Whiskeytown

National Recreation Area - California

The Whiskeytown–Shasta–Trinity National Recreation Area is a United States National Recreation Area in northern California.

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Official Visitor Map of Whiskeytown National Recreation Area (NRA) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Whiskeytown - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Whiskeytown National Recreation Area (NRA) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Recreation Map of Swasey Mule Mountain Recreation Area (RA) in the BLM Redding Field Office area. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Swasey Mule Mountain - Recreation Map

Recreation Map of Swasey Mule Mountain Recreation Area (RA) in the BLM Redding Field Office area. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Map of the Nobles Emigrant Trail section, part of the California National Historic Trail (NHT), located outside of Susanville, California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Nobles Emigrant Trail - Trail Map

Map of the Nobles Emigrant Trail section, part of the California National Historic Trail (NHT), located outside of Susanville, California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Vintage 1958 USGS 1:250000 Map of Redding in California. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).Vintage USGS - Redding - 1958

Vintage 1958 USGS 1:250000 Map of Redding in California. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

https://www.nps.gov/whis/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whiskeytown%E2%80%93Shasta%E2%80%93Trinity_National_Recreation_Area The Whiskeytown–Shasta–Trinity National Recreation Area is a United States National Recreation Area in northern California. Whiskeytown Lake’s crystal-clear water is perhaps the most recognized feature of the park. However, water-based recreation is only a part of what the 42,000-acre Whiskeytown National Recreation Area has to offer. Visit waterfalls, hike through rugged mountains, explore California Gold Rush history, and observe post-fire ecology in action. Your national park is calling... Car From Interstate 5, take the Highway 44 West exit toward Downtown Redding and Eureka. From Downtown Redding, follow Highway 299 west toward Eureka for approximately 8 miles to reach the Visitor Center. Plane Commercial air service is available to Redding California located approximately 16 miles from Whiskeytown. Rental vehicles are available. Where's the Whiskey Wayside Where's the Whiskey? Where's the Town? Wayside. Whiskeytown Visitor Center The Visitor Center is a great place to start when you arrive in the park. Knowledgeable staff can help you maximize your visit. The Visitor Center is located at the intersection of Kennedy Memorial Drive and Highway 299. You can purchase a variety of Interagency and park-specific entrance passes as well as books, maps, and souvenir items. Exhibits outside the building introduce you to the natural and cultural history of the park. A small native plant garden is located behind the Visitor Center. Car From Interstate 5, take the Highway 44 West exit toward Downtown Redding and Eureka. From Downtown Redding, follow Highway 299 west toward Eureka for approximately 8 miles to reach the Visitor Center. Plane Commercial air service is available to Redding California located approximately 16 miles from Whiskeytown. Rental vehicles are available. Brandy Creek This two site campground is found just off Brandy Creek Road, with Brandy Creek accessible a short walk away. The Brandy Creek trail, popular with hikers, mountain bikers, and horseback riders, runs next to the campground. This campsite is closed during the winter. Both sites are in partial shade and feature a bear-proof storage locker, picnic table, lamp pole, fire pit with swing-arm BBQ grill, and an ADA accessible vault toilet. Each site has a maximum occupancy of six people and two vehicles. Brandy Creek campground fee 20.00 This is the nightly cost for a tent-only site. Maximum occupancy: 6 people and two vehicles. Pay for your site online at Recreation.gov or call toll free 1-877-444-6777. This is the only way to pay for or reserve a site at the campground. We no longer accept payment at the Whiskeytown visitor center. Brandy Creek Site 1 Brandy Creek Site 1 Brandy Creek Site 1 Brandy Creek Site 1 #2 Brandy Creek Site 1 #2 Brandy Creek Site 1 #2 Brandy Creek Site 2 Brandy Creek Site 2 Brandy Creek Site 2 Brandy Creek Site 2 #2 Brandy Creek Site 2 #2 Brandy Creek Site 2 #2 Brandy Creek RV A secluded hilltop RV site close to Brandy Creek Marina and within walking distance of Brandy Creek Beach, the Brandy Creek trail and the Davis Gulch trail. Campground is an asphalt parking lot with 15 parking sites. Only for self-contained units that have their own toilets, such as recreational vehicles, cab-over campers, pop-up tent trailers, and fifth wheels. There is no bathroom and no hookups at this campground. One main water and dump station shared by all campers. RV camping fee 20.00 Water, dump station may be shut off periodically during the winter to prevent freezing. Pay for your site online at Recreation.gov or call toll free 1-877-444-6777. This is the only way to pay for or reserve a site at the campground. We no longer accept payment at the Whiskeytown visitor center. Brandy Creek RV Campground Brandy Creek RV Campground Brandy Creek RV Campground Brandy Creek RV Campground RV Spaces Brandy Creek RV Campground RV Spaces Brandy Creek RV Campground RV Spaces Brandy Creek RV Campground Fill Station Brandy Creek RV Campground Fill Station Brandy Creek RV Campground Fill Station Brandy Creek RV Campground RV Space Brandy Creek RV Campground RV Space Brandy Creek RV Campground RV Space Crystal Creek The Crystal Creek campground offers two secluded sites along Crystal Creek and is a short drive away from both Crystal Creek falls and the James K. Carr trail to Whiskeytown Falls. This campsite is closed during the winter. A fairly steep dirt road accesses the campsites. Both sites are well shaded and feature a bear-proof storage locker, picnic table, lamp pole, fire pit with swing-arm BBQ grill, with a shared ADA accessible vault toilet. Each site has a maximum occupancy of six people and two vehicles. Crystal Creek camping fee 20.00 This is the nightly cost for a tent-only site. Maximum occupancy: 6 people and two vehicles. Pay for your site online at Recreation.gov or call toll free 1-877-444-6777. This is the only way to pay for or reserve a site at the campground. We no longer accept payment at the Whiskeytown visitor center. Crystal Creek Site 1 Crystal Creek Site 1 Crystal Creek Site 1 Crystal Creek Site 1 Creek View Crystal Creek Site 1 Creek View Crystal Creek Site 1 Creek View Crystal Creek Site 2 Crystal Creek Site 2 Crystal Creek Site 2 Crystal Creek Site 2 Alternate View Crystal Creek Site 2 Alternate View Crystal Creek Site 2 Alternate View Dry Creek Group Campground Dry Creek Group Campground includes two large campsites. Each site is primitive and may be reserved for groups of up to 50 people (20 people minimum). The campsites are located within oak woodland on a peninsula surrounded on three sides by Whiskeytown Lake. The primitive campground is located near Brandy Creek Marina. Dry Creek Group Camp fee 80.00 Dry Creek Group Camp costs $80 per night and is available through reservation only. Dry Creek Group Campground Dry Creek Group Campground Dry Creek Group Campground Dry Creek Group Campground site 1 Dry Creek Group Campground site 1 Dry Creek Group Campground site 1 Dry Creek Group Campground fire rings Dry Creek Group Campground fire rings Dry Creek Group Campground fire rings Dry Creek Group Campground site 2 Dry Creek Group Campground site 2 Dry Creek Group Campground site 2 Horse Camp Horse Camp is specifically for camping with horses. The open area allow ease of parking for horse trailers. Several trails are accessible from this campground. Both sites are in partial shade and feature bear-proof storage lockers, picnic tables, a lamp pole, fire pit with swing-arm BBQ grill, and a shared ADA accessible vault toilet. Each site has a maximum occupancy of 10 people and 3 vehicles. Potable water available from a spigot most the year. No corrals, tie posts/rails, or water troughs onsite. Horse Camp camping fee 20.00 This is the nightly cost for a tent-only site Maximum occupancy: 6 people and two vehicles. Pay for your site online at Recreation.gov or call toll free 1-877-444-6777. This is the only way to pay for or reserve a site at the campground. We no longer accept payment at the Whiskeytown visitor center. Horse Camp site #1 Horse Camp site #1 Horse Camp site #1 Horse Camp site #2 Horse Camp site #2 Horse Camp site #2 Guardian Rock Trail Head Sign Guardian Rock Trail Head Sign Guardian Rock Trail Head Sign Clear Creek from Guardian Rock Trail Clear Creek from Guardian Rock Trail Clear Creek from Guardian Rock Trail Peltier Bridge Sited along Clear Creek, the Peltier Bridge campground offers 9 sites and access to numerous trails. All sites offer a bear-proof storage locker, picnic table, lamp pole, fire pit with swing-arm BBQ grill, and shared access to two ADA-accessible vault toilets. Peltier Bridge camping fee 20.00 This is the nightly cost for a tent-only site. Maximum occupancy: 6 people and two vehicles. Pay for your site online at Recreation.gov or call toll free 1-877-444-6777. This is the only way to pay for or reserve a site at the campground. We no longer accept payment at the Whiskeytown visitor center. Clear Creek at Peltier Bridge Campground Clear Creek at Peltier Bridge Campground Clear Creek at Peltier Bridge Campground Peltier Bridge Campground site 9 Peltier Bridge Campground site 9 Peltier Bridge Campground site 9 Bridge into Peltier Bridge Campground Bridge into Peltier Bridge Campground Bridge into Peltier Bridge Campground Vault Restrooms at Peltier Bridge Vault Restrooms at Peltier Bridge Vault Restrooms at Peltier Bridge Peltier Bridge Campground site #4 Peltier Bridge Campground site #4 Peltier Bridge Campground site #4 Sheep Camp Sheep Camp is nestled in the mixed oak/pine/fir woodlands with nearby access to numerous trails and is a great launching point for treks up the 6,199' Shasta Bally, the highest point in Whiskeytown National Recreation Area. This campsite is closed during the winter. All sites are in partial shade and feature a bear-proof storage locker, picnic table, lamp pole, fire pit with swing-arm BBQ grill, with a shared ADA accessible vault toilet. Each site has a maximum occupancy of six people and two vehicles. Sheep Camp camping fee 20.00 This is the nightly cost for a tent-only site. Maximum occupancy: 6 people and two vehicles. Pay for your site online at Recreation.gov or call toll free 1-877-444-6777. This is the only way to pay for or reserve a site at the campground. We no longer accept payment at the Whiskeytown visitor center. Sheep Camp Site 1 Sheep Camp Site 1 Sheep Camp Site 1 Sheep Camp Site 2 Sheep Camp Site 2 Sheep Camp Site 2 Sheep Camp Site 3 Sheep Camp Site 3 Sheep Camp Site 3 Sheep Camp Site 4 Sheep Camp Site 4 Sheep Camp Site 4 Shasta Bally A snowy day on top of Shasta Bally A beautiful stop along Kennedy Memorial Drive A Beautiful Day on the Lake Crystal clear waters make for good paddling Another Way to Capture the Beauty Moonlight Kayak Tour An evening kayak tour Thousands of vistors join interpretive rangers to get a new perspective of the lake on a moonlight kayak tour Recreation Another way to enjoy the park A popular recreational activity Whiskeytown Falls A Fall Day at Whiskeytown Falls One of the four major waterfalls- Whiskeytown Falls A View from the Top Being on the Top of Shasta Bally A popular spot for visitors to get a view of the valley and mountain ranges Boulder Creek Falls A Beautiful Day at Boulder Creek Falls One of the four major waterfalls- Boulder Creek Falls JFK Memorial John F. Kennedy Memorial John F. Kennedy Memorial Glory Hole Glory Hole at Whiskeytown Lake Glory Hole at Whiskeytown Lake VC Whiskeytown NRA Visitor Center Whiskeytown NRA Visitor Center VC interior Whiskeytown NRA Visitor Center Interior Whiskeytown NRA Visitor Center Interior WNPA Western National Parks Store inside the Visitor Center Western National Parks Store inside the Visitor Center tower gravesite Levi Tower Gravesite Located in the Tower House Historic District Levi Tower Gravesite Located in the Tower House Historic District Peltier Bridge Campground Peltier Bridge Campground Peltier Bridge Campground California Tortoiseshell Clouds of California Tortoiseshells sometimes appear in the park during populations burst or mass migrations. An orange and black California Groundcone Curious about the California groundcone in Oregon and California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Purple groundcone standing next to similar looking Douglas-fir cone. Carpenter Ant Curious about carpenter ants? Explore their natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. close up photo of carpenter ant 2018 Freeman Tilden Award Recipients In 2018, six talented National Park Service employees were awarded the Freeman Tilden Award for their amazing and innovative interpretive programs. Ranger in a canyon with a typewriter on a table Pileated Woodpecker Curious about the pileated woodpecker in Oregon and California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Face and front of a woodpecker, with black body, red crest, and small blue berry in its beak. Wildland Fire in Douglas Fir: Western United States Douglas fir is widely distributed throughout the western United States, as well as southern British Columbia and northern Mexico. Douglas fir is able to survive without fire, its abundantly-produced seeds are lightweight and winged, allowing the wind to carry them to new locations where seedlings can be established. Close-up of Douglas fir bark and needles. Vascular plant hyperdiversity in high-elevation riparian communities of National Park Service units in the Klamath Network Monitoring data provide evidence of high vascular plant diversity in riparian environments. This surprising pattern indicates a high conservation significance of these park environments. Stream and forest scene at Lassen Volcanic National Park (Credit: NPS Photo) Pacific Poison Oak Curious about Pacific poison oak in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. A dense thicket of wavy edged, green leaves with some smaller, shiny, reddish leaves in the center. Giant Water Bug Curious about giant water bugs in Oregon and California? Explore their natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network.” Brown, flattened but with many whitish, columnar eggs attached to its back. Wildland Fire in Ponderosa Pine: Western United States This forest community generally exists in areas with annual rainfall of 25 inches or less. Extensive pure stands of this forest type are found in the southwestern U.S., central Washington and Oregon, southern Idaho and the Black Hills of South Dakota. Recently burned ponderosa pine forest. Ladybug Curious about ladybugs in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore their natural history in this edition of our monthly "Featured Creature," brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Cluster of small orange ladybug beetles with black spots on their backs, on vegetation. Anna's Hummingbird Curious about the Anna's hummingbird in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Small, green hummingbird with narrow bill and iridescent rose-colored feathers on throat and crown. White Alder Curious about the white alder in Oregon and California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Oval, dark green and ridged leaves of a white alder, with small, round, cone-like female catkins. Pacific Border Province The Pacific Border straddles the boundaries between several of Earth's moving plates on the western margin of North America. This region is one of the most geologically young and tectonically active in North America. The generally rugged, mountainous landscape of this province provides evidence of ongoing mountain-building. Drakes Estero in Point Reyes National Seashore. NPS photo/Sarah Codde A BAER of a Task: A Multi-Agency Team’s Mission to Assess Parkwide Damage in Whiskeytown NRA Following the Carr Fire A Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER) team spent 18 days responding to the Carr Fire, one of the most destructive wildfires in California’s history. More than 20 specialists from five agencies covered the entirety of Whiskeytown National Recreation Area (NPS) and neighboring Shasta-Trinity National Forest (USFS) and Swasey Recreation Areas (BLM). Two members of a BAER team examining burned trees and boulder debris flow Orange Sulphur Curious about the orange sulphur butterfly in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly "Featured Creature," brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Yellowish-orange butterfly with dark band along the wing edges perches with wings open. Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Series: Physiographic Provinces Descriptions of the physiographic provinces of the United States, including maps, educational material, and listings of Parks for each. George B. Dorr, founder of Acadia National Park California Pipevine Swallowtail Curious about the California pipevine swallowtail in central and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network dark-winged butterfly with orange and white spots on the undersides sitting on round white flower Whiteleaf Manzanita Curious about whiteleaf manzanita (Arctostaphylos viscida) in southern Oregon and central to northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. cluster of oval, gray-green leaves on branches, with reddish, berries that look like little apples Electrified Cat's Tail Moss Curious about electrified cat's tail moss in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Electrified cat’s tail moss in its dominant, gametophyte form. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Whiskeytown National Recreation Area, California Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] boat on lake Devonian Period—419.2 to 358.9 MYA The Devonian is part of the “Age of Fishes.” Fish fossils from Death Valley National Park shed light on the early evolution of fish in North America. Tilted Devonian rocks in Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park attest to continued Appalachian Mountain formation. fossil brachiopod Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Douglas's Squirrel Curious about the Douglas's squirrel in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Medium-sized squirrel with tawny belly, gray back, whitish eye ring, and tufts on ears, in a tree. Scientist Profile: Alice Chung-MacCoubrey, Biologist and I&M Program Manager Meet Alice Chung-MacCoubrey, ecologist and program manager for the Klamath Inventory & Monitoring Network! Discover how Alice followed her passion for wildlife and the outdoors to the National Park Service Inventory & Monitoring Program, and learn about her work studying bats. Biologist holds bat with gloved hands. Sculpins Curious about sculpins in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore their natural history in this edition of our monthly "Featured Creature," brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Fish with large head, large pectoral fins, and mottled, brown, orange, and pale green colors. Bigleaf Maple Curious about the bigleaf maple in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Lush ferns and mosses grow on the trunk of a large maple tree. Vaux's Swift Curious about the Vaux's swift in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. A small, pale brown, cigar-shaped bird with narrow, pointed wings, in flight. Coast Douglas-fir Curious about Douglas-fir in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly "Featured Creature," brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Six people in front of a very large Douglas-fir at Oregon Caves National Monument and Preserve. Pacific Madrone Curious about Pacific madrone in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly "Featured Creature," brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Close up Pacific madrone bark Oregon Grape Curious about Oregon grape in southern Oregon? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly "Featured Creature," brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Bright green, shiny leaves of a tall Oregon grape with a cluster of round blue-black berries. American Black Bear Curious about the American black bear in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Black-colored black bear with a dandelion in its mouth. The Klamath Kaleidoscope: Fall-Winter 2021 In this issue of the Klamath Kaleidoscope, we share news of the newly published geologic type section inventory of Klamath Network parks, the latest results from white-nose syndrome monitoring in bats, our new data workflow system, updates from 2021 vital signs monitoring, and recent publications. We also highlight news about Klamath Network people, including Addis Gonzalez, Sean Mohren, Sonya Daw, Jennifer Chenoweth, and Elizabeth Raynal. Kaleidoscope image of a flower and other natural scenes. Sugar Pine Curious about the sugar pine tree in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Long brown pine cone. Changing Patterns of Water Availability May Change Vegetation Composition in US National Parks Across the US, changes in water availability are altering which plants grow where. These changes are evident at a broad scale. But not all areas experience the same climate in the same way, even within the boundaries of a single national park. A new dataset gives park managers a valuable tool for understanding why vegetation has changed and how it might change in the future under different climate-change scenarios. Green, orange, and dead grey junipers in red soil, mountains in background Merlin Curious about the merlin in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Small, perched falcon with brown back, brown streaked breast, dark eyes and slight white eyebrow. Kate Camden A Native American woman, possibly Wintu, known as Kate Camden lived and worked in the Camden household in Whiskeytown, California, during the Gold Rush. She was likely born around 1844, but her original name is not known, nor are details about her life before she worked for Charles and Philena Camden. Group portrait of white family. Young, dark skinned indigenous women holds infant in background Common Snowberry Curious about the common snowberry in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Round pinkish-white berries grow along a slender stem. Checking Whiskeytown's Vital Signs In 2010, the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network—a small team of NPS scientists—began monitoring natural resources, called "vital signs," in Whiskeytown and nearby parks. Vital signs indicate park health and serve as red flags if conditions deteriorate. Results from monitoring these vital signs support park managers’ efforts to make science-based management decisions. Learn about the NPS Inventory and Monitoring Division and its work in Whiskeytown. Shallow stream with boulders is flanked by lush green vegetation. Orchard Rehabilitation Planting at Whiskeytown National Recreation Area In November 2021, NPS staff and partners met at the Tower House Historic District to re-establish an apple orchard that had been damaged by the 2018 Carr Fire. Many of the trees that were lost dated to the late 1800s. This effort involved many individuals, through the process of genetic testing, planning, grafting, re-planting, and establishing irrigation from historic and modern systems. The re-planting helps to recreate the historic character of the orchard. Flowers and leaves cover the thick branches of a historic apple tree in a grassy area Gopher Snake Curious about Pacific gopher snakes in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network Pacific gopher snake curled on rock Jumping Spider Curious about the jumping spider in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. front view of jumping spider Common Green Darner Curious about common green darner in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Two large dragonflies, connected head to tail. Greenish brown one has tail in water. Calypso Orchid Curious about Calypso orchid in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Two purple orchid flowers growing next to each other. Tailed Frog Curious about tailed frogs in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Two tailed frogs sitting side by side Taking the Pulse of U.S. National Parks How do we know if parks are healthy? We measure their vital signs, of course! Across the country, there are 32 inventory and monitoring networks that measure the status and trends of all kinds of park resources. We're learning a lot after years of collecting data. Check out these articles written for kids and reviewed by kids in partnership with the international online journal Frontiers for Young Minds. A cartoon of a ranger taking the pulse of the Earth. Series: Geologic Time—Major Divisions and NPS Fossils The National Park System contains a magnificent record of geologic time because rocks from each period of the geologic time scale are preserved in park landscapes. The geologic time scale is divided into four large periods of time—the Cenozoic Era, Mesozoic Era, Paleozoic Era, and The Precambrian. photo of desert landscape with a petrified wood log on the surface Series: Women's History in the Pacific West - California-Great Basin Collection Biographies from Northern California, Central Valley, Sierra Nevada Mountains and Nevada Map of northern California, Central Valley, Sierra Nevada Mountains and Nevada The Klamath Kaleidoscope: Fall-Winter 2022 In this issue of the Klamath Kaleidoscope, we share an article about the rocky intertidal community, as well as news about post-Dixie Fire monitoring, the upcoming Klamath Conversations gathering, vital sign monitoring this past year, and recent publications. We also highlight news about Klamath Network people, including Sean Smith’s departure, Sonya Daw’s award, intern Sarah Gwynn’s experience, and where our 2011 intern, Shadassa Ourshalimian, has landed in his career. Kaleidoscope of nature images. Common Raven Curious about the common raven in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our quarterly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Glossy black head of raven vocalizing, with long, ruffed out neck feathers. Series: Using Science to Preserve the Past Conserving our nation’s rich cultural heritage – the stories, places, traditions, and artifacts that make up the fabric of our shared history – is an important part of the NPS mission. Throughout the Pacific West Region, park archeologists and paleontologists, museum curators, historic preservationists, and more are using scientific practices to better steward the cultural resources they protect. Explore these articles to learn more about their work. Museum object of cat-like nimravid skull with large incisors Conversations about Conservation: Eight years of scientific sharing in northern California and southern Oregon The annual December 2022 gathering of Klamath Conversations, a meeting of the parks within the National Park Service’s Klamath Network, hosted 19 presenters across a wide variety of topics. Not surprisingly, the topic of wildland fire dominated the talks, as network parks have burned extensively over the past few years. A person on stage behind a podium with a large screen nearby that reads 'Some Like It Hot'. Podcast 046: Restoration of the Camden House Orchard with arborist Rico Montenegro Paul Cady speaks with Rico Montenegro, Chief Arborist for The Fruit Tree Planting Foundation, about pruning neglected historic orchards. From Camden House orchard at Whiskeytown National National Recreation Area to Turtle Bay in Redding, CA, Mr. Montenegro teaches pruning techniques to arborists and volunteers. Once nearly dead, this tree made a remarkable comeback through restorative pruning. The Klamath Kaleidoscope: Spring-Summer 2023 In this issue of the Klamath Kaleidoscope, we welcome the network’s new vegetation program lead, share updates to our invasive species early detection protocol, and summarize good news from the second year of water chemistry sampling for heavy metals and insecticides in network parks. We also welcome the contributions of temporary staff joining our team this year, and highlight where science writing intern, Natalie DiNenno, has landed in her career. Kaleidoscope of nature images. American Marten Curious about the American marten in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our quarterly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Small brown mammal with orange throat and pointed ears in the snow Coming Full Circle: How Parks Are Using Conventional Tools in New Ways to Restore Imperiled Forests Depriving western old-growth forests of fire brought them to the brink. Now the fire they need also threatens them. To fix this, parks are returning to mechanical forestry methods. Firefighter walks next to a giant sequoia in a smoke-filled scene. Project Profile: Increase Native Seed Production for 14 California Parks The National Park Service is collaborating with a range of partners to increase regional production capacity for appropriate native plant seed to restore native coastal prairies, interior grasslands and wet meadows, habitat for threatened and endangered species, and provide capacity for post-fire recovery. a person stands in a field of tall grass The Klamath Kaleidoscope: Fall-Winter 2023 In this issue of the Klamath Kaleidoscope, we discuss the listing of whitebark pine as threatened under the Endangered Species Act, say farewell to interim vegetation program lead Jackie Lucero, share updates from lake chemistry monitoring after the Dixie Fire, celebrate bat outreach at Lassen Volcanic National Park, and highlight where lake crewmember, Daniel Chambers, has landed in his career. Kaleidoscope-shaped collage of images from nature.
Park Guide National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Whiskeytown National Recreation Area The Whiskeytown Nugget Happy 100th Birthday National Park Service! Welcome to Whiskeytown! Inside you will find: Mather in the class of 1886, Albright, in the class significant political battles to save both special of 1912. Both were from California. The energetic lands and cultural resources from those who Stephen Mather was a millionaire advertisement wanted to destroy or develop these resources for executive who had made his fortune marketing personal profit and private use. Borax soap; Albright was a young lawyer who advised Mather as they took over management of this new agency in 1916, created to protect the dozen national parks mostly found in the America West. Multiple generations of families in the United the world have recreated and been inspired by countless visits to our national park sites. Thousands of rangers, maintenance and administrative staff have protected the parks Albright at my friends Scott and Susan Isaacson’s from threats and watched over visitors enjoying wedding. Albright was 92 years old, a living the parks for over a century. This will continue In 2015, Whiskeytown National Recreation legend and deeply respected for his work with the into the future, and our goal as stewards of these Area celebrated it 50th Anniversary. This dynamic Stephen Mather and following Mather’s special places, is to keep them as they are for year we celebrate the 100th anniversary of the death in 1930, as the second Director of the the enjoyment of future generations to come. National Park Service. National parks such as National Park Service. Enjoy Whiskeytown National Recreation Area of Yosemite National Park were set aside for Throughout my career I have met many of the protection and preservation by President key men and women who continued to make Lincoln, as early as 1864. significant contributions to develop the National Park Service and its assets into a remarkable gift Two men played a key role in creating the for the American people. Many of these people- National Park Service, as we know it today; they -some as staff of the National Park Service, were Stephen Mather and Horace Albright. others as concerned private citizens, have fought Both had attended U.C. Berkeley, the older and be safe as you explore the park. I want all of you to take with you happy memories of your friends and family as you enjoy Whisketyown and other national park sites during this special anniversary year. Jim Milestone Park Superintendent Support Your Park with Entrance Fees Your park fees provide funding for projects that improve and enhance the experience for visitors. Applying fees to projects in the area where they were collected assures that visitors pay a share of operational costs. Eighty percent of the fees collected at Whiskeytown are returned to the park for specific projects. Recent projects have replaced the Oak Bottom Beach restroom and changing facility, renovated the campground store, and replaced informational kiosks. Future projects include improving and expanding our 52-year-old Visitor Center. For the one-time or short-term visitor, seven day passes are sold for $10 at the Visitor Center and at pay-by-envelope stations around the park. For frequent visitors, an annual park pass is sold at the visitor center for $40 and covers the entrance fee to Lassen Volcanic National Park as well. Both passes are also now sold online at the Pay.gov website. 2016 Passes Access Pass Interagency Annual Pass No charge - permanent $80 - Valid for one year from disability - Valid for a lifetime. month of purchase. Whiskeytown Annual Pass $40 - Valid for one year from month of purchase. Lassen Annual Pass $40 - Valid for one year from month of purchase. This compilation of essential park information is based on questions frequently asked by visitors and organized alphabetically to help you quickly find what you are looking for. States and millions of tourists from around In 1982, I had the honor of meeting Horace Yellowstone, date back to 1872 and portions Things you need to know, pages 2-3 Fourth Grade Pass Free - Valid for all fourth grade students and their families for the school year. Senior Pass $10 - 62 years and older Valid for a lifetime. Military Annual Pass No charge for active duty service members and their dependents. National Park Service turns 100! Pages 4-5 This year marks the National Park Service's 100th Birthday! Flip to pages 4 and 5 to read about celebrating with YOUR park. Learn about some historical milestones, and what we have planned for you this centennial year. Camping and trail information, pages 6-7 If you are planning an outdoor adventure, flip to pages 6 and 7 for a list of the park’s extensive trail system and campgrounds, essential information for each. A map will orient you to the park. What can I do in the time I have and

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