can be accessed at the end of Riverside Walk, just follow the river. Kolob Arch A red sandstone arch under a clear blue sky. Deep in Zion's Wilderness site Kolob Arch, one of the largest free-standing arches in the world. 2009 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2009 Environmental Achievement Awards 2011 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2011 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards The Civilian Conservation Corps As part of the New Deal Program, to help lift the United States out of the Great Depression, Franklin D. Roosevelt established the Civilian Conservation Corps in 1933. The CCC or C’s as it was sometimes known, allowed single men between the ages of 18 and 25 to enlist in work programs to improve America’s public lands, forests, and parks. CCC men lined up in front of a building and looking at a flag pole with an american flag. Jolley Gulch Fire Spread Limited by Prior Prescribed Fires Jolley Gulch Fire, July 23, 2017 Jolley Gulch Fire, July 23, 2017 California Condor Species description of the California Condor (Gymnogyps californianus). An adult condor with the wing tag label number 80 stands over a juvenile condor. Wildland Fire: Clear Trap Prescribed Fire The Clear Trap prescribed fire in Zion National Park will benefit both the park and the landowners and residents of the East Zion area. The burn will lower the risk from wildland fire, and also benefit the plants and animals of the fire-adapted ecosystem. The policy of using fire as a management tool will help decrease risks to life, property, and resources and will perpetuate the values for which the park was established. Cooperation of local interagency partners was vital. Fire burns vegetation near a barbed wire fence. Geologic Maps in Action—Identify Hazards <strong>Zion National Park, Utah</strong><br> Example of the application of geologic map data to analyze rockfall hazard potential. large boulder on top of crushed truck The Civilian Conservation Corps at Cedar Breaks In 1934, on July 4th, the CCC made their first appearance at Cedar Breaks, “acting as traffic directors, assisting in getting many of the stalled cars up to the Breaks and serving a barbecue to some 3,000 people” at the official dedication ceremony and celebration for the new national monument. That, of course was just the beginning of the Cs’ involvement at Cedar Breaks National Monument. Civilian Conservation Corps crew at Cedar Breaks Arches National Park’s Free-Flowing Waters Visitors to Arches National Park experience natural free-flowing waters and have water to quench their thirst, thanks to an agreement between the National Park Service and the State of Utah. The sun sits just below the horizon behind Delicate Arch. Landbird Monitoring in Northern Colorado Plateau Network Parks, 2018 Because birds can be sensitive to habitat change, they are good indicators of ecosystem integrity. The Northern Colorado Plateau Network partners with the University of Delaware to assess breeding-bird species trends in three different habitats: low-elevation riparian, pinyon-juniper, and sage shrubland. Find out which species were increasing and declining at network parks as of 2018. Small, bright-orange bird with yellowish underfeathers. SW CA Condor Update - 2013-01 (January) From January 2013: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. Survival of the Southern Paiute The Paiutes have overcome insurmountable challenges and devastation as a people. Their long struggle to preserve the Paiute way and flourish continues. But they will not give up. Instead, they celebrate their achievements, promising that while “[t]he struggle is long and difficult… the Paiute will survive.” Native American man in ceremonial dress with orange cliffs in the background. California Condor Reintroduction & Recovery A tagged California condor flies free. NPS Photo/ Don Sutherland A wing-tagged California condor flying in the blue sky. Traits, Tradeoffs, and Pivot Points: How Climate, Plant, and Soil Properties Affect Vegetation Growth on the Northern Colorado Plateau As the northern Colorado Plateau heads into a hotter, drier future, there will be ecological winners and losers. Figuring out how different vegetation communities will fare is tricky. A recent study aimed to identify which vegetation communities might come out ahead, which might lag behind, and what might make the difference. Desert grassland in red rock setting. Pink wildflowers grow in foreground as storm brews in the sky. The Sounds of Spring When the weather warms, national parks across the country rouse from winter’s sleep. The sounds you hear in parks reflect this seasonal change. They contribute to the unique soundscape of these special places, and are among the resources that the National Park Service protects. Sandhill cranes dance in a courtship ritual in flooded grasslands at Great Sand Dunes NP. Wildland Fire in Douglas Fir: Western United States Douglas fir is widely distributed throughout the western United States, as well as southern British Columbia and northern Mexico. Douglas fir is able to survive without fire, its abundantly-produced seeds are lightweight and winged, allowing the wind to carry them to new locations where seedlings can be established. Close-up of Douglas fir bark and needles. Module Conducts Wildland-Urban Interface Projects Throughout the Intermountain Region In 2013, the Saguaro Wildland Fire Module (WFM) managed multiple projects simultaneously in AZ, TX, and NM. WFMs are highly skilled and versatile fire crews that provide expertise in long-term planning, ignitions, holding, prescribed fire preparation and implementation support, hazardous fuels reduction, and fire effects monitoring. With their help, fire fulfills its natural or historic role to meet resource and management objectives and create fire-adapted communities. 2006 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2006 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards 2005 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2005 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards 2004 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2004 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Contaminants of Emerging Concern in Northern Colorado Plateau Park Waters Pesticides, antibiotics, and personal care products are all being found in streams and rivers. But would you expect to find them in a national park? On the northern Colorado Plateau, scientists found that even in isolated areas, these "contaminants of emerging concern" are not uncommon. Find out what we found where--and how you can help. Ripples in cave water About The Southern Paiute “Paa” ute means water ute, and explains the Southern Paiute preference for living near water sources. The Spanish explorer Escalante kept detailed journals of his travels in the Southwest and made notes concerning Southern Paiute horticulture, writing in 1776, that there were “well dug irrigation ditches” being used to water small fields of corn, pumpkins, squash, and sunflowers. Southern Paiute boy by wickiup shelter. Park Air Profiles - Zion National Park Air quality profile for Zion National Park. Gives park-specific information about air quality and air pollution impacts for Zion NP as well as the studies and monitoring conducted for Zion NP. Welcome sign at Zion National Park SW CA Condor Update - 2017-01 (January) From January 2017: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2015-11 (November) From November 2015: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2015-02 (February) From February 2015: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2014-11 (November) From November 2014: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2015-07 (July) From July 2015: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2016-04 (April) From April 2016: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2014-07 (July) From July 2014 : An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2019-09 (September) An update on the Southwest California Condor Meta-Population for September 2019 from Grand Canyon National Park. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2017-04 (April) An update on the status of the Arizona/ Utah population of the California condor. A condor flying. Zion Lodge/Birch Creek Cultural Landscape Zion Lodge and Birch Creek, though not contiguous, represent one unified phase of development by the historic concessionaire, the Utah Parks Company, within Zion National Park. Construction of the buildings and landscape features within the area began in 1924 and continued through 1937. On a regional scale, the Zion Lodge/Birch Creek cultural landscape is significant for its association with the rise of tourism in southern Utah and northern Arizona. Zion Lodge (NPS) Zion National Park Welcomes New Fire Management Officer Zion National Park Welcomes New Fire Management Officer SW CA Condor Update - 2012-10 (October) From October 2010: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. Wildland Fire in Ponderosa Pine: Western United States This forest community generally exists in areas with annual rainfall of 25 inches or less. Extensive pure stands of this forest type are found in the southwestern U.S., central Washington and Oregon, southern Idaho and the Black Hills of South Dakota. Recently burned ponderosa pine forest. World CA Condor Update - 2018 An update on the world California Condor population for 2018. A close-up of the pink bald head of a California condor with a ruffle of black feathers. World CA Condor Update - 2016 Population Status An update on the world California Condor population for 2016. A close up of the pink bald head of a California condor with a ruffle of black feathers. World CA Condor Update - 2017 An update on the world California Condor population for 2017. A close-up of the pink bald head of a California condor with a ruffle of black feathers. SW CA Condor Update - 2014-03 (March) From March 2014: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2013-10 (October) From October 2013: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW Ca Condor Update - 2013-04 (April) From April 2013: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2013-07 (July) From July 2013: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2018-04 (April) Update on the AZ/UT population of California condors in April of 2018. A condor flying wild and free. World CA Condor Update – 2019 An update on the world California Condor population for 2019. A close-up of the pink bald head of a California condor with a ruffle of black feathers. SW CA Condor Update – 2020-02 An update on the Southwest California Condor Meta-Population for 2019 from Grand Canyon National Park (updated February 2020). A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2012-06 (June) From June 2016: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2012-04 (April) From April 2012: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2012-07 (July) From July 2012: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2011-03 (March) From March 2011: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. Read more A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2011-12 (December) From Decmeber 2011: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2010-12 (December) From December 2010: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2011-11 (November) From November 2011: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2011-07 (July) From July 2011: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. Read more A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2011-01 (January) From January 2011: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2009-11 (November) From November 2009: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2010-03 (March) From March 2010: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2010-05 (May) From May 2010: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2010-10 (October) From October 2010: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. SW CA Condor Update - 2009-07 (July) From July 2009: An update from Grand Canyon National Park on the California Condor recovery program for the Arizona/ Utah population. A condor flying wild and free. Pollinators - Monarch butterfly More than beautiful, monarch butterflies contribute to the health of our planet. While feeding on nectar, they pollinate many types of wildflowers, yet one of the greatest threats to Monarch populations is loss of habitat. A Monarch clings to an orange flower The Adverse Effects of Climate Change on Desert Bighorn Sheep Climate change has and will continue to have a negative impact on the population of desert bighorn sheep. For the remaining herds to survive, management may always be necessary. Protecting wild lands is key to the survival of these amazing animals. Desert bighorn sheep, NPS/Shawn Cigrand What We’re Learning and Why it Matters: Long-Term Monitoring on the Northern Colorado Plateau Knowing which key natural resources are found in the national parks, and whether they're stable or changing, helps decisionmakers make sound choices. The Northern Colorado Plateau Network is building that knowledge. After more than ten years of monitoring, we've learned a lot about park ecosystems, how they're changing, and what they may look like in the days to come. Find out what we’ve learned and how it’s being used to help managers plan for the future. Man stands in a stream, looking down at a handheld gauge. Landbird Population Trends in the Northern Colorado Plateau Network, 2019 Because birds can be sensitive to habitat change, they are good indicators of ecosystem integrity. The Northern Colorado Plateau Network partners with the University of Delaware to assess breeding-bird species trends in three different habitats: low-elevation riparian, pinyon-juniper, and sage shrubland. Find out which species were increasing and declining at network parks as of 2019. Bald eagle Water Quality in the Northern Colorado Plateau Network: Water Years 2016–2018 Once a month, ecologists collect water samples at dozens of monitoring sites in and near ten National Park Service units across Utah and Colorado. This consistent, long-term monitoring helps alert managers to existing and potential problems. Find out the results for 2016-2018 in this brief from the Northern Colorado Plateau Network. A monitoring crew of three samples a clear river flowing over brown rock and sand Invasive Exotic Plant Monitoring in Zion National Park, 2018 Invasive exotic plants are one of the most significant threats to natural resources in the national parks today. To provide early warning of weed invasions, the Northern Colorado Plateau Network monitors target plants in park areas where they are likely to first establish: along roads, trails, and waterways. Find out what we learned at Zion National Park in 2018. Red and white cliffs against a blue sky, green trees and shrubs at lower elevations. Water Quality Trends in Zion National Park, 2006–2016 “Is it safe to go in the water?” It’s a pretty basic question—and a really important one. In Zion National Park, the Northern Colorado Plateau Network helps park managers know the answer. A report examined 10-year trends in water quality in the North Fork Virgin River, North Creek, and La Verkin Creek from 2006 to 2016--and the news was mostly good. Man crouches at edge of La Verkin Creek with sonde and sampling bottles. Grand Canyon National Park Centennial Briefings: California Condor Management During the summer of Grand Canyon National Park’s 2019 centennial, scientists and resource managers briefed fellow staff and the public about how they are helping to enable future generations to enjoy what is special about Grand Canyon. This article is from a transcript of a June 5, 2019 briefing about California condor management in Grand Canyon. Its conversational quality reflects the passion and personalities of the people behind the park. A black bird with its wings out sits perched on a tan rock, with a numbered tag visible on its wing. Series: Grand Canyon National Park Centennial Briefings During the summer of Grand Canyon National Park’s 2019 centennial, scientists and resource managers briefed fellow staff and the public about how they are helping to enable future generations to enjoy what is special about Grand Canyon. Black winged California Condor with a red head sits with its wings spread out. Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Mesozoic Era The Mesozoic Era (251.9 to 66 million years ago) was the "Age of Reptiles." During the Mesozoic, Pangaea began separating into the modern continents, and the modern Rocky Mountains rose. Dinosaurs, crocodiles, and pterosaurs ruled the land and air. As climate changed and rapid plate tectonics resulted in shallow ocean basins, sea levels rose world-wide and seas expanded across the center of North America. fossil dinosaur skull in rock face Series: NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Since 2002, the National Park Service (NPS) has awarded Environmental Achievement (EA) Awards to recognize staff and partners in the area of environmental preservation, protection and stewardship. A vehicle charges at an Electric Vehicle charging station at Thomas Edison National Historical Park Series: Park Uses of Geologic Information Geologic maps are critical to understanding a national park. Park staff use geologic maps for many purposes. These are just a few examples. colorful section of a geologic map of bryce canyon Series: Park Air Profiles Clean air matters for national parks around the country. Photo of clouds above the Grand Canyon, AZ NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Zion National Park, Utah Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. rock fomations Triassic Period—251.9 to 201.3 MYA The brightly colored Triassic rocks of Petrified Forest National Park yield not only the petrified trees but many other plant and animal fossils. fossil footprint on stone Mesozoic Era The Mesozoic Era (251.9 to 66 million years ago) was the "Age of Reptiles." During the Mesozoic, Pangaea began separating into the modern continents, and the modern Rocky Mountains rose. Dinosaurs, crocodiles, and pterosaurs ruled the land and air. As climate changed and rapid plate tectonics resulted in shallow ocean basins, sea levels rose world-wide and seas expanded across the center of North America. fossil dinosaur skull in rock face Landbird Population Trends in the Northern Colorado Plateau Network, 2020 Because birds can be sensitive to habitat change, they are good indicators of ecosystem integrity. The Northern Colorado Plateau Network partners with the University of Delaware to assess breeding-bird species trends in three different habitats: low-elevation riparian, pinyon-juniper, and sage shrubland. Find out which species were increasing and declining at network parks as of 2020. Small beige bird with black beak and feet, brown back. The Women Naturalists Only two early women park rangers made the transition to park naturalists. Having resigned her permanent ranger position after her marriage, Marguerite Lindsley Arnold returned to Yellowstone National Park under the temporary park ranger (naturalist) title from 1929 to 1931. Yosemite rehired Ranger Enid Michael as temporary naturalist each summer from 1928 to 1942. A handful of other parks hired a few new women under the newly created ranger-naturalist designation. Polly Mead, a woman park ranger-naturalist is giving a talk outdoors to a group of visitors. 1931 Who Wears the Pants Around Here? After a promising start in the early 1920s, only a handful of women were hired as park rangers and naturalists in the late 1920s and early 1930s. Carlsbad Caverns National Park and the national monuments of the Southwest became the new hot spots for women in uniformed positions in the 1930s. Women in skirts and pants Zero-Emissions Shuttle Buses Join the Zion National Park Fleet Visitors to Zion National Park will soon be able to explore the park by way of their new, battery-electric transit buses. Zion Shuttle Bus at Zion National Park World CA Condor Update – 2020 An update on the world California Condor population for 2020, compiled by our partners at the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service as of December 31, 2020. A close-up of the pink bald head of a California condor with a ruffle of black feathers. Monitoring From Space: Using Satellite Imagery to Measure Landscape Conditions on the Ground Scientists from the Northern Colorado Plateau Network travel thousands of miles each year to collect data on plants, soils, and water across network parks. But it would be impossible to cover every square inch of the Northern Colorado Plateau with boots on the ground. Instead, we simultaneously monitor the parks with boots in space—satellite data that provide information at a much broader scale. Satellite and Earth in space Localized Drought Impacts on Northern Colorado Plateau Landbirds Birds of the desert southwest, a climate-change hotspot, are among the most vulnerable groups in the US. To help park managers plan for those changes, scientists evaluated the influence of water deficit on landbird communities at 11 national parks in Utah and Colorado. The results will help land managers to focus conservation efforts on places where certain species are most vulnerable to projected climate changes. A man wearing a clipboard looks through binoculars at dawn in field of sagebrush Fossil Footprints Across Our Parks / Huellas Fósiles a Través de Nuestros Parques Join us on a virtual hike to see fossil footprints across our national parks! As we travel back in time, we’ll discover stories of fantastic pasts and learn that fossil footprints are worthy of protection for the future. <br><br> ¡Únase a nosotros en una caminata para ver huellas fósiles en nuestros parques nacionales! Mientras viajamos a través del tiempo, descubriremos historias de pasados fantásticos y aprenderemos que las huellas fósiles merecen ser conservadas para el futuro. Two primitive tetrapods, looking something like giant lizards walking through desert sand dunes. Resilience in a Time of Change: the CCC can Teach us How to Handle the Climate Crisis The Civilian Conservation Corps gave this country a capacity to respond and adapt during a crisis, and that is worth learning from as we face the future of human-caused climate change. Men working planting trees in a park housing area. Changing Patterns of Water Availability May Change Vegetation Composition in US National Parks Across the US, changes in water availability are altering which plants grow where. These changes are evident at a broad scale. But not all areas experience the same climate in the same way, even within the boundaries of a single national park. A new dataset gives park managers a valuable tool for understanding why vegetation has changed and how it might change in the future under different climate-change scenarios. Green, orange, and dead grey junipers in red soil, mountains in background Dare to Imagine: Shauna Ertolacci Meet Shauna Ertolacci, an Environmental Protection Specialist at Zion National Park who had to forsake the fear of the unknown to pursue her passion of preserving the environment. Read her story to find out what made this journey worth it. This article is part of a National Park Foundation funded project called the Dare to Imagine project dedicated to highlighting women in parks who are breaking barriers and showing what a scientist looks like. graphic of a young woman in the field. Text reads Shauna Ertolacci Zion National Park Water in the Desert: A Grassroots Movement to Protect the Virgin River Nestled against the southern border of Zion National Park, the community of Springdale, Utah is inextricably connected to the Virgin River. It is their source of drinking water, the foundation of their tourism economy, and a reminder of their pioneer history. With rapid commercial development encroaching on the river corridor, residents of this desert town, with help from the National Park Service, established conservation strategies via the Virgin River Management Plan. The Virgin River flowing through Zion National Park. Cinder Cones Cinder cones are typically simple volcanoes that consist of accumulations of ash and cinders around a vent. Sunset Crater Volcano and Capulin Volcano are cinder cones. photo of a dry grassy field with a cinder cone in the distance Women in Landscape-Scale Conservation: Cheryl Decker Cheryl Decker works hard to keep invasive plants from moving across boundaries. woman smiles at camera with rows of daffodils behind her A 20-year Partnership between the Utah Geological Survey and the National Park Service to Inventory and Monitor Fossil Resources in Utah's National Parks The Utah Geological Survey has worked in partnership with the National Park Service to document the fossils of Utah’s national parks for 20 years, helping to bring to light and protect a wide variety of fossils. photo of a person pointing at trace fossils in rock above on an over hanging rock World CA Condor Update – 2021 Population Status An update on the world California Condor population for 2021. The pink bald head of a California condor with a ruffle of black feathers by Don Sutherland Series: Park Paleontology News - Vol. 14, No. 1, Spring 2022 All across the park system, scientists, rangers, and interpreters are engaged in the important work of studying, protecting, and sharing our rich fossil heritage. <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/newsletters.htm">Park Paleontology news</a> provides a close up look at the important work of caring for these irreplaceable resources. <ul><li>Contribute to Park Paleontology News by contacting the <a href="https://www.nps.gov/common/utilities/sendmail/sendemail.cfm?o=5D8CD5B898DDBB8387BA1DBBFD02A8AE4FBD489F4FF88B9049&r=/subjects/geoscientistsinparks/photo-galleries.htm">newsletter editor</a></li><li>Learn more about <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/">Fossils & Paleontology</a> </li><li>Celebrate <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossilday/">National Fossil Day</a> with events across the nation</li></ul> photo of 2 people kneeling in shallow water at the base of a steep slope Pauline Mead Pauline "Polly" Mead fell in love with the Grand Canyon as a botany student. Her knowledge of the plants at the canyon, together with a connection to National Park Service (NPS) Director Stephen T. Mather, got her a job as the first woman ranger-naturalist at Grand Canyon National Park in 1930. Mead's formal NPS career was short because she married the park's assistant superintendent in 1931. As a "park wife" she continued to live and research in parks for another 25 years. Polly Mead in her NPS uniform examining a plant. Become a Zion B.A.R.K. Ranger Become a Zion B.A.R.K. Ranger! Two dogs on leash sit on a paved trail with Zion Canyon in the background. Volcanic Inverted Topography Inverted topography arises when lava flows that filled valleys at the time of their eruption later hold up mesas because their resistance to erosion is greater than most other rock types. photo of volcanic rock with petroglyphs and a distant mesa Series: Volcano Types Volcanoes vary in size from small cinder cones that stand only a few hundred feet tall to the most massive mountains on earth. photo of a volcanic mountain with snow and ice Monogenetic Volcanic Fields Monogenetic volcanic fields are areas covered by volcanic rocks where each of the volcanic vents typically only erupt once. Monogenetic volcanic fields typically contain cinder cones, fissure volcanoes, and/or maars and tuff rings. They also usually encompass large areas covered by basaltic lava flows. oblique aerial photo of a lava flow that extended into a body of water Ranger Roll Call, 1940-1949 Only a small number of women held temporary ranger positions in national parks during World War II. Carlsbad Caverns National Park, national monuments in the Southwest, and historical sites in the East continued to employ more women. Although a few women veterans benefitted from post-war veteran hiring programs, most veterans were men and permanent positions became even more difficult for women to get. Catherine Byrnes and Barbara Dickinson stand outside modeling the NPS uniform. Ranger Roll Call, 1950-1959 In the 1950s, women in uniform continue to work as guides, historians, and archeologists. Few women had permanent positions. A handful of women began to get seasonal ranger-naturalists positions at large national parks for the first time in two decades. Ann Livesay in her NPS uniform standing in front of a low wall at the edge of the Grand Canyon. Landbird Population Trends in the Northern Colorado Plateau Network, 2021 Because birds can be sensitive to habitat change, they are good indicators of ecosystem integrity. The Northern Colorado Plateau Network partners with the University of Delaware to assess breeding-bird species trends in three different habitats: low-elevation riparian, pinyon-juniper, and sage shrubland. Find out which species were increasing and declining at network parks as of 2021. Small dove with black spots on back of wings, long tail, and brownish-gray body. Series: Geologic Time—Major Divisions and NPS Fossils The National Park System contains a magnificent record of geologic time because rocks from each period of the geologic time scale are preserved in park landscapes. The geologic time scale is divided into four large periods of time—the Cenozoic Era, Mesozoic Era, Paleozoic Era, and The Precambrian. photo of desert landscape with a petrified wood log on the surface National Parks in Southern Utah Plan your visits to Southern Utah National Parks. Get details about permits, shuttles, and other information so that you know before you go! Guide to the Henry G. Peabody Photograph Collection Finding aid for the Henry G. Peabody Collection Guide to the Thomas J. Allen Photograph Collection Finding aid for the Thomas J. Allen Photographs in the NPS History Collection. Bipartisan Infrastructure Law funding ensures long-term success of native plants in Western U.S. national parks Thanks to funding from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, NPS projects in the West hope to collect native seeds to aide in accelerating repairs to damage due to wildfire, mining, flood, or other causes. A person reaches down into waist high, brown grasses to collect seeds Restoration and Recreation Project Underway at Zion National Park Funding from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, or BIL, enables Zion National Park to plan trails and conservation easements that will preserve sensitive plants, archeological features, and wildlife habitat between a new interagency visitor center planned for the east entrance and the surrounding public lands. A straight road with the Zion National Park entrance sign on the right. 50 Nifty Finds #9: Green Stamps Described by some as "the greatest propaganda campaign ever launched by the federal government to exploit the scenic wonders of the United States," the national park stamps issued by the U.S. Post Office Department in 1934 became one of the most recognized series of U.S. stamps. Despite being in the middle of the Great Depression, over one billion of the 10 national park stamps were printed in under two years. College of ten colorful national park stamps 50 Nifty Finds #13: The Artistry of Adult Coloring They say that coloring provides stress relief for adults as well as children. For artists at the National Park Service (NPS) Western Museum Laboratory in the 1930s, however, it wasn't easy to hand-color glass lanterns slides depicting the landscapes, people, plants, and animals of places they had never seen. Quality and accuracy were essential because the slides were used by rangers to illustrate lectures and to encourage people to visit national parks. Color image of a giant sequoia tree. The building and car at the base look tiny in comparison. 50 Nifty Finds #18: Portable Posters Many visitors to national parks today collect passport stamps, magnets, or other items to recall their trip and to show others where they’ve been. In the 1920s and 1930s the “must have” souvenirs weren’t created to be collected. National Park Service (NPS) windshield stickers served a practical administrative purpose; they were evidence that the automobile license fee drivers paid at some parks had been paid. Even so, Americans embraced their colorful, artistic designs. Four colorful Rocky Mountain National Park windshield stickers. World CA Condor Update – 2022 Population Status An update on the world California Condor population for 2022. A close-up of the pink bald head of a California condor with a ruffle of black feathers. Making an Impact: Long-Term Monitoring of Natural Resources at Intermountain Region National Parks, 2021 Across the Intermountain Region, Inventory & Monitoring Division ecologists are helping to track the effects of climate change, provide baseline information for resource management, evaluate new technologies, and inspire the next generation of park stewards. This article highlights accomplishments achieved during fiscal year 2021. A man looks through binoculars at sunrise. Harmful Algal Blooms: Science to Support Solutions from Shore to Shore The 11th U.S. Symposium on Harmful Algae, held October 23-28, in Albany, New York, gathered scientists from a range of disciplines and natural resource managers to discuss Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs). National Park Service and U.S. Geological Survey scientists presented on HAB science and management in national parks. six panelists stand in front of a projection screen Intern Spotlight: Estrella Sainburg Meet Estrella, a former Trails Planning and GIS Assistant with the Latino Heritage Internship Program! A young latina woman smiling, wearing a blue shirt with a statue behind her. Landbird Population Trends in the Northern Colorado Plateau Network, 2022 Because birds can be sensitive to habitat change, they are good indicators of ecosystem integrity. The Northern Colorado Plateau Network partners with the University of Delaware to assess breeding-bird species trends in three different habitats: low-elevation riparian, pinyon-juniper, and sage shrubland. Find out which species were increasing and declining at network parks as of 2022. Hairy woodpecker clings to the underside of a tree branch. A Changing Bimodal Climate Zone Means Changing Vegetation in Western National Parks When the climate changes enough, the vegetation communities growing in any given place will also change. Under an expanded bimodal climate zone, some plant communities in western national parks are more likely to change than others. National Park Service ecologists and partners investigated the future conditions that may force some of this change. Having this information can help park managers decide whether to resist, direct, or accept the change. Dark storm clouds and rainbow over mountains and saguaros. 2022 George and Helen Hartzog Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Service The National Park Service is pleased to congratulate the recipients of the 2022 George and Helen Hartzog Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Service. A montage of photos of volunteers working in a national park. Project Profile: Restoration and Recreation Connectivity in Zion National Park The National Park Service will utilize land protection and visitor use management techniques to plan and assess for watershed protection and trail creation on the east side of Zion National Park, where the park is seeing rapid visitor use and development. The goal of the effort is to connect a new multi-partner visitor center to the local community. red and white sandstone cliff with desert vegetation Project Profile: Increase Native Seed Production for Intermountain Region Parks The National Park Service will increase readily available supplies of genetically appropriate native seeds to support grassland, sagebrush, and southwestern desert restoration and climate adaptation in Intermountain Region parks. a row of people collecting seeds from shrubs in a grassy field My Park Story: Amy McKinney Amy McKinney, museum curator, shares her personal story of why she chose museum work and how she started her NPS career. A woman wearing a gray shirt and white gloves holds up an old, framed advertisement. 50 Nifty Finds #34: Poster Boy for Parks Photographer Ansel Adams is renowned for his black-and-white images of western American landscapes. His name conjures iconic images of national parks, particularly his beloved Yosemite. Although his 1941 mural project for the US Department of the Interior (DOI) is better known, Adams also worked with the National Park Service (NPS) to create a series of six posters. These affordable versions of Adams’ art provided priceless publicity for national parks. Black and white national parks usa poster featuring cliff dwelling Series: Park Paleontology News - Vol. 15, No. 2, Fall 2023 All across the park system, scientists, rangers, and interpreters are engaged in the important work of studying, protecting, and sharing our rich fossil heritage. <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/newsletters.htm">Park Paleontology news</a> provides a close up look at the important work of caring for these irreplaceable resources. <ul><li>Contribute to Park Paleontology News by contacting the <a href="https://www.nps.gov/common/utilities/sendmail/sendemail.cfm?o=5D8CD5B898DDBB8387BA1DBBFD02A8AE4FBD489F4FF88B9049&r=/subjects/geoscientistsinparks/photo-galleries.htm">newsletter editor</a></li><li>Learn more about <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/">Fossils & Paleontology</a> </li><li>Celebrate <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossilday/">National Fossil Day</a> with events across the nation</li></ul> Photo of a boulder with a dinosaur track on one side. New Navajo Sandstone-Themed Electric Shuttle Bus Transports Visitors Back in Time at Zion National Park Zion National Park is converting its bus fleet to electric vehicles, and each new bus will have a distinct visual theme. One of the themes is the life of the Navajo Sandstone, a rock formation that makes up many iconic landforms at the park. The artwork, created by paleoartist Brian Engh, includes dinosaurs and other animals that left tracks and burrows in the sand, as well as plants. Photo of a bus with zion park name and fossil mural. 50 Nifty Finds #35: On the Same Track In 1915 Stephen T. Mather was hired by Secretary of Interior Franklin K. Lane to build public and political support for a new bureau for national parks. To implement his vision, Mather called on an industry with a track record in publicizing western national parks—the nation’s railroad companies. Brochure cover for Glacier National Park hotels and tours featuring a large inn I Didn't Know That!: Biological Soil Crusts You’ve heard people say to stay on the trail, but what does it matter in the desert? It’s just dirt... right? Wrong—it's alive! Discover what biological soil crusts are and why they're so important in dry environments. a promo image for "I Didn't Know That! Biological Soil Crusts" with image of a biological soil crust 50 Nifty Finds #38: A Germ of an Idea A lot of articles have been written about the history of the National Park Service (NPS) arrowhead emblem. Many recycle the same content and outdated information that has largely come from the NPS itself. Challenging the traditional story has revealed new sources of information—and two previously overlooked arrowhead designs—that rewrite the arrowhead origin story. Wooden arrowhead plaque on stand 50 Nifty Finds #39: An NPS Art Factory Between 1938 and 1941 the National Park Service (NPS) Western Museum Laboratories (WML) created many iconic posters. Often described as “the WPA park posters,” they should be called “the WML posters.” Research reveals more designs than previously thought (including several previously unknown ones), reevaluates what is known about the artists, and argues that modern reproductions have made the designs more significant to NPS graphic identity today than they were in the past. Poster with a purple El Capitan at Yosemite The Devoted People behind Big Data in National Parks Citizen science volunteers collect massive amounts of crucial scientific information. They gather it from sources as varied as oceans, mountainsides, and historic archives. Smart new tools are making their contributions even more powerful. Two smiling women stand in front of a national park sign.
Zion Zion National Park Utah National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior All this is the music of waters. John Wesley Powell, 1895 Large photo: Towers of the Virgin and The West Temple © TOM BEAN Wrought by Water multiplies with each slope, aspect, and soil type, with each minute change in precipitation or tempera­ ture. Add to these infuences species from nearby ecosystems, and Zion becomes an assemblage of plants, and thus of animals, found nowhere else exactly like this. Although the southwestern desert may look homo­ geneous, each fold, wrinkle, bend, slope, mesa top, and canyon bottom creates its unique conditions. This un­ likely desert harbors a mosaic of envi­ ronments, each fne­tuned to place. Welcome to the one called Zion. More than the river’s music and the soaring heights alone, Zion’s nature GREAT D A R s Pink Clif f Zion National Whi e Cliff n Ca Vi r n gi Ri n n li s ver Ver milio n Cliffs th 3,100 ft 945 m Zion • COLORADO PLATEAU NAVAJO SANDSTONE Stratigraphy, The Kolob Canyons and Hurricane Clifs (photo above and diagram at left) are at the western edge of the massive, uplifted Colorado Plateau (map at left). Zion Canyon Kayenta mudstone features dinosaur tracks. KAYENTA FORMATION Zion. These rocks formed in environ­ Lower Moenave deposits testify to pooling waters; upper ones indicate swift­moving foods. MOENAVE FORMATION ments as varied as sand dunes and CHINLE FORMATION Chinle Formation shales are soft and contain petrifed wood. PETRIFIED FOREST MEMBER © DAViD PETTiT Shinarump Conglomerate is composed of varied sizes of eroded Moenkopi rubble. SHINARUMP CONGLOMERATE MOENKOPI FORMATION Westward expansion eventually brought new settlers to the canyon. In the 1860s, early Mormon pioneers came to the region and built small communities and farmed the river terraces. Through hard work and faith, the new residents endured in a landscape where fash foods de­ stroyed towns and drought burned crops. The same threats exist today, but Zion daily draws new explorers to experience the beauty and the sanctuary of this place that countless generations have considered home. Zion’s beauty and bounty have beckoned to humans over a great span of time. This corn and its storage jar, found in the park, are over 1,000 years old. NPS LiBRARY OF CONGRESS as Ancestral Puebloans. The diverse geological setting gave them a com­ bination rare in deserts: terraces to grow food, a river for water, and an adequate growing season. On the Colorado Plateau, crops grow best between 5,000 and 7,000 feet of ele­ vation, which makes Zion’s elevations nearly ideal. But drought, resource depletion, and migrations eventually decreased the Ancestral Puebloans’ dominance. The Southern Paiute peo­ ple who followed brought traditions suited to the harsh desert climate and thrived here. Virgin River The Moenkopi Formation records a shallow sea withdrawing, so the marine fossils differ in its bottom and top layers. NPS In a Haven of Habitats People have occupied the landscape of what is now Zion National Park for thousands of years. Zion’s frst resi­ dents tracked mammoths, camels, and other mammals though open desert and sheltered canyons. With climate change, disease, and overhunting, these animals died out 8,000 years ago. Hunters adapted by hunting smaller animals and gathering food. As resources kept diminishing, people adjusted to suit their location. One desert culture, evident here still, evolved over the next 1,500 years as a community of farmers now known The Vermilion Clifs, White Clifs, and Pink Clifs (diagram at left) are part of the Grand Staircase, the southwestern edge of the Colorado Plateau. The Bryce Canyon and Cedar Breaks amphitheaters are etched into the Pink Clifs at the top of the Grand Staircase. Navajo sandstone’s sweeping lines of contrasting color record the move­ ments of sand dunes. the study of rock layers, reveals the relative age of the rocks before you at s yo Park ff Nor Zio © TOM TiLL Kolob Canyons TEMPLE CAP FORMATION shallow sea bottoms. Bryce Canyon National Park Cedar Breaks National Monument rric a n e C Long before today’s landscape even appeared, streams, oceans, deserts, and volcanos deposited thousands of feet of mud, lime, sand, and ash. The immense pressure and heat of accu­ mulating sediments turned lower lay­ ers to stone. Later, underground forces uplifted the Colorado Plateau, a 130,000­square­mile mass of rock, over 10,000 feet above sea level. Rain’s watery fngers then worked the Plateau’s minute cracks, loosening grains and widening fractures—and eroding today’s mighty canyons. These processes continue; rivers still deposit sediments that turn to stone, earthquakes still punctuate the Pla­ teau’s upward journey, and erosion pries rockfalls from Zion’s seemingly immutable cliffs. Eventually, this beautiful canyon will melt away and others will form. All it takes is time. DESERT 11,307 ft 3,446 m
Zion Information Guide Hiking Guide   Shuttle   Stop Zion Canyon Shuttle Hike Round Trip Location Average Time Elevation Description Change EASY 1 Pa’rus Trail Visitor Center to Canyon Junction 2 hours 3.5 mi / 5.6 km 50 ft / 15 m 5 Lower Emerald Pool Trail Zion Lodge 1 hour 1.2 mi / 1.9 km 69 ft / 21 m The Grotto Trail Zion Lodge The Grotto 0.5 hour 1 mi / 1.6 km Weeping Rock Trail Weeping Rock 0.5 hour 0.4 mi / 0.6 km 6 7 9 Riverside Walk Temple of Sinawava National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Paved trail follows the Virgin River from the Visitor Center to Canyon Junction. Leads to the pools below Middle Emerald Pools and the Upper Emerald Pools Trails. 35 ft / 11 m 98 ft / 30 m 57 ft / 17 m 1.5 hour 2.2 mi / 3.5 km SHUTTLE SCHEDULE Subject to change. Check website for current hours March 11 to May 20 May 21 to September 17 September 18 to November 4 First bus into the canyon from the Zion Canyon Visitor Center 7:00 a.m. 6:00 a.m. 7:00 a.m. Last bus into the canyon from the Zion Canyon Visitor Center 5:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m. 5:00 p.m. Last bus out of the canyon from Temple of Sinawava 7:15 p.m. 8:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m. First bus from Majestic View Lodge 8:00 a.m. 7:00 a.m. 8:00 a.m. Last bus leaves Zion Canyon Village 7:00 p.m. 8:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m. This short trail parallels the roadway, connecting the Zion Lodge to the Grotto. It is located behind the shuttle stop. Town of Springdale shuttle hours Short, but steep. Minor drop-offs. Paved trail ends at a rock alcove with dripping springs. Sections may be icy in winter. The Narrows Paved trail follows the Virgin River in a deep canyon. First 0.4 miles is wheelchair accessible but may be sandy. Distance From Visitor Center Riverside Walk W es tR 9 im Tr a Kayenta Trail The Grotto 1.5 hour 2 mi / 3.2 km 150 ft / 46 m Middle Emerald Pool Trail Zion Lodge 1.5 hour 2.2 mi / 3.5 km 150 ft/ 45 m Upper Emerald Pool Trail Zion Lodge 1 hour 1 mi / 1.6 km 200 ft/ 61 m Moderate drop-offs. An unpaved climb to the Emerald Pools. Connects the Grotto to the Emerald Pools Trails. 9 3 hours 4.2 mi / 6.2 km The Narrows (via Riverside Walk) Temple of Sinawava 334 ft / 102 m Lower Emerald Pools Trail No swimming Jacob Peak 6831ft (2083m) Isaac Peak 6825ft (2081m) Out and back hike. River n Zi Museum 1.7 Miles 2.7 km Down-canyon 2 shuttle ONLY KOLOB CANYONS HIKING TRAILS Timber Creek Overlook Trail Kolob Canyons Road 0.5 hour 1 mi / 1.6 km 100 ft/ 30 m Follows a ridge to views of Timber Creek, Kolob Terrace, and the Pine Valley Mountains. Taylor Creek Trail Kolob Canyons Road 3.5 hours 5.0 mi / 8.0 km 450 ft/ 137 m Maximum 12 people per group. Follows the Middle Fork of Taylor Creek past two homestead cabins to Double Arch Alcove. 8 hours 14 mi / 22.5 km Camp Court of the 4 Patriarchs Abraham Peak 6890ft (2101m) Long drop-offs. Not for young children or anyone afraid of heights. You are responsible for checking weather, water levels, and flash flood potential before attempting. This hike is in the river and subject to dangerous flash floods. 5 No swimming Hikers need a permit to go to Angels Landing. Use QR code on back to apply. Up to 8 hrs 9.4 mi / 15.1km 6 Zion Lodge Middle Emerald Pools Trail 4.3 Miles 6.9 km Minor drop-offs. A sandy and rocky trail that climbs to the Upper Emerald Pool at the base of a cliff. No swimming. 1000 ft/ 305 m Trail Rim West l Tra i No swimming 3.2 Miles 5.1 km Scout Lookout via West Rim Trail The Grotto The Grotto nta Upper Emerald Pools Trail An unpaved climb to a sandstone ledge that parallels the lower trail at a higher elevation. STRENUOUS 6 4.9 Miles 7.9 km ye Hike atop a massive landslide under The Sentinel. Minor drop-offs. Commercial horse trail from March to October. Ka 466 ft / 142 m 7 5990ft (1765m) Ca n yon S c e ni c rt h Dr Fork iv e Vir gin 4 hours 7.6 mi / 12.2 km Private vehicles are not allowed on the Scenic Drive beyond Canyon Junction when shuttle buses are in service. Weeping Rock Angels Landing No 5 Sand Bench Trail Zion Lodge Tra il 5 Minor drop-offs. Ends at viewpoint of the Towers of the Virgin, lower Zion Canyon, and Springdale. Weeping Rock Grotto Trail 6 368 ft / 112 m 6.6 Miles 10.6 km on 5 2 hours 3.3 mi / 5.3 km This is where the West Rim Trail splits from the Angels Landing Trail. 0.5 mi to Angels Landing from this point. ch 1 Watchman Trail Zion Canyon Visitor Center Minor drop-offs and handrails. Ends at a viewpoint into lower Zion Canyon. Parking is limited. Sand Be East Side 163 ft / 50 m Down-canyon shuttle ONLY 8 Scout Lookout 1 hour 1.0 mi / 1.6 km For most of the year, the Zion Canyon Scenic Drive is open to shuttle buses ONLY. Big Bend il MODERATE Canyon Overlook East side of Zion Tunnel Temple of Sinawava (Accessible with assistance) 7.7 Miles 12.4 km Zion Canyon Scenic Drive East Entrance Canyon Junction Down-canyon shuttle ONLY 3 C
Zion Information Guide Hiking Guide Zion Canyon Shuttle Hike Round Trip Location Average Time Elevation Description Change 1 Pa’rus Trail Visitor Center to Canyon Junction 2 hours 3.5 mi / 5.6 km 50 ft / 15 m Paved trail follows the Virgin River from the Visitor Center to Canyon Junction. 5 Lower Emerald Pool Trail Zion Lodge 1 hour 1.2 mi / 1.9 km 69 ft / 21 m Leads to the pools below Middle Emerald Pools and the Upper Emerald Pools Trails. The Grotto Trail Zion Lodge The Grotto 0.5 hour 1 mi / 1.6 km 35 ft / 11 m Weeping Rock Trail Weeping Rock 0.5 hour 0.4 mi / 0.6 km 98 ft / 30 m 7 9 November 6 to November 27 November 28 to December 22 December 23 to January 1 First bus into the canyon from the Zion Canyon Visitor Center 7:00 a.m. Out of service 8:00 a.m. Last bus into the canyon from the Zion Canyon Visitor Center 4:00 p.m. Out of service 3:00 p.m. Last bus out of the canyon from Temple of Sinawava 6:15 p.m. Out of service 5:45 p.m. First bus from Majestic View Lodge 8:00 a.m. Out of service 8:10 a.m. Last bus leaves Zion Canyon Village 6:30 p.m. Out of service 6:00 p.m. Last bus leaves Majestic View Lodge 6:15 p.m. Out of service 5:45 p.m. Subject to change. Check website for current hours EASY 6 SHUTTLE SCHEDULE Riverside Walk Temple of Sinawava This short trail parallels the roadway, connecting the Zion Lodge to the Grotto. It is located behind the shuttle stop. Short, but steep. Minor drop-offs. Paved trail ends at a rock alcove with dripping springs. Sections may be icy in winter. 57 ft / 17 m 1.5 hour 2.2 mi / 3.5 km Paved trail follows the Virgin River in a deep canyon. First 0.4 miles is wheelchair accessible but may be sandy. Town of Springdale shuttle hours The Narrows Distance From Visitor Center Riverside Walk W es 7.7 Miles 12.4 km tR 9 im MODERATE Minor drop-offs. Ends at viewpoint of the Towers of the Virgin, lower Zion Canyon, and Springdale. Sand Bench Trail Zion Lodge 4 hours 7.6 mi / 12.2 km 466 ft / 142 m Hike atop a massive landslide under The Sentinel. Minor drop-offs. Commercial horse trail from March to October. 4.9 Miles 7.9 km 1 hour 1 mi / 1.6 km An unpaved climb to a sandstone ledge that parallels the lower trail at a higher elevation. 200 ft/ 61 m Jacob Peak 6831ft (2083m) Isaac Peak 6825ft (2081m) 3 hours 4.2 mi / 6.2 km The Narrows (via Riverside Walk) Temple of Sinawava 1000 ft/ 305 m River Long drop-offs. Not for young children or anyone afraid of heights. Hikers need a permit to go to Angels Landing. Use QR code on back to apply. Up to 8 hrs 9.4 mi / 15.1km 334 ft / 102 m You are responsible for checking weather, water levels, and flash flood potential before attempting. This hike is in the river and subject to dangerous flash floods. Out and back hike. Museum 1.7 Miles 2.7 km Down-canyon 2 shuttle ONLY Follows a ridge to views of Timber Creek, Kolob Terrace, and the Pine Valley Mountains. Taylor Creek Trail Kolob Canyons Road 3.5 hours 5.0 mi / 8.0 km 450 ft/ 137 m Maximum 12 people per group. Follows the Middle Fork of Taylor Creek past two homestead cabins to Double Arch Alcove. 8 hours 14 mi / 22.5 km Camp Kolob Arch via La Verkin Creek Trail mileage 2.5 mi Trail Lee Pass Hiking Trail 1037 Cft/ re e k 316 m Maximum 12 people per group. Follows Timber and La Verkin Creek. A side trail leads to Kolob Arch. Kolob Canyons N rth Taylor Creek Located in the northwest corner of the park off of Interstate 15 via exit 40, the five-mile scenic drive climbs past the spectacular canyons and red rocks of the Kolob Canyons area and ends at the Kolob Canyons Viewpoint. Fo k T yl o r C re ek T Midd rai le F ork Exit 40 Kolob Canyons Visitor Center Lee Pass Trailhead Fork Pets are prohibited on all trails. Group size illis is 12 people. limit on wilderness W trails Cre e k Trai l 15 0 e L a V r ki n C re ek eek 1 3 Clinic 0.4 Miles 0.8 km 0.8 Miles 1.29 km 4 Watchman Campground 5 1.0 Miles 1.6 km 6 1.4 Miles 2.25 km Kolob Reservoir k Cr ee Cr 1 2 0.2 Miles 0.3 km 7 SPRINGDALE throughout P Parking the town of Springdale rmel High w a y ey il Tra 2.8 Miles 4.5 km Zion-Mt. Carmel Tunnel Large Vehicle Escort Tunnel times and size restrictions on other side. No bikes/pedestrians allowed in the tunnel. a Zion Canyon Visitor Center 9 Lava Point North 0 0.5 Kilometer 0 0.5 Mile Shuttle Information Park shuttle stop Zion Canyon shuttle route Springdale shuttle stop Springdale shuttle route Paved road open to private vehicles Tunnel Hiking trail Biking To 15 Kolob Canyons, St George, and Las Vegas La Po va in t R West Rim Trailhead d Lava Point m Hiking 9 6.5 mi nt Ca Other Visitor Information 8 ll Va ki n La Ver Beatty Spring n -Mou Watch Zion Canyon Village 2.3 Miles 3.7 km 0.3 mi 89 Zio South Entrance 1.8 mi Kolob Arch 0.6 mi To: Kanab Grand Canyon Bryce Canyon South Campground 1.8 Miles 2.9 km 6.4 mi Canyon
Zion Information Guide National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Hiking Guide Hike Round Trip Location Average Time Elevation Description Gain SHUTTLE SCHEDULE September 19 to November 5 November 6 to November 27 First bus into the canyon from the Zion Canyon Visitor Center 7:00am 7:00am Last bus into the canyon from the Zion Canyon Visitor Center 5:00pm 4:00pm Last bus out of the canyon from Temple of Sinawava 7:15pm 6:15pm Town of Springdale shuttle hours 8:00am to 8:00pm 8:00am to 7:00pm Subject to change. Check website for current hours EASY 1 Pa’rus Trail Visitor Center to Canyon Junction 2 hours 3.5 mi / 5.6 km 50 ft / 15 m Paved trail follows the Virgin River from the Visitor Center to Canyon Junction. 6 The Grotto Trail Zion Lodge The Grotto 0.5 hour 1 mi / 1.6 km 35 ft / 11 m This short trail parallels the roadway, connecting the Zion Lodge to the Grotto. It is located behind the shuttle stop. 5 Lower Emerald Pool Trail Zion Lodge 1 hour 1.2 mi / 1.9 km 69 ft / 21 m Leads to the pools below Middle Emerald Pools and the Upper Emerald Pools Trails. 9 Riverside Walk Temple of Sinawava 1.5 hour 2.2 mi / 3.5 km 57 ft / 17 m Paved trail follows the Virgin River in a deep canyon. First 0.4 miles is wheelchair accessible but may be sandy. Shuttles are out of service from November 28 to December 22 The Narrows MODERATE Tr a il Big Bend 6.6 Miles 10.6 km 1.5 hour 2 mi / 3.2 km 150 ft / 46 m Moderate drop-offs. An unpaved climb to the Emerald Pools. Connects the Grotto to the Emerald Pools Trails. Middle Emerald Pool Trail Zion Lodge 1.5 hour 2.2 mi / 3.5 km 150 ft/ 45 m An unpaved climb to a sandstone ledge that parallels the lower trail at a higher elevation. Upper Emerald Pool Trail Zion Lodge 1 hour 1 mi / 1.6 km 200 ft/ 61 m Weeping Rock CLOSED Angels Landing 4.9 Miles 7.9 km Minor drop-offs. A sandy and rocky trail that climbs to the Upper Emerald Pool at the base of a cliff. No swimming. Upper Emerald Pools Trail 3 hours 4.2 mi / 6.2 km The Narrows (via Riverside Walk) Temple of Sinawava 5 Jacob Peak 6831ft (2083m) Hikers need a permit to go to Angels Landing. Use QR code on back to apply. Up to 8 hrs 9.4 mi / 15.1km 334 ft / 102 m You are responsible for checking weather, water levels, and flash flood potential before attempting. This hike is in the river and subject to dangerous flash floods. Out and back hike. Isaac Peak 6825ft (2081m) 3.2 Miles 5.1 km Tra il ch Taylor Creek Trail Kolob Canyons Road 3.5 hours 5.0 mi / 8.0 km 450 ft/ 137 m 8 hours 14 mi / 22.5 km Camp Paved road Kolob Arch via La Verkin Creek Trail mileage 2.5 mi Trail Lee Pass Hiking Trail Follows a ridge to views of Timber Creek, Kolob Terrace, and the Pine Valley Mountains. Maximum 12 people per group. Follows the Middle Fork of Taylor Creek past two homestead cabins to Double Arch Alcove. 1037 Cft/ re e k 316 m n on 100 ft/ 30 m Sand Be 0.5 hour 1 mi / 1.6 km Court of the 4 Patriarchs Abraham Peak 6890ft (2101m) KOLOB CANYONS HIKING TRAILS Timber Creek Overlook Trail Kolob Canyons Road 6 No swimming Long drop-offs. Not for young children or anyone afraid of heights. 1000 ft/ 305 m Private vehicles are not allowed on the Scenic Drive beyond Canyon Junction when shuttle buses are in service. Zion Lodge Middle Emerald Pools Trail No swimming Lower Emerald Pools Trail Scout Lookout via West Rim Trail The Grotto For most of the year, the Zion Canyon Scenic Drive is open to shuttle buses ONLY. The Grotto No swimming 4.3 Miles 6.9 km Zion Canyon Scenic Drive 5990ft (1765m) l Kayenta Trail The Grotto Down-canyon shuttle ONLY 8 This is where the West Rim Trail splits from the Angels Landing Trail. 0.5 mi to Angels Landing from this point. River 9 im Scout Lookout Hike atop a massive landslide under The Sentinel. Minor drop-offs. Commercial horse trail from March to October. STRENUOUS 6 9 Trail 466 ft / 142 m tR Rim West 4 hours 7.6 mi / 12.2 km W es 7.7 Miles 12.4 km Tra i Sand Bench Trail Zion Lodge Minor drop-offs. Ends at viewpoint of the Towers of the Virgin, lower Zion Canyon, and Springdale. Temple of Sinawava (Accessible with assistance) Grotto Trail 5 368 ft / 112 m Riverside Walk Distance From Visitor Center nta 5 2 hours 3.3 mi / 5.3 km Map of Zion Canyon ye 6 Watchman Trail Zion Canyon Visitor Center Minor drop-offs and handrails. Ends at a viewpoint into lower Zion Canyon. Parking is limited. Ka 5 163 ft / 50 m n yon S c e ni c rt h Dr Fork iv e Vir gin 1 1 hour 1.0 mi / 1.6 km Zi No East Side Canyon Overlook East side of Zion Tunnel Ca   Shuttle   Stop Zion Canyon Shuttle Museum 1.7 Miles 2.7 km Down-canyon 2 shuttle ONLY East Entrance Canyon Junction Down-canyon shuttle ONLY 3 To: Kanab Grand Canyon Bryce Canyon No private vehicles beyond the gate when shuttles are in service 89 Zio n -Mou nt Ca rmel High w a y Pa’rus Trail Maximum 12 peopl
Zion Information Guide Hiking Guide   Shuttle   Stop National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Zion Canyon Shuttle Information Hike Round Trip Location Average Time Elevation Description Gain SHUTTLE SCHEDULE Subject to change. Check website for current hours EASY March 19 to May 21 May 22 to September 18 September 19 to November 5 1 Pa’rus Trail Visitor Center to Canyon Junction 2 hours 3.5 mi / 5.6 km 50 ft / 15 m Paved trail follows the Virgin River from the Visitor Center to Canyon Junction. First bus into the canyon from the Zion Canyon Visitor Center 7:00am 6:00am 7:00am 6 The Grotto Trail Zion Lodge The Grotto 0.5 hour 1 mi / 1.6 km 35 ft / 11 m This short trail parallels the roadway, connecting the Zion Lodge to the Grotto. It is located behind the shuttle stop. Last bus into the canyon from the Zion Canyon Visitor Center 5:00pm 6:00pm 5:00pm 5 Lower Emerald Pool Trail Zion Lodge 1 hour 1.2 mi / 1.9 km 69 ft / 21 m Leads to the pools below Middle Emerald Pools and the Upper Emerald Pools Trails. Last bus out of the canyon from Temple of Sinawava 7:15pm 8:15pm 7:15pm 9 Riverside Walk Temple of Sinawava 1.5 hour 2.2 mi / 3.5 km 57 ft / 17 m Paved trail follows the Virgin River in a deep canyon. First 0.4 miles is wheelchair accessible but may be sandy. Town of Springdale shuttle hours 8:00am to 8:00pm 7:00am to 9:00pm 8:00am to 8:00pm The Narrows MODERATE Hike atop a massive landslide under The Sentinel. Minor drop-offs. Commercial horse trail from March to October. Kayenta Trail The Grotto 1.5 hour 2 mi / 3.2 km 150 ft / 46 m Moderate drop-offs. An unpaved climb to the Emerald Pools. Connects the Grotto to the Emerald Pools Trails. Middle Emerald Pool Trail Zion Lodge 1.5 hour 2.2 mi / 3.5 km 150 ft/ 45 m An unpaved climb to a sandstone ledge that parallels the lower trail at a higher elevation. Upper Emerald Pool Trail Zion Lodge 1 hour 1 mi / 1.6 km 200 ft/ 61 m 9 il Big Bend 6.6 Miles 10.6 km Weeping Rock CLOSED 4.9 Miles 7.9 km Upper Emerald Pools Trail Angels Landing The Narrows (via Riverside Walk) Temple of Sinawava 334 ft / 102 m You are responsible for checking weather, water levels, and flash flood potential before attempting. This hike is in the river and subject to dangerous flash floods. Out and back hike. 5 Jacob Peak 6831ft (2083m) Isaac Peak 6825ft (2081m) 3.2 Miles 5.1 km Tra il ch Taylor Creek Trail Kolob Canyons Road 3.5 hours 5.0 mi / 8.0 km 450 ft/ 137 m 8 hours 14 mi / 22.5 km Camp Paved road Hiking Trail Kolob Arch via La Verkin Creek Trail mileage 2.5 mi Trail Lee Pass Follows a ridge to views of Timber Creek, Kolob Terrace, and the Pine Valley Mountains. Maximum 12 people per group. Follows the Middle Fork of Taylor Creek past two homestead cabins to Double Arch Alcove. 1037 Cft/ re e k 316 m n on 100 ft/ 30 m Sand Be 0.5 hour 1 mi / 1.6 km Court of the 4 Patriarchs Abraham Peak 6890ft (2101m) KOLOB CANYONS HIKING TRAILS Timber Creek Overlook Trail Kolob Canyons Road 6 No swimming Hikers need a permit to go to Angels Landing. Use QR code on back to apply. Up to 8 hrs 9.4 mi / 15.1km Private vehicles are not allowed on the Scenic Drive beyond Canyon Junction when shuttle buses are in service. Zion Lodge Middle Emerald Pools Trail No swimming Long drop-offs. Not for young children or anyone afraid of heights. 1000 ft/ 305 m For most of the year, the Zion Canyon Scenic Drive is open to shuttle buses ONLY. The Grotto Lower Emerald Pools Trail 3 hours 4.2 mi / 6.2 km Zion Canyon Scenic Drive 5990ft (1765m) No swimming 4.3 Miles 6.9 km Scout Lookout via West Rim Trail The Grotto Down-canyon shuttle ONLY 8 Scout Lookout River 6 Tr a This is where the West Rim Trail splits from the Angels Landing Trail. 0.5 mi to Angels Landing from this point. Minor drop-offs. A sandy and rocky trail that climbs to the Upper Emerald Pool at the base of a cliff. No swimming. STRENUOUS im Trail 466 ft / 142 m 9 Rim West 4 hours 7.6 mi / 12.2 km tR l Sand Bench Trail Zion Lodge Minor drop-offs. Ends at viewpoint of the Towers of the Virgin, lower Zion Canyon, and Springdale. W es 7.7 Miles 12.4 km Tra i 368 ft / 112 m Temple of Sinawava (Accessible with assistance) Grotto Trail 5 2 hours 3.3 mi / 5.3 km Riverside Walk Distance From Visitor Center nta 5 Watchman Trail Zion Canyon Visitor Center Minor drop-offs and handrails. Ends at a viewpoint into lower Zion Canyon. Parking is limited. ye 6 163 ft / 50 m Ka 5 1 hour 1.0 mi / 1.6 km Ca n yon S c e ni c rt h Dr Fork iv e Vir gin 1 Canyon Overlook East side of Zion Tunnel Zi No East Side Map of Zion Canyon Museum 1.7 Miles 2.7 km Down-canyon 2 shuttle ONLY East Entrance Canyon Junction Down-canyon shuttle ONLY 3 To: Kanab Grand Canyon Bryce Canyon No private vehicles beyond the gate when shuttles are in service 89 Zio n -Mou nt Ca rmel High w a y Pa’rus Trail Maximum 1
Zion National Park Official Centennial Newspaper National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior A Century of Sanctuary 1909–2009 Isaac Loren Covington, untitled, 1929, oil on canvas. Collection of Hal Canon and Teresa Jordan This special edition newspaper highlights the last 100 years of events, people, and places of Zion National Park, but the timeline of Zion began much earlier. Humans, who have inhabited southern Utah for over 10,000 years, continue to visit this mysterious canyon. Why? Originally it wasn’t to hike or take pictures, rock climb or rest. Food and water…it was as simple as that. Human survival meant gleaning from the land its scant harvests. Archaic peoples, Ancestral Puebloans, and Southern Paiutes, the latter inhabiting this area for the last several hundred years, had extensive and intuitive knowledge of the plants, animals, and seasons. Homes were temporary brush shelters used for sleeping or to escape the heat. As they observed their surroundings, they knew they could “make a living.” They would hunt, fish, gather, and grow modest crops. Whatever was necessary to ensure their survival was used, but the harvest did not begin until asking and thanking the generous bounty. This ancient way of life is gone now. Today, when traveling through on vacation, our temporary home isn’t a brush shelter but a tent or motel. We graze on granola rather than rice grass. Our water source comes from a tap, not the natural springs in the rocks. We don’t need to forage in order to live. But what may not have changed is a deeply felt, personal experience after we set foot here: the sound of the song of a river; a canyon wren scolding us; the subtle perfumery of sagebrush and juniper; the sight of cliffs that make us think big and feel small. Yet here we stand, mouths agape, eyes wide. What will your harvest be? Joy, relief, excitement, challenge? Unlike our earliest visitors, we come to collect not things but knowledge, not resources but memories, not trophies but satisfaction. Zion National Park has shed its winter whites, brushed off the dry remains of last season’s display, and opened its arms to you. The sun warms the ground. Buds and birds return once more. A quiet liveliness rustles and shuffles through the park. This year is special. We have the chance to reflect on the last century of what it has meant to come to this place. A Century of Sanctuary—1909 to 2009—includes the millions of people who have made their journey to Zion and, in many ways, made their mark. From the initial establishment of Mukuntuweap National Monument in 1909 to this year’s gala packed with events, dedications, and programs; we can know, always, that we have an unchanging landscape to visit. With all the changes in the world, we can take comfort in returning to this spot. We can believe that, even though our personal world may be unsettled, sitting and gazing deep into the soul of this canyon, we might find contentment— we might find peace. John Muir suggests: “Keep close to Nature’s heart... and break clear away, once in awhile, and climb a mountain or spend a week in the woods. Wash your spirit clean.” May your spirit be renewed and soar as high as the highest cliffs. May this visit to your park be a remarkable experience. To conserve the scenery and the natural and historic objects and the wild life therein and to provide for the enjoyment of the same in such manner and by such means as will leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of future generations. National Park Service Organic Act 1916 Zion National Park Altar of Sacrifice Superintendent Jock Whitworth Mailing Address Zion National Park Springdale, Utah 84767 Web Site www.nps.gov/zion Park Headquarters 435 772-3256 Fax 435 772-3426 E-mail ZION_park_information@nps.gov Printing made possible by the National Park Foundation. Printed on recycled paper with soy ink. Please recycle again. Special Thanks Robin Hampton, Jacqueline Drake, Holly Baker, Adrienne Fitzgerald, Mike Large, Jennifer Aguayo, Karen Mayne, Ron Terry, Tiffany Taylor, J.L. Crawford, Betsy Ehrlich, and all the staff of Zion National Park, present and past. ZNP 3-24-09 Part of the Towers and Temples of the Virgin, behind the Human History Museum, this distinctive cliff was named for the red iron oxide streaking down its front. The streaking of minerals washed down the cliff confers the appearance of blood on a sacrificial altar. Angels Landing Named by Methodist Minister Frederick Vining Fisher during an excursion up Zion Canyon in 1916. Fisher was accompanied by two Rockville boys acting as guides, Claud Hirschi and Ethelbert Bingham. After Fisher praised the striking presence of the Great White Throne he turned toward what would soon become Angels Landing and stated “The Angels would never land on the throne, but would reverently pause at the foot [of Angels Landing].” believed he was the first Anglo to explore this far up canyon noting, “the narrows… the most wonderful defile [gorge] it has been
Zion National Park National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Wilderness Guide The Official Wilderness Guide of Zion National Park Contents Page 1 Pages 2-3 Pages 4-5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Wilderness Permits Canyoneering & Climbing Zion Wilderness Map Wilderness Backpacking The Zion Narrows Safety & Flash Floods NPS Image/Avery Sloss Welcome to the Zion National Park Wilderness Zion is a spectacular network of colorful canyons, forested mesas, and striking deserts. All of the land within the park boundary is preserved by the National Park Service for the benefit of the public. In addition, a remarkable 84 percent of this extraordinary landscape is preserved as Wilderness. This designation ensures that over 124,000 acres of the park will continue to be a place where nature and its “community of life are untrammeled by man, a place where man himself is a visitor who does not remain.” Contact Information Traveling into the Zion Wilderness, even on short trips, can be very challenging and requires careful planning before you begin. Your safety depends on your own good judgment, adequate preparation, and constant observation. Zion Wilderness “A wilderness, in contrast with those areas where man and his own works dominate the landscape, is hereby recognized as an area where the earth and its community of life are untrammeled by man, where man himself is a visitor who does not remain.” - 1964 Wilderness Act NPS Image/Rendall Seely On March 30, 2009, President Barack Obama signed the Omnibus Public Land Management Act of 2009 into law designating 124,406 acres of Wilderness in Zion National Park. Eighty-four percent of the acreage of Zion National Park is managed under the 1964 Wilderness Act. In addition to this designation, 153 miles of rivers and streams within Zion National Park are designated as Wild and Scenic and are managed under the requirements of the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act of 1968. Zion Park Information 435 772-3256 E-mail zion_park_information@nps.gov Wilderness Information 435 772-0170 Lost and Found Report at any visitor center Website www.nps.gov/zion Park Emergencies 911 or 435 772-3322 WILDERNESS PERMITS PERMIT FEES HOW TO OBTAIN A WILDERNESS PERMIT GUIDED ACTIVITIES Wilderness Permits are required for all overnight backpacking trips, overnight climbing bivouacs, all through-hikes of The Narrows and its tributaries, all canyons requiring the use of descending gear or ropes, and all trips into Left Fork of North Creek (The Subway). Advanced reservations, lottery applications, and walk-in permits are available for various areas within the Zion Wilderness. Please visit the Zion National Park webpage: www.nps.gov/zion for current reservation, lottery application, and Wilderness Permit information. Fees help cover the costs of issuing permits, patrolling wilderness areas, monitoring park resources, and repairing trails. Please visit the Zion National Park webpage: www.nps.gov/zion for current reservation, lottery application, and/or Wilderness permit fees. Structured and/or formally guided activities facilitated by educational, commercial, or like organizations are authorized to occur only on front country trails. Such activities are not authorized to take place in park Wilderness areas. (Primitive and Pristine Zones). Published 2020 Canyoneering Canyoneering combines route finding, rappelling, problem solving, hiking, and swimming. Zion National Park is one of the premier places in the country to participate in this exciting activity. With dozens of different canyons to explore, some barely wide enough for a human to squeeze through, the park offers opportunities that range from trips for beginners to experiences requiring advanced technical skills. You can help preserve and protect the canyons of Zion for future generations by following these park regulations and Leave No Trace principles. WILDERNESS PERMITS Permits are required for all technical canyoneering trips and all trips into the Left Fork of North Creek (The Subway). Permits must be carried with you and shown upon request. PLAN AHEAD AND PREPARE Ensure that your group is self-reliant and aware of the risks involved with canyoneering. Know the current Flash Flood Potential rating. Flash floods in narrow slot canyons can be fatal. If bad weather threatens, do not enter a narrow canyon. Continuously evaluate the weather and adjust plans to keep you and your group safe. Always have a back-up plan. Rescue is not a certainty. Your safety is your responsibility. EXPERIENCE AND ABILITY Everyone in the group should have the proper equipment, skill level, and ability to belay, ascend, create extra friction, and evaluate anchors. Everyone should be prepared to spend additional time, travel after dark, spend the night if necessary, and survive on their own. The group should have a route description, map, compass, and the ability to use them to locate the correct route for your trip. TRAVEL
Southwest Desert Campsites National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Zion National Park April 2009 it h Campsites are assigned when obtaining a backcountry permit. See back for campsite descriptions. Co a lp a sW s Site # Max # 1. . . . . . .6 2. . . . . . .6 3. . . . . . .6 4. . . . . . .6 5. . . . . . .6 6. . . . . .12 5 Coalpits Spring 4 2 lpi ts W a sh Spring Intermittent Stream 1 Chinle Trail Co a 3 State Route 9 Park Boundary Scoggins Wash Stock Trail h Virgin River ns W as Zion National its Wa s h 6 Sc gi og Co a lp Park H e ub r Wash C h in l e Tra il To Virgin To Springdale & park entrance See trailhead description on back Rockville Vir gin R 0 0.5 1 2 Miles ive r The National Park Service does not assume responsibility for information accuracy, precision, or completeness of data as displayed on this map. QTrailhead & Campsite DescriptionsÆ Æ Q Chinle Trailhead Location The trailhead is located of Anasazi Way on a plateau above Springdale and Rockville. Drive west from the park on State Route 9 through Springdale. Turn right onto Anasazi Way, which heads uphill on steep switchbacks. Approximately 500 feet up the road is the first side road on your right. Follow this short road to the parking area and the trailhead. Land between the trailhead parking and park boundary is private; please stay on the designated trail. 1. Temple View Campsite Temple View is just off the Chinle Trail to the south on a small ridge. As the name implies, it has great views of the West Temple and also of Kinesava and Scoggins wash. 2. Scoggins Wash Campsite A short walk off the Chinle trail down a wash to the south will lead you to this site. This site has a great slickrock area that overlooks Scoggins Wash. 3. Yucca Campsite Yucca is located on a nice sandy area just south of the Chinle trail. It sits slightly up on a knoll and is surrounded by desert vegetation. 4. Coal Pits Ridge Campsite This site is located on a ridge just above Coal Pits Wash on the Chinle Trail. It sits among several boulders and has great views, and is only a short walk to Coal Pits Wash where water is available. 5. Coal Pit Wash Campsite This site is located at the junction of Dalton Wash and Coal Pits Wash. It is located on a sandy area surrounded by dark lava rock to the north of the wash. This site is a good location for further explorations, with the junction of the Chinle trail nearby. Water can also be found here. 6. Junction Campsite This site is located at the junction of Scoggins and Coal Pits Wash. It is located on a sandy bench to the west of the drainage with great views of the surrounding mesas. Coalpits Spring Located in an area downstream of the Chinle Trail junction, this spring is on the canyon wall to the west under an overhang. It can become dry in some years so check with Backcountry when making plans. Location: N 37°12'54.0", W 113°04'44.5" Map Datum: WGS 84
Narrows Campsites National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Zion National Park Chamberlain's Ranch Ko p Cr e ek r North F ork Virgin R ive ee lo D k re e bC Go os 1 2 3 4-5 6 e ee Cr k 10 First Narrows 8 Narrow passage around waterfall on south side of river. 7 9 Zion 11 12 Big Springs Site # Max # 1. . . . . . .4 2. . . . . . .4 3. . . . . . .6 4. . . . . . .2 5. . . . . . .6 6. . . . . . 12 . 7. . . . . . 6 8. . . . . . .6 9. . . . . . .6 10. . . . . .6 11. . . . . .4 12. . . . .12 tion Sec s g Lon arrow of N Safe No round hG Hig National Campsites are assigned when obtaining a wilderness permit. See back for campsite descriptions. HIKING TIMETABLE Hours Chamberlain's Ranch. . . . . . . . . . . . 0:00 Bulloch's Cabin. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:00 First Narrows. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:30 Waterfall. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:15 Deep Creek. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:00 Kolob Creek. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:45 Goose Creek. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:35 Big Springs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:20 Orderville Canyon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:00 North End of Riverside Walk. . . . . . 11:50 Temple of Sinawava. . . . . . . . . . . . 12:20 This timetable is approximate. The trip may be done in less time, but allowances have been made for rest stops, picture taking, and slow hikers. Park Track your progress by recognizing side canyons and landmarks. Deep Creek, Kolob Creek, and Big Springs are all fairly obvious, but watch closely for the mouth of Goose Creek--it can be easy to miss. on Or derville C a ny No rth Fo rk Vir gin River Bulloch's Cabin North End of Riverside Walk Hiking the Zion Narrows has inherent risks and you assume complete responsibility for the safety of all members of your group. The National Park Service does not assume responsibility for information accuracy, precision, or completeness of data as displayed on this map. Temple of Sinawava Boundary Streams 0 0.5 1 Scenic Drive 2 Miles Flash Floods The Narrows are potentially hazardous. Know the weather and flash flood potential forecasts before starting your trip. If bad weather threatens, do not enter a narrow canyon. Your decisions and actions regarding your safety are your responsibility. Watch for these indications of a possible flash flood: • Any deterioration in weather conditions • Build up of clouds or sounds of thunder • Sudden changes in water clarity from clear to muddy • Floating debris • Rising water levels or stronger currents • Increasing roar of water up canyon If you observe any of these signs, seek higher ground immediately. Even climbing a few feet may save your life. Remain on high ground until conditions improve. Water levels usually drop within 24 hours. Flash floods do occur in the park during periods of low flash flood potential. A moderate or higher flash flood potential should be a serious cause for concern. Campsite Descriptions 1. Deep Creek At the confluence of Deep Creek. The site is located on the left side of the river. 7. Box Elder A 10 minute walk beyond Kolob Creek. This site is located on the left about 30 feet up on a bench. 2. River Bend A 10-15 minute walk beyond Deep Creek, River Bend is located on the right side of the point of a sharp bench 10 feet above the river. 8. Boulder Camp Across the river from Box Elder, 10 minunte walk beyond Kolob Creek around a sharp bend. The access trail is to the right up slope about 50 feet. 3. Right Bench A 10-15 minute walk from River Bend, this is located on the right hand bench in a stand of maples 20 feet above the river. 9. Left Bench A 10 minute walk beyond Boulder Camp, on the left. Located on a 10-foot bench next to the canyon wall. In a grove of maples. It can be easy to miss. 4. Flat Rock Flat Rock is a 5-10 minute walk beyond Right Bench, located beside a large flat rock next to the river. The site is next to the rock, on a 6 ft high bench next to the canyon wall. 10. West Bend A 5 minute hike from Left Bench. This site is on a high bank located on a western bend. 5.Ringtail A short 5 minute walk beyond Flat Rock, Ringtail is located on a right bench in a sandy area. Just before Kolob Creek. 6.Kolob Creek At the confluence of Kolob Creek. The site is located on the right side, 20 feet above the river on a bench. 11. Spotted Owl This sunny site is located on the left side, immediately after the first stream crossing. It is up a slope 10 feet above the river. 12. High Camp High Camp is a 15-20 minute walk beyond Spotted Owl on a slow, difficult section of the river, 300 yards before Big Spring. The Site is on the left side of the river on a 25 foot high bench in a stand of maple and douglas fir. It can be easy to miss. Big Spring This large water source is located on the right side of the river, below all campsites. There is no high ground down stream, between Big Spring and Orderville. There is little h
National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Zion National Park Springdale, Utah 84767 435 772-3256 phone 435 772-3426 fax www.nps.gov/zion Zion National Park Pine Creek Canyon Several access trails have been created by park visitors to enter the upper section of Pine Creek Canyon. Over time those trails have become extremely eroded. In efforts to reduce the erosion in this area, volunteers have worked to identify a single access point into Pine Creek. This trail is made up of a more durable surface and will have less noticeable impact from the numbers of people traveling in the area. Please help minimize erosion and use this route. Pine Creek Canyon Access Point From the parking lot at the tunnel, walk toward the bridges/road. You will see an access trail that will descend into the canyon. Please stay on hardened surfaces! Pine Creek Access Trail EXPERIENCE YOUR AMERICA The National Park Service cares for special places saved by the American people so that all may experience our heritage.
National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Zion National Park Springdale, Utah 84767 435 772-3256 phone 435 772-3426 fax www.nps.gov/zion Zion National Park Spry Canyon When exiting Spry Canyon do not traverse to the landslide and descend! This causes excessive erosion. Several efforts have been made by the National Park Service and the canyoneering community to repair this eroded slope. However, even the smallest amount of use causes a huge impact on this delicate slope. To prevent further damage, stay in the rocky boulder field directly below the last rappel. As you scramble through the watercourse (boulder field) you will come to a ledge with a 100 foot drop. Rappel or follow the rocky area until you reach Pine Creek. You can then follow Pine Creek drainage all the way to the bridge and parking area. No! Yes! EXPERIENCE YOUR AMERICA The National Park Service cares for special places saved by the American people so that all may experience our heritage.
National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Zion National Park Springdale, UT 84767 435 772-3256 phone 435 772-3426 fax www.nps.gov/zion Keyhole Canyon Access trails into Keyhole Canyon have become extremely eroded. During the fall of 2005, the National Park Service worked with the Zion Canyoneering Coalition to move the Keyhole access trail to erosion resistant slick rock. Historically, there have been two access routes into Keyhole Canyon. The middle access traverses a saddle and drops into the canyon. Once in the bottom of the canyon, canyoneers immediately rappel off a large ponderosa pine. Because of severe erosion, do not use the middle access route. The upper access traverses a slickrock saddle and enters Keyhole Canyon a short distance upstream from the middle access point. Ten minutes and 100 yards of non-technical canyoneering downstream is the first rappel off of the ponderosa pine. Prevent erosion! Use the upper access route, and stay on the slick rock. EXPERIENCE YOUR AMERICA The National Park Service cares for special places saved by the American people so that they may experience our heritage.
W W Herons, Ibises, & Storks o American bittern o great blue heron o great egret o snowy egret o cattle egret o green heron o black-crowned night heron o white-faced ibis o wood stork x u r u r r r u - r r x x u x r r r r r - u r - W W W W W W W W W Vultures o turkey vulture* o California condor* u r c u u u x r A EP Swans, Geese, & Ducks o tundra swan o snow goose o Canada goose o wood duck o green-winged teal* o mallard* r r u u c r c r r u c c x u u u c W W W W W W 1 r r u u c r r x c r u u c r u r x u u u c r x c r u u c r u r W W D EPR EPR E R R R DE R A DP D DEP DER PR A DE Pheasants, Grouse, Turkey, & Quail o ring-necked pheasant* r o dusky grouse* u o wild turkey* c o Gambel’s quail* u r u c u r u c u r u c u D E ER DR Rails & Cranes o Virginia rail* o sora* o American coot* o sandhill crane r r u 2 r r r - r r u - r r c x W W W W r u x x x u - W W W DW D W u r r u u x r x u u x x u u r r x u x - x x r x u u u x x x u r r - r u - W W W W W W W W W W W W W W RW W W W Gulls & Terns o Franklin’s gull o Bonaparte’s gull o ring-billed gull o California gull o herring gull o Caspian tern o Forster’s tern o black tern r x u u x x r - x x x r r x x x - r x - W W W W W W W W Pigeons & Doves o rock pigeon o band-tailed pigeon* o white-winged dove o mourning dove* o inca dove o Eurasian collared-dove r x x c x c r u c x c r x r x c r DR E R r A x R c DRW Cuckoos & Roadrunners o yellow-billed cuckoo o greater roadrunner u r u r u u 3 R D Owls o barn owl o fammulated owl* o western screech-owl* o great horned owl* o northern pygmy-owl* o Mexican spotted owl* o long-eared owl o short-eared owl o northern saw-whet owl r r u u u u x s r r u u u u x s r r u u u u s r PR - EP u ER u A u EPR u E - DP P s ER Goatsuckers o lesser nighthawk o common nighthawk o common poorwill* o Mexican whip-poor-will u u r r u u - u u - - D A DEP R Swifts o black swift o Vaux’s swift o white-throated swift* r x c c r x c r R R A Hummingbirds o broad-billed hummingbird o blue-throated hummingbird o magnifcent hummingbird o black-chinned hummingbird* o Costa’s hummingbird* o Anna’s hummingbird o calliope hummingbird o broad-tailed hummingbird* o rufous hummingbird x c u x r u - x x c r x u r x c r u u - R R R A D DR ER E ER Kingfshers o belted kingfsher* u u u u RW Woodpeckers o Lewis’ woodpecker o acorn woodpecker o red-naped sapsucker* o Williamson’s sapsucker o ladder-backed woodpecker o downy woodpecker o hairy woodpecker* o three-toed woodpecker o northern ficker* x x c r u c u r u r u c u r c r r u c u r s r r u c x c E E EPR EP DR EPR EPR P EPR Flycatchers o olive-sided fycatcher* o western wood-pewee* o willow fycatcher* o Hammond’s fycatcher o dusky fycatcher* u u r r u u c r u u u r u - E ER R ER EPR 4 Habitat r r u c r r x r x c r u c u r x u - Winter - r r u u c r r x r c r u u c u r r u x u Fall r - Osprey, Eagles, Hawks, & Falcons o osprey o bald eagle o northern harrier o sharp-shinned hawk* o cooper’s hawk* o northern goshawk* o common black-hawk o red-shouldered hawk o broad-winged hawk o Swainson’s hawk o zone-tailed hawk o red-tailed hawk* o ferruginous hawk o rough-legged hawk o golden eagle* o American kestrel* o merlin o peregrine falcon* o prairie falcon Shorebirds o black-bellied plover o snowy plover o semipalmated plover o killdeer* o mountain plover o black-necked stilt o American avocet o greater yellowlegs o lesser yellowlegs o solitary sandpiper o willet o wandering tattler o spotted sandpiper* o long-billed curlew o marbled godwit o sanderling o western sandpiper o least sandpiper o Baird’s sandpiper o pectoral sandpiper o long-billed dowitcher o common snipe o Wilson’s phalarope o red-necked phalarope o red phalarope Summer x W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W Spring x r u r u u u u u r u u x x u u r r u Habitat Pelicans & Cormorants o American white pelican o double-crested cormorant u r c u u u u u c u x u u u u u Winter W W W W W W r u r r - Fall u r u - u u c u u u u u c u u u u u u Summer Habitat r u r c r - o northern pintail* o blue-winged teal o cinnamon teal o northern shoveler o gadwall o American wigeon o canvasback o redhead o ring-necked duck o lesser scaup o long-tailed duck o surf scoter o white-winged scoter o common goldeneye o bufehead o common merganser* o red-breasted merganser o ruddy duck Spring Winter r - Habitat Fall r u x c r x Winter Summer Loons & Grebes o common loon o pied-billed grebe o horned grebe o eared grebe o western grebe o Clark’s grebe Fall Spring This checklist contains 290 bird species. Summer Abundance c Common: seen most days in correct season and habitat. u Uncommon: seen in low numbers in correct season and habitat. r Rare: no more than a few sightings per year. s Sporadic: may be numerous some years and absent in others. x Accidental: reported but not well documented. Species not known to occur in this season or no av
National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Zion Zion National Park Mammals Encountering Wildlife Key to this guide Bats (Chiroptera) What wildlife will you see today? Watching animals in their natural environment is one reason we come to national parks. Free-roaming animals contribute to the wildness and uniqueness of Zion National Park. But, we must remember that this is their one and only home. Please treat them with the respect they deserve. Enjoy them from a distance. Animals will protect themselves, their territory, and their young if you get too close. Deer may kick suddenly and cause serious injuries. Turkeys can run at people and hop on cars. Even though it may seem harmless, feeding wild animals causes many problems. Squirrels will bite and carry diseases. Human food often makes animals sick and can even kill them. Most sadly, animals that are fed become less wild, and then something significant has been lost, possibly forever. Abundant: May be seen daily, in suitable habitat and season, and in relatively large numbers. Common: May be seen daily, in suitable habitat and season, but not in large numbers. Uncommon: Likely to be seen monthly in appropriate season and habitat. May be common locally. Rare: Present but seldom observed, usually only seen a few times each year. Unconfirmed: Reports of these species in the park are unconfirmed. Please report sightings with location/date/time, to the visitor center. Photos and GPS coordinates (with datum) are preferred. California Myotis - Myotis californicus: Uncommon, lower elevations. Western Small-footed Myotis - Myotis ciliolabrum: Uncommon, higher elevations. Long-eared Myotis - Myotis evotis: Uncommon, parkwide. Fringed Myotis - Myotis thysanodes: Uncommon, parkwide. Long-legged Myotis - Myotis volans: Uncommon, parkwide. Yuma Myotis - Myotis yumanensis: Uncommon, parkwide, near water. Western Red Bat - Lasiurus blossevillii: Uncommon, migrant, wooded areas. Hoary Bat - Lasiurus cinereus: Uncommon, migrant, wooded areas. Silver-haired Bat - Lasionycteris noctivagans: Uncommon, higher elevations. Western Pipistrelle - Pipistrellus hesperus: Uncommon, lower elevations. Big Brown Bat - Eptesicus fuscus: Uncommon, lower elevations. Spotted Bat - Euderma maculatum: Uncommon, parkwide. Townsend’s Big-eared Bat - Corynorhinus townsendii: Uncommon, in canyons. Allen’s Big-eared Bat - Idionycteris phyllotis: Uncommon, likely to occur in forested areas. Pallid Bat - Antrozous pallidus: Uncommon, in canyons, lower elevations. Brazilian Free-tailed Bat - Tadarida brasiliensis: Uncommon, canyons to low desert. Big Free-tailed Bat - Nyctinomops macrotis: Uncommon, canyons. Viewing wildlife is often best in the morning and evening hours. In Zion’s hot, desert climate many animals are nocturnal or avoid the heat of the day. Slow down, be patient and don’t forget to listen — enjoy your wildlife encounters! Western Red Bat Pika, Rabbits, and Hares (Lagomorpha) American Pika - Ochotona princeps: Rare, high elevation talus. Desert Cottontail - Sylvilagus audubonii: Common, below 5,000 ft elevation. Mountain Cottontail - Sylvilagus nuttallii: Uncommon, above 5,000 ft elevation. Black-tailed Jackrabbit - Lepus californicus: Uncommon, parkwide. Black-tailed Jackrabbit Rodents (Rodentia) Cliff Chipmunk - Neotamias dorsalis: Uncommon, middle elevations, near cliffs. Least Chipmunk - Neotamias minimus: Uncommon, on plateau in shrubby areas. Uinta Chipmunk - Neotamias umbrinus: Uncommon, on plateau in pine-fir zone. Yellow-bellied Marmot - Marmota flaviventris: Uncommon, middle and upper elevations. White-tailed Antelope Squirrel - Ammospermophilus leucurus: Uncommon, lower elevations. Golden-mantled Ground Squirrel Spermophilus lateralis: Uncommon, higher elevations. Rock Squirrel - Spermophilus variegatus: Common, rocky areas, parkwide. Red Squirrel - Tamiasciurus hudsonicus: Uncommon, on plateau in pine-fir zone. Northern Flying Squirrel - Glaucomys sabrinus: Uncommon, higher elevations. Botta’s Pocket Gopher - Thomomys bottae: Uncommon, canyons and lower elevations. Northern Pocket Gopher - Thomomys talpoides: Uncommon, upper elevations. Great Basin Pocket Mouse - Perognathus parvus: Uncommon, middle and upper elevations. Little Pocket Mouse - Perognathus longimembris: Unconfirmed, mid to high elevations. Report sightings; photos helpful. Long-tailed Pocket Mouse - Chaetodipus formosus: Uncommon, lower elevations. Merriam’s Kangaroo Rat - Dipodomys merriami: Uncommon, sandy areas, lower elevations. Chisel-toothed Kangaroo Rat - Dipodomys microps: Unconfirmed, sandy areas, lower elevations. Report sightings; photos helpful. Ord’s Kangaroo Rat - Dipodomys ordii: Uncommon, sandy areas, middle elevations. American Beaver - Castor canadensis: Uncommon, along water courses. Report sightings; photos helpful. Western Harvest Mouse - Reithrodontomys megalotis: Uncommon, parkwide. Brush Mouse - Peromyscus boylii: Uncommon, low and middle elevations. Canyon Mouse
National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Zion National Park Common Plants The following abbreviations are used to describe where and when certain plants may be found in Zion National Park. Heath Family (Ericaceae) Manzanita - Arctostaphylos species (2) PST/W-Sp Location C = Canyons D = Desert, lower washes, and sandy areas H = Hanging gardens and seeps P = Plateau R = Riparian S = Slickrock and cliffs T = Talus slopes Honeysuckle Family (Caprifioliaceae) Snowberry - Symphoricarpos species (5) CP/Sp-Su Joint-fir Family (Ephedraceae) Ephedra/Mormon tea - Ephedra species (3) CDT/Sp Mint Family (Lamiaceae) Dorr’s sage - Salvia dorrii CDT/Sp Oleaster Family (Elaeagnaceae) Russian olive* - Elaeagnus angustifolia Roundleaf buffaloberry - Shepherdia rotundifolia CR/Sp DT/W-Sp Pea Family (Fabaceae) Indigobush/Desert beauty - Dalea fremontii DT/Sp Potato Family (Solanaceae) Wolfberry - Lycium pallidum CD/Sp Rose Family (Rosaceae) Saskatoon serviceberry - Amelanchier alnifolia Utah serviceberry - Amelanchier utahensis Mountain mahogany - Cercocarpus species (3) Blackbrush - Coleogyne ramosissimum Western chokecherry - Prunus virginiana Cliffrose - Purshia stansburyana Antelope bitterbrush - Purshia tridentata Wood’s rose - Rosa woodsii CP/Sp CPT/Sp S/Sp CD/Sp P/Sp CDST/Sp CPT/Sp CPR/Su Silk-Tassel Family (Garryaceae) Ashy silk-tassel - Garrya flavescens C/W Blooming Season Sp = Spring Su = Summer F = Fall W = Winter N = No flower An asterisk * denotes introduced (non-native) species. A circle ° denotes endemic species - those found only in this region. Trees Birch Family (Betulaceae) Water birch - Betula occidentalis Hemp Family (Cannabaceae) Netleaf hackberry - Celtis reticulata Juniper or Cypress Family (Cupressaceae) Utah juniper - Juniperus osteosperma Rocky Mountain juniper - Juniperus scopulorum CR/Sp CT/Sp DPST/N PRT/N Maple Family (Aceraceae) Bigtooth maple - Acer grandidentatum CPS/Sp Boxelder - Acer negundo CRS/Sp Crimson Monkeyflower (Erythranthe verbenacea) Zion National Park is located at the convergence of three distinct ecological regions: the Colorado Plateau, the Mojave Desert, and the Great Basin. This unique location, along with Zion’s dramatic landscape and the prevalence of water, creates ideal habitat for a wide variety of plants. In all, Zion is home to over 1,000 species of plants. This list provides a glimpse of the incredible biodiversity that can be found within the park. Updated 7/2021 Oak Family (Fagaceae) Gambel oak - Quercus gambelii Sonoran scrub oak - Quercus turbinella Wavyleaf oak - Quercus x undulata CPST/Sp CDST/Sp CP/Sp Olive Family (Oleaceae) Singleleaf ash - Fraxinus anomala Velvet ash - Fraxinus velutina CST/Sp CR/Sp Pea Family (Fabaceae) New Mexico locust - Robinia neomexicana Black locust* - Robinia pseudoacacia C/Sp C/Sp Pine Family (Pinaceae) White fir - Abies concolor CP/N Piñon pine - Pinus edulis CPST/N Singleleaf piñon - Pinus monophylla CPST/N Ponderosa pine - Pinus ponderosa SP/N Douglas fir - Pseudotsuga menziesii CSP/N Rose Family (Rosaceae) Apple tree* - Malus domestica C/Sp Tamarix Family (Tamaricaceae) Tamarisk/Saltcedar* - Tamarix ramosissima CR/Sp-F Willow Family (Salicaceae) Fremont cottonwood - Populus fremontii Quaking aspen - Populus tremuloides Willow - Salix species (9) CRS/Sp PS/Sp CR/Sp Zion Shootingstar (Primula pauciflora var. zionensis) Shrubs Agave Family (Asparagaceae) Narrow-leaved yucca - Yucca angustissima Datil yucca - Yucca baccata Utah yucca - Yucca utahensis CDPST/Sp CDT/Sp CDPST/Sp Borage Family (Boraginaceae) Narrowleaf yerba-santa - Eriodictyon angustifolium CDS/Su Barberry Family (Berberidaceae) Creeping mahonia - Berberis repens Fremont barberry - Berberis fremontii CP/Sp CDS/Sp Cashew/Sumac Family (Anacardiaceae) Smooth sumac - Rhus glabra Western poison ivy -Toxicodendron rydbergii Skunkbush sumac - Rhus trilobata Fragrant sumac - Rhus aromatica CDT/Sp CHR/Sp-Su CDT/Sp CDT/Sp Composite Family (Asteraceae) Big sagebrush - Artemisia tridentata Old man sagebrush - Artemisia filifolia Waterwillow - Baccharis emoryi Rabbitbrush/goldenbush - Ericameria species (4) Broom snakeweed - Gutierrezia sarothrae Bush encelia - Encelia frutescens virginensis CDP/F CDT/Sp, F CR/F CD/F CDT/F DT/Su Dogwood Family (Cornaceae) Red-osier dogwood - Cornus stolonifera P/Sp Cacti Elder Family (Viburnaceae) Red elderberry - Sambucus racemosa Blue elderberry - Sambucus caerulea P/Su CRP/Su Goosefoot Family (Chenopodiaceae) Four-wing saltbush - Atriplex canescens Shadscale - Atriplex confertifolia CD/Su DT/Sp Grape Family (Vitaceae) Canyon wild grape - Vitis arizonica CR/Sp Cactus Family (Cactaceae) Hedgehog cactus - Echinocereus species (3) Pricklypear cactus - Opuntia species (7) Beavertail cactus - Opuntia basilaris Cholla - Cylindropuntia species (3) Whipple’s C
National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Zion Zion National Park Reptiles and Amphibians Terrestrial Gartersnake and Canyon Treefrog Key to this guide Measurements: Measurements are from snout to vent for amphibians and lizards (tail length not included). † Threatened or endangered species. Western Chuckwalla Amphibians Tiger Salamander - Ambystoma tigrinum: 3-6.5” large stocky salamander. Yellow to dark olive spots/ blotches with irregular edges on dark ground color. Great Basin Spadefoot - Spea intermontanus: 1.5-2.5” hourglass marking of gray or olive on back set off by ash-gray streaks. Pupils are vertical. Spade on hind foot wedge-shaped. Arizona Toad - Bufo microscaphus: 2-3.25” green-gray, brown colored with light V-shaped stripe across head. Warts red to brown (also called Southwestern Toad). Red-spotted Toad - Bufo punctatus: 1.5-3” small toad with flattened head and pointed snout; Light gray to reddish brown with red/orange warts. Woodhouse’s Toad - Bufo woodhousii: 1.25-5” gray, brown, or olive above with whitish dorsal stripe down middle of back; warts light. Unconfirmed native - Please report sightings; photos helpful. Canyon Treefrog - Hyla arenicolor: 1.25-2.25”; brown, gray, or olive frog, normally without eyestripe; very faint pattern of dark patches on back. Suction discs on toes. Northern Leopard Frog - Rana pipiens: 2-4.4”; greenish/brown frog with well defined rounded pale bordered, dark spots; white stripe on upper jaw. Canyon Treefrog Lizards Collared Lizard Snakes Great Basin Gopher Snake Tortoise Western Banded Gecko - Coleonyx variegatus: 2-3”; fragile appearance, large eyes with vertical pupils, cream colored with dark crossbands. Common Chuckwalla - Sauromalus ater: 5.5-8”; large, flat, dark bodied. Loose folds of skin on neck and sides; may have dark or light cross bands on body; blunt tail with broad base. Great Basin Collared Lizard - Crotaphytus bicinctores: 3-4.25”; tail up to twice the length of the body; two black bands on shoulder and neck; overall color is olive-brown to green. Long-nosed Leopard Lizard - Gambelia wislizenii: 3.25-5.75”; gray-brown color with dusky brown spots; whitish lines across back and tail. Gravid (pregnant) females have bright orange spots. Zebra-tailed Lizard - Callisaurus draconoides: 2.5-4”; ear openings present. Underside of tail with black bars. Belly markings at midpoint of body. Desert Spiny Lizard - Sceloporus magister: 3.255.5”; stout, strong looking lizard; gray to brown mottled with yellow, green, brown, and metallic blue; black shoulder markings. Plateau Lizard - Sceloporus tristichus: 1.6-3.25”; Plain gray to brown with yellow to green blotches; may be some blue on throat. One of the most frequently seen lizards in Zion. (Note: taxonomy is unstable; sometimes listed as a subspecies of Sceloporus elongatus.) Common Sagebrush Lizard - Sceloporus graciosus: 1.8-2.6”; very similar to plateau lizard but slightly smaller and darker. Side-blotched Lizard - Uta stansburiana: 1.5-2.3”; overall gray to brown color with black “armpit.” In spring, males with variable flecking on sides and back. Ornate Tree Lizard - Urosaurus ornatus: 1.52.25”; gray to brown overall with strip of enlarged scales down center of back. Desert Horned Lizard - Phrynosoma platyrhinos: 2.5-3.75”; similar to short-horned but has long head spines and is found at low elevations. Greater Short-horned Lizard - Phrynosoma hernandesi: 1.75-4.25”; broad, flat body; short tail; short horns or spine on back of head; irregular dark and light markings; high elevation. Western Skink - Eumeces skiltonianus: 2.1-3.75”; body long and rounded; shiny appearance; body cream to light brown with dark stripe down each side and lighter stripe down back; tail bright blue in young, fading with age. Plateau Spotted Whiptail - Cnemidophorus innotatus: 2.5-3.5”; slender body; tail about twice the length of the body; well defined dark and light stripes down back. Western Whiptail - Cnemidophorus tigris: 2.254.5”; very long and streamlined; generally gray to brown with mottled black or brown blotches on back and sides; adults with orange tent on lower back and base of tail; tail about twice the length of the body. Gila Monster - Heloderma suspectum: 9-14”; swollen, dorsal bead-like tail. Gaudy pattern of pink, black, orange, and yellow. Ring-necked Snake - Diadophis punctatus: 8-30”; olive above; yellow-orange below; no ring around neck. Coachwhip - Masticophis flagellum: 36-72”; slender; pinkish (may be tan/light brown) with faint crossbands down back, those on neck much darker. Striped Whipsnake - Masticophis taeniatus: 36-72”; slender; black to brown back with four narrow stripes running length of body. Western Patch-nosed Snake - Salvadora hexalepis: 20-46”; light tan/ground colored with wide brown-black stripe running length of each side. Gophersnake - Pituophis catenifer: 36-72”; yellow-gray to red-brown; dark brown-black blotches down back; dark line from eye to eye. Co

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