"Early Morning at Cinnamon Bay" by Anne Finney , public domain

Virgin Islands

National Park - Virgin Islands

The Virgin Islands National Park covers approximately 60% of the island of Saint John in the United States Virgin Islands, over 5,500 acres of adjacent ocean, plus nearly all of Hassel Island, just off the Charlotte Amalie, Saint Thomas harbor. The park is famous for scuba diving and snorkeling and has miles of hiking trails through the tropical rainforest. Cruz Bay is the gateway port to the park. Ferries operate hourly from Red Hook, St. Thomas, thrice daily from Charlotte Amalie, St. Thomas and West End, Tortola, twice daily from Jost Van Dyke, and twice weekly from Virgin Gorda.

location

maps

Official Visitor Map of Virgin Islands National Park (NP) on Virgin Islands. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Virgin Islands - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Virgin Islands National Park (NP) on Virgin Islands. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official Visitor Map to Lind Point at Virgin Islands National Park (NP) on Virgin Islands. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Virgin Islands - Lind Point

Official Visitor Map to Lind Point at Virgin Islands National Park (NP) on Virgin Islands. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official Visitor Map to Hassel Island at Virgin Islands National Park (NP) on Virgin Islands. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Virgin Islands - Hassel Island

Official Visitor Map to Hassel Island at Virgin Islands National Park (NP) on Virgin Islands. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

brochures

Marine Guide to Virgin Islands National Park (NP). Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Virgin Islands - Marine Guide

Marine Guide to Virgin Islands National Park (NP). Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Overview Map of Virgin Islands National Park (NP). Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Virgin Islands - Overview Map

Overview Map of Virgin Islands National Park (NP). Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of The U.S. Virgin Islands Caribbean Setting for Virgin Islands National Park (NP). Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Virgin Islands - Caribbean Setting

Map of The U.S. Virgin Islands Caribbean Setting for Virgin Islands National Park (NP). Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of St. Thomas Island at Virgin Islands National Park (NP). Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Virgin Islands - St. Thomas Island Map

Map of St. Thomas Island at Virgin Islands National Park (NP). Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of St. John Island at Virgin Islands National Park (NP). Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Virgin Islands - St. John Island Map

Map of St. John Island at Virgin Islands National Park (NP). Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of St. Croix Island at Virgin Islands National Park (NP). Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Virgin Islands - St. Croix Island Map

Map of St. Croix Island at Virgin Islands National Park (NP). Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of Buck Island at Virgin Islands National Park (NP). Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Virgin Islands - Buck Island Map

Map of Buck Island at Virgin Islands National Park (NP). Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Sea Turtles at Virgin Islands National Park (NP). Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Virgin Islands - Sea Turtles

Sea Turtles at Virgin Islands National Park (NP). Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Fishes at Virgin Islands National Park (NP). Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Virgin Islands - Fishes

Fishes at Virgin Islands National Park (NP). Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Birds at Virgin Islands National Park (NP). Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Virgin Islands - Birds List

Birds at Virgin Islands National Park (NP). Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Birds in Pictures at Virgin Islands National Park (NP). Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Virgin Islands - Birds Photo Guide

Birds in Pictures at Virgin Islands National Park (NP). Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Trees at Virgin Islands National Park (NP). Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Virgin Islands - Trees

Trees at Virgin Islands National Park (NP). Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Corals at Virgin Islands National Park (NP). Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Virgin Islands - Corals

Corals at Virgin Islands National Park (NP). Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Plants to Avoid while Hiking at Virgin Islands National Park (NP). Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Virgin Islands - Plants to Avoid

Plants to Avoid while Hiking at Virgin Islands National Park (NP). Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Things to Avoid while in Water at Virgin Islands National Park (NP). Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Virgin Islands - Things to Avoid in Water

Things to Avoid while in Water at Virgin Islands National Park (NP). Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/viis/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virgin_Islands_National_Park The Virgin Islands National Park covers approximately 60% of the island of Saint John in the United States Virgin Islands, over 5,500 acres of adjacent ocean, plus nearly all of Hassel Island, just off the Charlotte Amalie, Saint Thomas harbor. The park is famous for scuba diving and snorkeling and has miles of hiking trails through the tropical rainforest. Cruz Bay is the gateway port to the park. Ferries operate hourly from Red Hook, St. Thomas, thrice daily from Charlotte Amalie, St. Thomas and West End, Tortola, twice daily from Jost Van Dyke, and twice weekly from Virgin Gorda. Go beyond Virgin Islands National Park's stunning white-sand beaches. Hike to historic plantation sites to learn about a challenging past when sugar and enslaved labor dominated life on the island. Visit the Indigenous Taino's ancient petroglyphs. Snorkel coral reefs to discover hidden marine life. Two-thirds of the island of St. John is national park, making it a unique destination for visitors. There are no airports on St. John so you must fly to the St. Thomas Cyril E. King Airport (code STT) and travel from there. From the airport you rent a car and drive or take a taxi to Redhook (west end) St. Thomas. From there you can either take a car barge to St. John or the people ferry. Once on St. John you can easily walk from the ferry terminal to the Visitor Center. Cruz Bay Visitor Center Visitor and Information Center for Virgin Islands National Park and Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument. The Visitor Center is just a short, five minute walk (approximately two blocks) from the public ferry dock. Head north north on route 20. Cinnamon Bay Beach and Campground The campground offers bare tent sites, eco-tents, and cottages. Amenities include restrooms, showers, food and beverage service, watersports rentals, beach wheelchairs, and more. Bare site 50.00 Bare site rentals include a wood platform with rain cover, picnic table and charcoal grill. No bedding, cookware or towels are provided. You must provide your own tent, sleep gear and cooking gear. Those items are available to rent but must be reserved in advance due to limited quantity. For your safety, guests cannot sleep in hammocks or open on platforms. . Bare sites sleep 2 adults and 2 kids max. Bare site with tent rental includes a 4 person sized tent and bedding and linens. Eco-Tent 190.00 Eco-tents are a more comfortable camping experience. Each rental has a fan, light, electric outlet, queen size bed, linens, bath towels, cooking kit, picnic table, chairs on the porch and can comfortably sleep 2 people. Eco-Tent Family 210.00 The family version of the eco-tent includes extra space with twin bunks in addition to the queen bed and can sleep 4 people. Everything included with the eco-tent is the same for the family tent. Eco-Tent Bunk 190.00 Eco-Tent Bunks is a group area where tents are closer together, perfect for groups or when available for guests who need 4 beds. Each tent has two twin bunks and can sleep 4 people. Eco-Tent Oceanside 215.00 Eco-tents are a more comfortable camping experience. Each rental has a fan, light, electric outlet, queen size bed, linens, bath towels, cooking kit, picnic table, chairs on the porch and can comfortably sleep 2 people. Eco-Tent Family Oceanside 245.00 The family version of the eco-tent includes extra space with twin bunks in addition to the queen bed and can sleep 4 people. Everything included with the eco-tent is the same for the family tent. Cottage 230.00 Need a little more than a tent to be comfortable? The cottages offer a more substantial accommodation. They are solid concrete buildings with screen/louver windows and doors on front and rear that have ceiling fans/lights, electric outlet, a queen bed, day bed/sofa (w/trundle), linens, bath towels, cooking kit, small indoor table and chairs, mini fridge, grill, picnic table and two outdoor chairs per unit. The queen bed and day bed are in separate rooms. Each cottage can sleep 4 people. Terrace Cottage 280.00 Need a little more than a tent to be comfortable? The cottages offer a more substantial accommodation. They are solid concrete buildings with screen/louver windows and doors on front and rear that have ceiling fans/lights, electric outlet, a queen bed, day bed/sofa (w/trundle), linens, bath towels, cooking kit, small indoor table and chairs, mini fridge, grill, picnic table and two outdoor chairs per unit. The queen bed and day bed are in separate rooms. Each cottage can sleep 4 people. Terrace Cottage Oceanside 315.00 Need a little more than a tent to be comfortable? The cottages offer a more substantial accommodation. They are solid concrete buildings with screen/louver windows and doors on front and rear that have ceiling fans/lights, electric outlet, a queen bed, day bed/sofa (w/trundle), linens, bath towels, cooking kit, small indoor table and chairs, mini fridge, grill, picnic table and two outdoor chairs per unit. The queen bed and day bed are in separate rooms. Each cottage can sleep 4 people. Cottage Oceanside 275.00 Need a little more than a tent to be comfortable? The cottages offer a more substantial accommodation. They are solid concrete buildings with screen/louver windows and doors on front and rear that have ceiling fans/lights, electric outlet, a queen bed, day bed/sofa (w/trundle), linens, bath towels, cooking kit, small indoor table and chairs, mini fridge, grill, picnic table and two outdoor chairs per unit. The queen bed and day bed are in separate rooms. Each cottage can sleep 4 people. Bare site A blue and grey tent pitched on a wood platform with a blue tarp with woods in the background Bare tent site at Cinnamon Bay Beach and Campground Trunk Bay Turquoise water laps white sandy shore fringed with lush green vegetation. Renowned for its beauty, Trunk Bay is a visitor favorite. Queen Angel Fish Queen Angel Fish A Beautiful Queen Angel Fish Sunset Bench at Lind Point A sunset colors the horizon as seen from an overlook above the bay. Lind Point Overlook is a perfect spot to enjoy a Virgin Islands sunset. Four Stilts for the Bird Watchers Four Stilts in the Francis Bay Pond Four Stilts in the Francis Bay Pond Sunset Paddle A Sunset Paddle A Sunset Paddle, a perfect end to your day. Friends Make the Best Partners Virgin Islands National Park and Coral Reef National Monument Celebrate National Philanthropy Day with a tribute to Friends of Virgin Islands National Park. Friends of Virgin Islands National Park was established in 1980, incorporated in 1988 and will be celebrating their 30th anniversary the end of this year. Friends of Virgin Islands National Park Logo VIIS Turtle Monitoring Report 2017 The St. John Sea Turtle Monitoring and Protection Program, funded by the Friends of the Virgin Islands National Park, wrapped up the 2017 season with great success. The project’s aim was to conduct island-wide nesting surveys and foster awareness for sea turtle conservation. Turtle Nesting on St. John The State of Our Reefs Post Irma Dr. Caroline Rogers and Jeff Miller gave presentations to the public on April 7, 2018. The presentations provided information on the damage caused to the coral reefs, marine life and mangroves in the Virgin Islands National Park and Coral Reef National Monument. Find out here what is recovering and what may not. Mangroves Recovery David Hamilton Jackson David Hamilton Jackson Teacher, Union Leader, Newspaper Founder, Councilman,Judge, Hero. David Hamilton Jackson Petroglyphs of Reef Bay Within the deep interior of the Reef Bay valley rests one of St. John’s most important clues to a lost culture from the island’s past, the petroglyphs. This captivating place is located at the base of the valley’s highest waterfall, surrounded by the island’s lush tropical vegetation. Here, mysterious faces are found carved into the fall’s blue basalt rock. Image of the petroglyphs located off the Reef Bay Trail in St. John. A Perfect Home for Pirates & Privateers The Virgin Islands’ geographical features and strategic location were key factors in the struggles for control of the islands. The Virgin Islands consist of approximately 90 islands, islets, and cays, all of which are within no more than a day’s sail from each other and some of which are within sight of Puerto Rico. USS Congress part of U.S. Navy squadron of 1822-1842 VIIS YCC 2017 Virgin Islands National Park YCC Team 2017 update. YCC team visiting Catherineberg Ruins. Maho Pavilions These new pavilions are being installed through the support of the Friends of Virgin Islands National Park; they replace the structures destroyed by Hurricane Irma with three smaller pavilions that will be more resilient to storms. Crystal Clear: Nutrient Source Identification for Nearshore Reefs in Virgin Islands National Park Scientists have documented a decline in live coral at Virgin Islands National Park over the past few decades. This decrease has been from episodes of coral disease, intense storms, increased sea water temperatures, and damage from boats overlook looking at an ocean bay heavily wooded with shrubs Archaeology and Cinnamon Bay We discovered a little white house on the beach, one of the oldest standing structures in the Virgin Island’s dating back to the 1600s. Having objects made by the people and cultures that came before us on display, provided a timeline of physical proof of the islands' rich past, inspiring a new appreciation for our heritage in both an older and younger generation and a desire to preserve these treasures for all to enjoy. Little house at Cinnamon bay was the oldest house on St. John. National Park Getaway: Virgin Islands National Park Emerging from the tropical forest, you’ll pass colonial sugar plantation ruins to finally arrive at a white, sandy beach with inviting, crystal blue waters. What better way to end a hike? This may not sound like your typical national park excursion, but that’s the experience you can have in the area known as “America’s paradise” at Virgin Islands National Park. Clear blue water washing up on a sandy and rocky beach Park Air Profiles - Virgin Islands National Park Air quality profile for Virgin Islands National Park. Gives park-specific information about air quality and air pollution impacts for Virgin Islands NP as well as the studies and monitoring conducted for Virgin Islands NP. Spotfin Butterfly fish and coral reef Boy Scouts Explore Park through Sailing Program Every Friday morning this summer, a troop of slightly weary but content boy scouts arrive at the Virgin Islands National Park Visitor Center, led by Captain Bryan Barnes. This is the concluding day of the scouts’ weeklong sailing trip around St. John, and the last stop before they return to St. Thomas for their flight home. Boy Scouts sailing the Virgin Island National Park Reef Bay Trail Rehabilitation Virgin Islands National Park wants to thank Great Smoky Mountain Trail Crew for their tremendous work in rehabilitate the Reef Bay Trail. In addition to clearing the trail much of it had to be reconstructed or redirected. Smoky Mountain Trail Crew Uniforms for the Caribbean Did you know that employees from across the National Park Service stepped up to help their fellow employees after hurricanes hit the US Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico? In September of 2017, Hurricane Irma, one of the strongest known hurricanes in the Atlantic, lashed the Caribbean and Florida. It was followed within days by Hurricane Maria, another devastating hurricane that also hit Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands, among other places. Boxes line a hallway awaiting shipment to parks in the Caribbean. Photo by Kristine Brunsman Making Contact with the Archeological Record: Identifying Contact Period Sites on St. John, US Virgin Islands Relationships between Taino and Island-Carib Indians, Europeans, and Africans during European contact and colonization set the stage for cultural interaction across the Virgin Islands. By understanding social relations during this tempestuous period of Caribbean proto-history, archeologists aim to know about interactions between indigenous populations, Europeans, and Africans during the early period of European expansion and its importance to global history. Artifacts from St. Johns Creating Beautiful Spaces Through Landscape Architecture Learn more about Landscape Architect Kate Randall and the type of work she does for NPS. Kate standing in outdoor area of a building in Christiansted, St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands. Series: Crystal Clear: A Call to Action In 2016, the nation celebrates the centennial of the National Park Service (NPS) as the steward of special places that represent our natural and cultural heritage. Many national parks were founded on the beauty and value of water. Since the preservation of the Old Faithful Geyser in Yellowstone National Park in 1872, the National Park System has grown to include significant examples within majestic rivers, the Great Lakes, oceans and coasts, and other spectacular water resources. bright blue lake green islands in between Series: Park Air Profiles Clean air matters for national parks around the country. Photo of clouds above the Grand Canyon, AZ NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Virgin Islands National Park, Virgin Islands Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] coast and beach Data Manager Profile: Judd Patterson Meet Judd Patterson, Data Manager for the South Florida Caribbean Network. As a data manager, helps wrangle all the information that we collect on the health of our park resources. Judd is excited about the stories data can tell through time, whether that's looking back at park records from over a hundred years ago, or making sure the science we do in our parks today become time capsules for future generations to learn about how things were back in 2021. Data manager Judd Patterson smiles at the camera while holding camera equiment. The Job is His, Not Yours In the early 1950s, park wives continued to function as they had from the 1920s to the 1940s. The NPS still got Two For the Price of One, relying on women to keep monuments in the Southwest running, to give freely of their time and talents, to build and maintain park communities, and to boost morale among park staffs. With the creation of the Mission 66 Program to improve park facilities, the NPS found new ways to put some park wives to (unpaid) work. Man and woman with telescope Maritime Heritage at the Virgin Islands Based on archival research, several hundred shipwrecks are thought to be in the waters surrounding the U.S. Virgin Islands. Many ships wrecked on reefs and rocks. Many others were lost during hurricanes, the great tsunami of 1867, and other natural disasters. Other ships were attacked during times of war or inter-European rivalries to keep colonies from prospering. Commercial boat at St. Thomas Lost in Paradise: Placing the African Diaspora Individuals and social groups transitioned from enslavement to freedom on St. Croix in the Danish West Indies during the 18th century. The emergence of Crucian communities as people and as places was intimately linked to the formation of local identities and the negotiation of social and economic mobility within the contexts of Danish colonialism as much as the “Africanisms” that are often the focal point of diaspora studies. Buck Island’s Corals Get Relief from a Deadly Disease Through trial and error, outreach, and a small army of volunteer divers, scientists slow the progress of one of the Caribbean’s most lethal coral diseases—for now. A diver treats a large round brown coral with antibiotic Taking the Pulse of U.S. National Parks How do we know if parks are healthy? We measure their vital signs, of course! Across the country, there are 32 inventory and monitoring networks that measure the status and trends of all kinds of park resources. We're learning a lot after years of collecting data. Check out these articles written for kids and reviewed by kids in partnership with the international online journal Frontiers for Young Minds. A cartoon of a ranger taking the pulse of the Earth. Guide to the Thomas J. Allen Photograph Collection Finding aid for the Thomas J. Allen Photographs in the NPS History Collection. 50 Nifty Finds #16: Uniformity and Diversity A National Park Service (NPS) uniform weaves together the unique story of the person who wore it and the NPS mission. Sometimes the uniforms and their stories also reflect a larger history for the NPS and American society. That’s the case for the uniforms worn by Robert G. Stanton who began his career during the civil rights era and went on to become the first African American director of the NPS. Green NPS uniform coat, shirt, and tie on a mannequin. Project Profile: Southeast Parks Coral Diversity Restoration The National Park Service will take a multi-faceted approach to coral management by implementing disease treatment, on-the-ground restoration, research, and other management actions to increase coral reef health. a diver in scuba gear examines coral Project Profile: Restore coral in U.S. Virgin Islands parks The National Park Service will provide amoxicillin treatment of corals infected with Stony Coral Tissue Loss Disease for 25 species of coral at four Caribbean parks – Buck Island Reef National Monument, Salt River Bay National Historical Park & Ecological Preserve, Virgin Islands National Park, Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument. a diver in scuba gear uses a syringe to inject coral Project Profile: Treat and Restore Coral in Six Parks The National Park Service will take a multi-faceted approach to coral management by implementing disease treatment, on-the-ground restoration, research, and other management actions to increase coral reef health. a scuba diver outplants coral underwater
Virgin Islands Virgin Islands National Park Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument U.S. Virgin Islands Mooring photos by Jack Hopkins Mariner’s Resource Protection Guide Candis Davis Using the National Park Mooring System VIRGIN ISLANDS NATIONAL PARK WAS ESTABLISHED BY to some of the very features that visitors travel here to Congress in 1956 to preserve the natural and cultural enjoy. The coral reefs, seagrass beds, and algal plains have resources on St. John. In 1962, park boundaries were been heavily damaged by the anchors and anchor chains expanded to include 5,650 acres of submerged lands of boats. Although the weight of the anchor crushes adjacent to the island. In 1978, much of Hassel Island in marine life, the greatest impact is caused by the anchor St. Thomas was added to the park. The park is a UNESCO chain sweeping and scouring the area clean of plants and Biosphere Reserve, part of an international network of animals as the boat swings with changes in wind direction. conservation. A presidential proclamation created Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument in 2001, adding been established around the more sensitive reef and 12,708 acres of adjoining federal submerged lands to the seagrass areas to allow visitors to use these areas while National Park System. protecting resources from anchor and chain damage. These waters are popular cruising grounds for thousands This guide helps boaters preserve the park’s marine of pleasure boaters. The number of boats increased resources so that future generations will have the dramatically in the 1980s, resulting in escalating damage opportunity to enjoy them. Although day use of the park moorings is free, a self-registration fee of $26 per night is required for overnight anchoring or mooring between the hours of 5:00 p.m. and 7:00 a.m. Golden Age/ Access Pass holders pay half price. Overnight fees must be paid before spending the night. This revenue helps offset the cost of maintaining the moorings. For your convenience, payment stations have been placed at the following locations: • Land-Based Fee Stations: Cruz Bay National Park Service (NPS) Finger Pier, Saltpond Beach, and Great Lameshur Bay (pier), Mariners must use moorings in park waters if they are available and the vessel is of appropriate size. Size is based on length overall (LOA). LOA is defned in 50 CFR 679.2 as the centerline longitudinal distance, rounded to the nearest foot, measured between: (1) The outside foremost part of the vessel visible above the waterline, including bulwarks (section of a vessel’s side continuing above main desk), but excluding bowsprits and similar fttings or attachments, and (2) The outside aftermost part of the vessel visible above the waterline, including bulwarks but excluding rudders, outboard motor brackets, and similar fttings or attachments. For larger vessels or when moorings are full, vessels anchoring must use one of three designated anchorages for their vessel size as follows: Caroline Rogers Striped sergeant majors, rainbow colored parrotfsh, and spiny lobsters are just a few of the species living on the reef. Some fsh, such as snappers and grunts, migrate daily from the shelter of reefs to feed in adjacent NPS-Marine Guide12415PRESSREADY.indd 1 Healthy brain coral (above), and one damaged by a boat (below). More Information seagrass beds at night. Federally protected green sea turtles and locally protected queen conch also depend on seagrass for food. The juveniles of many species rely on both mangrove and seagrass habitats, moving to deeper water and offshore reefs as they mature. Seagrasses are fowering marine plants that spread primarily through root growth. These roots also help to retain sediments and reduce shoreline erosion, resulting in improved water quality. When anchors rip up seagrasses, what’s left is a scarred sea foor that may take years to recover. Important food sources for marine animals are also destroyed and crystal clear water becomes cloudy with sediment. Cruz Bay Visitor Center Open Daily 8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. (340) 776-6201 ext. 238 www.nps.gov/viis www.nps.gov/vicr • Lind Point Anchor Area: Private vessels up to 125 LOA may anchor: 18° 20’ 22” N and 64° 48’ 8” W, 18° 20’ 34” N and 64° 47’ 48” W, 18° 20’ 34” N and 64° 48’ 8” W, 18° 20’ 22” N and 64° 47’ 51” W; (no buoys mark this area). • Pay stations are identifed by a green fag with the NPS Arrowhead logo. • Floating pay stations are for the sole purpose of paying fees. All other activities are prohibited, including swimming and fshing. Anchoring is prohibited elsewhere in the park and in the monument. Overnight stays in park waters are limited to 30 nights in a calendar year and no more than seven consecutive nights in one bay. Monument moorings are day-use only. • Vessels up to 60 feet LOA use white mooring with blue stripe; • Vessels 61–100 feet LOA use big boat moorings - white mooring with red stripe. On the south shore of
AT L A N T I C OCEAN Jost Van Dyke Virgin Gorda TORTOLA ST THOMAS ST JOHN US UK Road Town Hassel Island Charlotte Amalie Virgin Islands National Park Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument CARIBBEAN Salt River Bay National Historical Park and Ecological Preserve North Frederiksted ST CROIX SEA Christiansted National Historic Site Buck Island Reef National Monument 0 0 5 10 Km 5 10 Mi
U E D I T N S T A T E S The U.S. Virgin Islands Caribbean Setting A T L A N T I C GULF OF MEXICO TH O C E A N E M C Campeche MA S B A St John St Thomas G O R IZE EL LA A W E A S T N I I T N CARIBBEAN P A C I F I C L St Croix D RA Aruba R Coral reef Panama Canal 400 Miles A N A M A P 100 CA 0 400 Kilometers Gulf of Panama C O L Curacao Bonaire N V E O M B I A St Lucia St Vincent WIN Isla de Margarita A RI North ST Martinique Grenada UA CO 100 S ANTILLES G O C E A N 0 Dominica Buck Island E I ER SEA LESSE CA S E Montserrat Guadeloupe SS S DOR L LE TILLE DURAS HON NI Antigua Puerto Rico DS Honduras I AN JAMAIC R St-Barthélemy Barbuda AN S AE L LV A Gulf of E Tortola Anguilla St Martin/ St Maarten L rench T Cayman T DO RE MINIC PUB AN LIC rto Pue Virgin Passage LEEW AR Tr e n c h D S M A ITI E GUAT B A E HA Cayman Islands Rico D I SLANDS I Bay of HA E E L Z U A Barbados AR X C U BA W E Straits of Florida D Trinidad Tobago
St. Thomas: Getting Your Island Bearings AT L A N T I C Pelican Cay O C E A N Little Hans Lollik Island Cricket Rock Rough Point B RAS Hans Lollik Island Outer Brass Island Cave Cove S C HA Coconut Bay NNEL Picara Point Inner Brass Island Tropaco Point e Bordeaux Point E N S BA 37 Crown Mtn 33 1556ft 474m 301 ST CHARLOTTE 40 38 ay hB l ne erg db R I Shark Island Red Hook Steven Cay Ferry Dock Coculus Point Great St James Island St James Bay erry Long Point C ha F Patrick B ay Point uz a li e r l o tte A m -C r ST J E AM S T CU Little St James Island Dog Island S E A Buck Island National Wildlife Refuge Deck Point Jersey Bay Cas Cay Capella Islands Capella Bay D Frenchman Bay Green Cay N C A R I B B E A N GE Henley Cay Cruz Bay ST JOHN Great Bay 32 30 U Flamingo Point SA o o k - C r u z B a y Fe r ry Red H Redhook Bay ay S PA Visitor Center O Hassel Island D ay Ferry Dock S WA TE W AR go C Y Lin IL W ND 32 ay National Park System lands Grass Cay 38 lus B Seagrass Smith Bay 30 Cocu Mangrove Mingo Cay R Carol Point Sprat Point P Water Bay 40 Little Coral reef E Bluebeard Castle or 2 THATCH CAY arb 1 Mile G L o v an s H 2 Kilometers A 42 oma annel B ingo rie C h Druif Bay r ege 0 1 S Coki Bay North 0 Lee Point 39 Long Bay St Th Crown Bay Submarine Base an Ch Krum rie Bay e g ND Mosquito re LA Point W G IS Flam Saba Island Montalvan Point AMALIE Kings Wharf 30 Flat Cays Turtledove Cay Tutu Bay 42 Blackbeard’s Tower EG AD S 33 Red Point RO A 39 Ferry Dock Cyril E. King Airport EST P U y THW Mandal Bay B University of the Virgin Islands Ba SOU Y 33 Congo Cay S el Fortuna Lucas Bay Point nn David Point D L Ru Barents Bay R GE 33 Perseverance Bay Black Point Brewerg Bay A Lovenlund Bay T H O M A S 35 40 30 W 40 334 30 E SA rr e G S PA Cu 37 Santa Maria Bay Botany Bay Sandy Bay Big Hull Bay Bay nt Botany Point LE A LE Hol Stumpy Bay drik Ruy Point DD West Cay Hen Mail Kastel Bay Point MI Stumpy Point Caret Point M Vluck Point
D NARROW ay - S Cruz Bay - Road Town Ferr er ee H Ba aul y ov Cr k ew Elk Bay fou nd EAST END NBay Hansen Bay ROUND BAY Blackrock Hill 499ft 152m East End Bay y BAY Privateer Bay Lo Privateer Point Pond Bay Red Point na l L NE AN E G S A Leduck Island S PA N C oral na l on um en t C A R I B B E A N N M Ram Head A FL io at 200ft 61m EAGLE SHOAL N Booby Rock A Kiddel Point Salt Drunk Bay Trail Pond Drunk Bay am G Bay Saltpond Bay d on ltp Bay Sa A t io Nanny Point Saltpond Bay Trail del Na Long Point ef National Park System lands Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument was created in 2001 by presidential proclamation from 12,708 acres of federal submerged lands. Cabritte Horn Point ef nt Seagrass Private property exists within the boundary of the park. Respect property owners’ rights; do not trespass. Re me Mangrove Johns Folly Bay Mo nu Coral reef al r Re 1 or Gowed Point Johns Folly a d Tr il ea H 1 Kilometer 0.5 Mile Sabbat Point R 0 e a ux Virgin Islands C en n Ba ebe y ck Lagoon Point Friis Bay Kid Dittlif Point D 0.5 o rd Virgin Islands National Park N 0 S ate W CORAL Minna Hill 989ft 301m Yawzi Point Trail otp a Bayn U Bovocoap Point I FF 10 Calabash Boom Lameshur CL M y Turner Point Virgin Islands Environmental Resource Station (VIERS) B ITE Ba Limetree Cove Johnson Bay Gro SO RENDEZVOUS BAY WH s Otter Creek HURRICANE HOLE 107 Gr ol oc Y Devers Bay Cocoloba Cay REEF BAY Mardenboro Point es Popilleau Bay Mo u nt a i n Trai l N BE le Ho e Hart Bay at UR Ch Cocoloba Point l SB North Klein Bay ai LL IA B L U FF FISH BAY c rin Sanders Bay Tr Reef Bay Sugar Mill (ruins) P es h Ba ur y RID GE Hill y Boatman Point ta L ameshu REEF BAY Ba PI Monte Bay un BAY ek Palestina Fortsberg 426ft 130m CORAL HARBOR re Harbor Point Bordeaux Mountain 1277ft 389m Petroglyph Trail 104 GREAT CRUZ BAY Mo r E CORAL eshu r Bay Road J O H N Petroglyphs Genti Bay AR ux Gift Hill Ferry Dock 108 d Roa S T CRUZ BAY Gif t Ca ne el H h ill Camelberg Peak 1193ft 364m SI M 108 in Can ee R ea Lind ne r C ck Carolina d oa rd Tr a i l Cruz Visitor Center Bay Tu Ba r ner y e rl i Coral Bay Bo rry Margaret Hill 10 Frank Bay Cent Emmaus Moravian Church 10 Trail Caneel Hill Hill Cruz Bay Ferry Fe l 20 Hermitage Mamey Peak 1147ft 350m y nt Tr Po i l ai 10 BAY Bo Ba Biosphere Reserve Center Lind Point Catherineberg Sugar Mill (ruins) Water Catchment Trail Bay Tr a i l am Caneel Bay Salomon oon Bay ym pur ne a c S o H Be B r o wn 10 Reef Hawksnest Bay t CH Peter Peak en l B AT Trunk Bay ation a nu m l Cinn ruins ds N Brown Bay hn n 20 20 Ro a d ter B Lam Shore North Jo Annaberg a y Trail Sugar Mill (ruins) MAHO Peter CINNAMON BAY Bay TRUNK BAY Jumbie Bay Waterlemon Bay in s I slan tL Peace Hill HAWKSNEST BAY Cinnamon Cay Bay Trail on am Henley Cay ruins Underwater Trail Trunk Cay Maho Point America MAHO Point BAY Little Turtle Bay Perkins Cay Denis Bay Campground Annaberg School (ruins) Virgi n ea Hawksnest Point NG I Ramgoat Cay Cinnamon Bay Le Europ a Bay D OE Johnsons Reef FRANCIS BAY LEINSTER BAY Mary Creek CHANNEL Mo rk L UR YS CA n Francis Bay Trail al i Rata Cay B z Cru ay - i Virg ish Brit rries Coral Reef Nation s Virgin Island Threadneedle Point Pa DW S E s Fe Leinster Point Waterlemon Cay DRAKE a Tr W IN PA D AR G SA nd Isla Whistling Cay Anna Point T n y H or LOVANGO CAY P O IN FRANCIS SAB PA S MA R Y FU CON Carval Rock AY GO C SIR Virgin Islands SA GE UNITED KI NGDOM U N I T E D S TATE S y Ba THE z B TORTOLA St. John: Virgin Islands National Park and Coral Reef West Cr u West End F erry End ng G T REA N I S LA TCH THA S E A
St. Croix: Christiansted and Salt River Bay C A R I B B E A N S E A Buck Island Reef National Monument see map on pages 102-3 Salt River Bay National Historical Park and Ecological Preserve BUCK ISLAND O N G HAMS BLUFF MAR O ON Canebay Annaly Bay RID R Mt Eagle 1169ft 356m GE R Hams Bay Blue Mountain 1096ft 334m Butler Bay 73 Sa Ch lt 74 75 ST 70 63 70 Sandy Point St George Village Botanical Gardens Altona Lagoon Estate Whim ne Plantation terli Cen Museum Cruzan Rum Distillery 70 Golden University Grove of the Virgin Islands Henry E. Rohlsen Airport 64 Long Point 624 Ro Spring Bay Halfpenny Manchenil Bay Ferrall Bay Point Fareham Bay ond Point Hole Grass Point Robin Bay Great Pond at P Gr e Milord Point dB ay Isaac Bay Isaac Point East Point (Point Udall) Bay Surlaine Point Vagthus Point 66 Long Point Bay 60 62 Canegarden Bay Cottongarden Pt Boiler Bay Cramer Park LS G O AT HIL 62 CHRISTIANSTED 83 REFINERY Tague Point Romney TaguePointKnight Bay Bay Grapetree Turner Bay Hughes 62 OIL HAN N E L Pow Point 60 622 68 ND C SEVEN HILLS 82 733 d Roa ISLA 82 o H ar b CROIX 81 Estate Little La Grange Plantation Museum FREDERIKSTED n sted Protestant Cay 70 76 76 Fort Frederik Bay Beauregard r Bay ri s tia 763 72 BU C K Point Prune Bay Chenay Punnett Bay Visitor Center F Green Cay National Wildlife Refuge Pull 69 58 Westend Saltpond EE 75 63 Sandy Point National Wildlife Refuge Christiansted National Historic Site L Salt River Bay LON G RE EF North 0 0 C A R I B B E A N S E A Buck Island Reef National Monument was expanded by 18,135 acres from federal submerged lands by presidential proclamation in 2001. 2 Kilometers 1 2 Miles 1 Coral reef Mangrove Seagrass National Park System lands
Buck Island Reef: Underwater Trail C A R I B B E A N S E A WESTERN REEF Tra il Observation Point West Beach “G” BUCK il Tra Signal light 329ft 100m Pier s Ve se l a a ro pp ch m fro St “F” LAG Lagoon Entrance Channel North 0 B U C K Buck I s la n d Re e f Nati o na (s e e boun d a ry exte n t o n t he OON “H1” “H2” Diedrichs Point oix Cr Underwater Trail and Moorings ISLAND I S L A N D l Mon u St Croix m e nt map) 0 C H A N N E L Buck Island Reef National Monument was expanded by 18,135 acres from federal submerged lands by presidential proclamation in 2001. 0.5 Kilometer 0.1 0.5 0.1 Mile Coral reef Anchorage Picnic area Buoy Seagrass Scuba area Toilets Regulatory marker
Virgin Islands National Park National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Sea Turtles Sea Turtles: There are seven species of sea turtle in the world, three of which are seen in the Virgin Islands National Park; the green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas), hawksbill (Eretmochelys imbricata) and leatherback (Dermochelys coriacea). The loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta) is rare, with only one sighting in the VI National Park, but does nest infrequently on Buck Island, St. Croix. Sea turtles are reptiles that evolved from land turtles and made their way into the sea about 150 million years ago. Sea turtles spend most of their lives in the ocean, coming ashore, as adults, only to lay eggs, sun themselves (very rare) or as hatchlings leaving the nest. Turtles are migratory and may travel hundreds or thousands of miles between hatching, feeding, mating and nesting sites. Adapted for ocean life, sea turtles have flippers instead of feet. The muscular front flippers quickly propel the turtle through the water, while hind flippers act as rudders to steer the turtle. Sea turtles are fast swimmers and rely on their speed to avoid predators. Unlike land turtles, sea turtles cannot pull their head and flippers into their shell to avoid predation. Like other reptiles, sea turtles have lungs and breathe air. Sea turtles must swim to the surface in order to breathe. A turtle at rest may hold its breath for up to five hours while an active turtle needs to breath every 5-10 minutes. Sea turtles are ectothermic (cold blooded), meaning they do not use metabolism to control their body temperature. Instead, they absorb heat from their surroundings and have an internal body temperature the same as Green sea turtle feeding on turtle grass (Thalassia testudinum) in Leinster Bay, St. John. Photo by Caroline Rogers. their environment. Consequently, all sea turtles, except leatherbacks, are found in warm tropical and temperate waters. Leatherbacks have special adaptations that allow them to live in colder waters. Sea turtles are egg layers. Depending on the species, turtles may not start reproducing until they are 15 – 30 years old. The female must come ashore to dig a nest and lay her eggs. The tracks she makes while heading to and from the sea are called a turtle crawl. She digs a nest cavity using her rear flippers and deposits the eggs. Once she has deposited the eggs the female covers the nest with sand in an attempt to camouflage it and the eggs from predators. Each batch of eggs laid is called a clutch. Females lay between 4 and 11 clutches in a nesting season depending on the species. Typically the female will nest every 10 days. Each nest may contain between 80200 eggs depending on the species of turtle. Once a nest is laid the female returns to the sea. Sea turtles offer no maternal care to their young. Once laid the eggs develop in about 55 to 70 days depending on the temperature of the sand. Hotter nests produce females while cooler nests produce males. After the eggs hatch, the baby turtles, called hatchlings, make their way to the surface as a group and emerge from the nest together. The hatchlings then crawl across the sand and head to the sea where they must survive on their own. Hatchlings spend their early years offshore, drifting with the ocean’s currents while floating on algal mats. The turtles return after a couple of years as juveniles, where they feed in near shore waters until they are mature and ready to reproduce. Green Sea Turtle (Chelonia mydas) Hawksbill Sea Turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) Description: ••Oval or heart shaped body with slightly scalloped edge of carapace. Scutes do not overlap ••Adults may reach 4.5 ft in length and weigh up to 500 lbs ••Color: Brownish gray to green with lighter striations ••Named for the green color of their fat acquired by a diet of marine plants Diet: ••Carnivorous when young, feeding on fish eggs, small invertebrates and mollusks ••Predominantly herbivorous as adults, feeding mostly on seagrass Distribution: ••Throughout the world in tropical to temperate waters ••Often seen feeding in shallow nearshore waters ••Most common turtle in Virgin Islands’ waters Nesting: ••Peak nesting season in the Virgin Islands, August-October ••Lay between 100-140 eggs per nest ••Nest approximately every two weeks, laying between 2-6 nests per nesting season ••Typically nest every 2-3 years ••Nest mid-beach on sandy beaches Description: ••Oval shaped shell with serrated margin. Scutes (scales) overlap like tiles on a roof ••Adults may reach 3 ft in length and weigh up to 200 lbs ••Color: brown, gold and mahogany striations ••Get their name from the hawk-like shape of their beak Diet: ••Use their hawk-like beak to scrape sponges and invertebrates from the reefs Distribution: ••Throughout the world in tropical and sub-tropical waters ••Feeds on shallowand deep coral reefs Nesting: ••Peak nesting season in the Virgin Islands, July-November ••Lay between 120-160 eggs per nest
National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Virgin Islands National Park National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Virgin Islands National Park National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Virgin Islands National Park National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Virgin Islands National Park
From Name: Address: Caneel Bay Date: Frank Bay Salt Pond Enighed Pond Chocolate Hole Salt Ponds Virgin Islands National Park Birds of St. John, U.S.V.I. Hawksnest Bay Inhabited Areas Coral Bay Salt Pond Bay Salt Pond LEGEND Habitat in which the bird is most likely to be found: ( OS ) Ocean/Shoreline ( IA ) Inhabited Areas ( DF ) Dry Forest ( MF ) Moist Forest ( SP ) Salt Pond ( M ) Mangroves Brown Bay Salt Pond Hurricane Hole Dry Forest Leinster Bay Salt Pond Virgin Islands National Park 1300 Cruz Bay Creek St. John U.S.V.I. 00830 Annaberg Salt Ponds Mandal Salt Pond Lameshur Bay Salt Ponds Please staple closed Maho Bay Reef Bay Salt Ponds Europa Bay Salt Pond Salt Pond Compiled by L. Brannick & Dr. D. Catanzaro Revised 2002 The island of St. John is located on the eastern end of the Greater Antilles at 18 degrees North latitude and 64 degrees West longitude. St. John is 9 miles in length and 5 miles at its widest point. Virgin Islands National Park protects large tracts of natural habitat in which approximately 144 species of birds can be seen throughout the year. This checklist has recently been updated based on the observations and records of Park staff, the local Audubon Society and the V.I .Division of Fish & Wildlife. A few new species have been added to this revised list, while others that have long gone unreported have been dropped. Please help us in keeping accurate records, by mailing this list with your recorded observations to the park. Species taxonomy and nomenclature follow the A. O. U. ( 1998, 7th edition ) and supplements checklist. The birds are listed by their common names with their scientific names in parenthesis. Solid lines separate families Francis Bay Salt Pond Cinnamon Bay Fish Bay Salt Pond Moist Forest Status : ( A ) Abundant - A frequently encountered species ( C ) Common - likely to be seen in suitable habitat ( U )Uncommon- Present but not always seen ( O ) Occasional - May not be present every year ( R ) Rare Seldom seen ( * ) Not Reported Newfound Bay Salt Pond Haulover Bay Postage required Southside Salt Pond Concordia Fresh Pond N Mangrove s Original vegetation map was provided by: The University of the Virgin Islands. 2000. Conservation Data Center, Rapid Ecological Assessment. St. Thomas, VI USA National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Breeding Status: ( B ) Breeds in the Virgin Islands ( N ) Non-Breeder ( P ) Probable Breeder Season : ( W ) Winter Dec.-Feb. ( S ) Summer June-Aug. ( s ) Spring Mar.-May ( F ) Fall Sept.-Nov. Plovers Black-bellied Plover ( Pluvialis squatorla ) American Golden-Plover ( P. dominica ) Wilson’s Plover ( Charadruis wilsonia ) Semipalmated Plover ( C. semipalmtus ) Killdeer ( C. vociferus ) Oystercatchers American Oystercatcher ( Haematopus palliatus ) Stilts Black-necked Stilt ( Himantopus mexicanus ) Turnstones, Snipes and Sandpipers Greater Yellowlegs ( Tringa melanoleuca ) Lesser Yellowlegs ( T. flavipes ) Solitary Sandpiper ( T. solitaria ) Spotted Sandpiper ( Actitis macularia ) Whimbrel ( Numenius phaeopus ) Ruddy Turnstone ( Arenaria interpres ) Red Knot ( Calidris canutus ) Sanderling ( C. alba ) Semipalmated Sandpiper ( C. pusilla ) Western Sandpiper ( C. mauri ) Least Sandpiper ( C. minutilla ) White-rumped Sandpiper ( C. fuscicollis ) Pectoral Sandpiper ( C. melanotos ) Dunlin ( C. alpina ) Stilt Sandpiper ( C. himantopus ) Short-billed Dowitcher ( Limnodromus griseus ) Wilson’s Snipe ( Gallinago delicata ) Gulls,Terns and Jaegers Pomarine Jaeger ( Stercorarius pomarinus ) Laughing Gull ( Larus atricilla ) Ring-billed Gull ( L. delawarensis ) Gull-billed Tern ( Sterna nilotica ) Royal Tern ( S. maxima ) Sandwich Tern ( S. sandvicensis ) Roseate Tern ( S. dougallii ) Common Tern ( S. hirundo ) Least Tern ( S. antillarum ) Bridled Tern ( S. anaethetus ) Sooty Tern ( S. fuscata ) Brown Noddy ( Anous stolidus ) Pigeons and Doves Rock Dove ( Columba livia ) Scaly-naped Pigeon ( C. squamosa ) White-crowned Pigeon ( C. leucocphala ) White-winged Dove ( Zenaida asiatica ) Zenaida Dove ( Z. aurita ) Common Ground-Dove N SP N IA B SP N SP B IA O* * O * * * R CCCC CC* C UUR U B OS U U U U B SP CCCC N SP N SP N SP N SP N SP N SP N SP N OS N SP N SP N SP N SP N IA N OS N SP OR * O CC* C * O* O CCR C * * * R OOR O R R R R R R * R OOR O OO* O OOR O * O* O * * * R R * * * OR * O N SP N IA OR R O R R * R N OS B OS N OS P M B OS B OS B OS N OS B OS B OS B OS B OS R * * * * A A A R * * * * * R * CCR C * R UR * UCU R R R R * UUU * UU* * UU* * UUR B IA R R R R B MF C C C C B M UUUU P IA U U U U B IA A A A A ( Columbina passerina ) B IA A A A A Bridled Quail-Dove ( G. mystacea ) B MF U U U U Ruddy Quail-Dove ( Geotrygon montana ) P MF R R R R Cuckoos and Anis Yellow-billed Cuckoo ( Coccyzus americanus ) N ML O O * O B DF U U U U Mangrove Cockoo ( C. minor ) Smooth-billed Ani ( Crotophaga ani ) B DF U U U U W s S F N IA * R * R B IA * R U R ( Caprimulgus carolinensis ) N MF R R * R Hu
VIRGIN ISLANDS NATIONAL PARK NATIONAL PARK SERVICE u.s. DEPARTMENT OF INTERIOR BIRDS OF ST. JOHN, USVI CHECKLIST PHOTO COMPANION GUIDE PREPARED BY CARRIE STENGEL PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE NATIONAL AUDOBON SOCIETY & WIKIPEDIA. PHOTOS PROTECTED UNDER COPYRIGHT LAW. FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY. LEAST GREBE ( R) AUDUBON’S SHEARWATER ( R) PIED-BILLED GREBE ( UC) RED-BILLED TROPICBIRD ( UC) WHITE-TAILED TROPICBIRD ( UC) MASKED BOOBY ( R) RED-FOOTED BOOBY ( VR) BROWN BOOBY ( C) BROWN PELICAN ( C) MAGNIFICENT FRIGATEBIRD ( C) DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT ( UC) SNOWY EGRET ( C) GREAT EGRET ( C) AMERICAN BITTERN ( R) GREAT BLUE HERON ( C) TRICOLORED HERON ( R) IMMATURE LITTLE BLUE HERON CATTLE EGRET ( C) LITTLE BLUE HERON ( C) GREEN HERON ( C) BLACK CROWNED NIGHT HERON ( R) YELLOW CROWNED NIGHT HERON ( C) AMERICAN WIGEON (VR) WHITE-CHEEKED PINTAIL ( C) RING-NECKED DUCK ( UC) BLUE-WINGED TEAL ( C) NORTHERN PINTAIL (VR) NORTHERN SHOVELER (UC) GREEN-WINGED TEAL ( R) LESSER SCAUP ( R) OSPREY ( UC) NORTHERN HARRIER ( VR) AMERICAN KESTREL ( C) SHARP-SHINNED HAWK ( VR) RED-TAILED HAWK ( C) PEREGRINE FALCON ( C) MERLIN ( UC) CLAPPER RAIL (VR) BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER ( UC) SEMIPALMATED PLOVER ( C) SORA ( C) COMMON MOORHEN ( C) AMERICAN GOLDEN PLOVER (VR) KILLDEER ( UC) AMERICAN COOT ( O) WILSON’S PLOVER ( C) AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER ( C) BLACK-NECKED STILT ( C) GREATER YELLOWLEGS ( UC) WHIMBREL (VR) LESSER YELLOWLEGS ( C) RUDDY TURNSTONE ( UC) SOLITARY SANDPIPER ( UC) RED KNOT (VR) SPOTTED SANDPIPER ( C) SANDERLING (VR) SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER ( C)0 WESTERN SANDPIPER ( C) LEAST SANDPIPER ( C) DUNLIN ( R) WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER (UC) STILT SANDPIPER ( UC) LONG-BILLED DOWITCHER ( R) WILSON’S SNIPE ( R) PECTORAL SANDPIPER ( R) SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER ( UC) LAUGHING GULL ( C ) POMARINE JAEGER ( R) RING-BILLED GULL ( R) ROYAL TERN (C) GULL-BILLED TERN ( R) SANDWICH TERN LEAST TERN ( UC) COMMON TERN ( UC) ROSEATE TERN ( UC) BRIDLED TERN ( UC) SOOTY TERN ( UC) COMMON BLACK-HEADED GULL ( VR) BROWN NODDY ( UC) ROCK DOVE ( UC) SCALY-NAPED PIGEON ( C) WHITE-CROWNED PIGEON ( R) COMMON GROUND DOVE ( C) WHITE-WINGED DOVE ( UC) ZENAIDA DOVE ( C) BRIDLED QUAIL-DOVE ( UC) RUDDY QUAIL-DOVE ( UC) YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO ( R) COMMON NIGHTHAWK ( UC) GREEN-THROATED CARIB HUMMINGBIRD ( C) MANGROVE CUCKOO ( UC) ANTILLEAN NIGHTHAWK ( UC) ANTILLEAN CRESTED HUMMINGBIRD ( C) SMOOTH-BILLED ANI ( R) CHUCK WILL’S WIDOW ( UC) BELTED KINGFISHER ( C) GRAY KINGBIRD ( C) YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER ( UC) PUERTO RICAN FLYCATCHER ( UC) CARIBBEAN ELAENIA ( C) YELLOW-THROATED VIREO ( UC) WHITE-EYED VIREO ( UC) BLACK-WHISKERED VIREO ( C) BANK SWALLOW ( UC) CLIFF SWALLOW ( R) CARIBBEAN MARTIN ( UC) BARN SWALLOW UC) NORTHERN MOCKINGBIRD ( C) PEARLY-EYED THRASHER ( C) BLUE-WINGED WARBLER ( R) GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLER ( R) YELLOW WARBLER ( C) CHESNUT SIDED WARBLER ( R) CAPE MAY WARBLER ( UC) BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER ( UC) NORTHERN PARULA (C) MAGNOLIA WARBLER ( R) YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER ( UC) YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER ( R) BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLER ( R) BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER ( UC) PALM WARBLER ( UC) BLACKPOLL WARBLER ( C) PRAIRIE WARBLER ( UC) BLACK & WHITE WARBLER ( C) AMERICAN REDSTART ( C) PROTHONOTARY WARBLER ( UC) OVENBIRD ( R) WORM-EATING WARBLER ( R) LOUISIANA WATERTHRUSH ( UC) NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH ( C) KENTUCKY WARBLER ( R) COMMON YELLOWTHROAT ( R) SCARLET TANANGER ( R) HOODED WARBLER ( UC) BANANAQUIT ( C) BLACK-FACED GRASSQUIT ( C) BLUE GROSBEAK (UC) LESSER ANTILLEAN BULLFINCH ( C) ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK ( R) BOBOLINK ( R) INDIGO BUNTING ( UC) BALTIMORE ORIOLE (MALE & FEMALE) ( R) TROUPIAL ( R) HOUSE SPARROW ( C)
Seashore Trees Mangrove Rhizophora mangle Black, white and red mangroves are common species along our tropical shores. The red shown here, extends shorelines or creates islands with it's arching stilt roots. Fruit Trees Sugar Apple Annona squamosa A small deciduous tree attaining 10-20 ft. in height with irregular spreading branches. Well known for its sweet edible fruit, resembling hand grenades in appearance. This familiar shoreline tree is easy to identify by its large round leathery leaves. It bears clusters of green, ripening to purple, fruits that are edible. Maho* Virgin Islands National Park Common Trees of Virgin Islands National Park Ginger Thomas* Seagrape Cocoloba uvifera National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Mango* Tecoma stans Mangifera indica An excellent hardy shade tree with lance shaped leaves and bearing one of the finest tropical fruits. One of many introduced species. Its sap may cause dermatitis. Thespesia populnea This coastal tree, for which Maho Bay was named, is characterized by large bell-shaped flowers that turn from pale yellow to purple. It has heart shaped leaves and green seed pods that turn brown. Manchineel Hippomane mancine/la This is a very poisonous tree with shiny , small oval leaves. It can grow to 40 ft. in height, and bears small crabapplesized fruits that are highly toxic. The tree's white sap is also very harmful. Genip* Melicoccus bijugatus This large deciduous tree has gray blotchy bark and dark green leaves . The clustered edible fruits are quarter sized with green leathery skin, a single large seed and tart pulpy fruit. Some common trees within the Park are nonnative or naturalized (exotic*), and may be displacing native (indigenous) flora and fauna . Virgin Islands National Park is implementing a management program to control the invasive exotics, in order to protect the native trees. Ginger Thomas (also yellow cedar or yellow elder) is a nonnative tree or shrub, that produces the official flower of the US Virgin Islands. It is found along roadsides with bright yellow, trumpet shaped flowers, and long, narrow seed pods. Ginger Thomas usually blooms during extended rainy periods. Flamboyant * This is a guide to the most commonly found trees in Virgin Islands National Park The majority of these trees can be seen at popular sitesinthepark suchasTrunkBay, Annaberg, or alonghiking trails. The Park is home to over 400 tree species. Many of these have several names due to the complex cultural heritage of the island. Pimenta racemosa Also: Royal Poinciana A large tree with 2 foot long "feathery" leaves and a brilliant spreading crown ofbloodorange flowers, blooming twice a year. Its long woody "shak shak" seed pods used in calypso and local scratchband music. A smooth barked tree with dark green, shiny fragrant leaves. The leaves are used medicinally and the oil from the leaves for aftershave. Easily seen around the Cinnamon Bay ruins, it is still locally used for cooking, however it should not be confused with the more widely used laurel bay leaf. Teyer Palm Coccothrinax a/ta The only remaining native palm. Used in traditional basketry, fish traps, ' brooms and roof thatching. These trees prefer moist habitats and grow with tall slender trunks. iilili~l'll~~ Bay Rum Delonix regia Gumbo Limbo Frangipani Bursera Simaruba Plumeria alba Also: Turpentine or Tourist Tree. Identify this dry forest tree by its peeling red bark (or skin!). The leaves and sap smell like turpentine and have many medicinal properties. This attractive native tree with milky sap, is easily distinguished by its Jong narrow lance-shaped leaves and clusters of fragrant waxy, white flowers. It grows in dry areas, and is often deleafed by a moth caterpillar. Calabash Crescentia cujete A distinctive tree with leaves growing directly off the main branches. The fruit can grow to basketball size, and when dried , used as gourds, rattles or ornamental bowls. Lignum Vitae Tamarind* Guaiacum officinale Tamarindus indica A slow growing evergreen with small orange seedpods It blooms twice a year with pale blue flowers . It has an extremely dense wood that will sink in water and was used for ball bearings. Large trees with feathery ' leaves are often found in roadways and trails. They bear pulpy bean shaped seed pods. The fruit is used to make can-dies, juices or eaten raw. It is a tasty ingredient in Worcester-shire sauce. Noni I starvation fruit Marinda citrifolia Also: Painkiller plant It can be seen at the entrance to Trunk Bay. Iden. tifiable by large, oval leaves ~ and irregularly shaped, whitish fruit, palatable to animals and birds only, also ._'2~·~•used in modern, alternative medicine . Kapok* Ceiba pentandra Also: Silk Cotton Tree. Can be found on the Reef bay trail with huge buttressing roots. Its seed pods release fluffy silky material used for stuffing mattress cushions and life jackets. Indigenous people carved canoes and drums from t
diversity Review A Unique Coral Community in the Mangroves of Hurricane Hole, St. John, US Virgin Islands Caroline S. Rogers ID Wetland and Aquatic Research Center, US Geological Survey, St. John, VI 00830, USA; caroline_rogers@usgs.gov; Tel.: +1-340-693-8950 Received: 9 June 2017; Accepted: 1 August 2017; Published: 4 August 2017 Abstract: Corals do not typically thrive in mangrove environments. However, corals are growing on and near the prop roots of red mangrove trees in Hurricane Hole, an area within the Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument under the protection of the US National Park Service in St. John, US Virgin Islands. This review summarizes current knowledge of the remarkable biodiversity of this area. Over 30 scleractinian coral species, about the same number as documented to date from nearby coral reefs, grow here. No other mangrove ecosystems in the Caribbean are known to have so many coral species. This area may be a refuge from changing climate, as these corals weathered the severe thermal stress and subsequent disease outbreak that caused major coral loss on the island’s coral reefs in 2005 and 2006. Shading by the red mangrove trees reduces the stress that leads to coral bleaching. Seawater temperatures in these mangroves are more variable than those on the reefs, and some studies have shown that this variability results in corals with a greater resistance to higher temperatures. The diversity of sponges and fish is also high, and a new genus of serpulid worm was recently described. Continuing research may lead to the discovery of more new species. Keywords: corals; mangroves; climate change refuge; thermal stress; US Virgin Islands 1. Introduction For hundreds of years, four bays within Hurricane Hole, St. John, US Virgin Islands, have been a refuge for boats during major storms (Figure 1). Hurricane Hole is a beautiful seascape with coral reefs, mangroves, seagrass beds and a remarkable biodiversity in corals, fishes, sponges and other organisms. This area is part of the Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument established in 2001 by President Clinton through a Presidential Proclamation The particular biological and physical oceanographic conditions within these four mangrove-lined bays within Hurricane Hole (which range in size from 0.06 to 0.11 km2 ) appear to be providing a refuge for corals at a time of changing climate [1], (Figure 2). Corals and the reefs they create are at risk from numerous human activities around the world [2]. Corals do not usually thrive among mangroves because of the typically turbid and low (and sometimes high) salinity waters. Here in Hurricane Hole there are no permanent streams entering the bays, with the only freshwater coming from rainfall and possibly from groundwater. The mangroves provide shade, attenuating more than 70% of the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) [1]. In addition, the proximity of seagrass beds, mangroves, and patch reefs, and the particular hydrographic conditions and biological influences of these habitats on seawater chemistry, generate chemical conditions that buffer against lower pH (ocean acidification). Ocean acidification reduces the rates at which calcifiers such as corals and coralline algae grow and causes carbonate sediment dissolution [3]. Diversity 2017, 9, 29; doi:10.3390/d9030029 www.mdpi.com/journal/diversity Diversity 2017, 9, 29 2 of 16 Diversity 2017, 9, 29 Diversity 2017, 9, 29 2 of 16 2 of 16 Figure 1. 1.Location of St. John, US Virgin Islands, Islands, and andthe themangrove-lined mangrove-lined bays Hurricane Hole, Figure bays in in Hurricane Hole, Figure 1. Location Location of of St. St.John, John,US USVirgin Virgin Islands, and the mangrove-lined bays in Hurricane Hole, within Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument. within Virgin Virgin Islands within IslandsCoral CoralReef ReefNational NationalMonument. Monument. (a) (b) (a) (b) Figure 2. Cont. Diversity 2017, 9, 29 3 of 16 Diversity 2017, 9, 29 3 of 16 (c) (d) Figure 2. Red Mangroves fringe the shorelines of the bays in Hurricane Hole and their prop roots Figure 2. Red Mangroves fringe the shorelines of the bays in Hurricane Hole and their prop roots extend into the clear waters below (a,b). Corals grow on and among the prop roots and on nearby extend into the clear waters below (a,b). Corals grow on and among the prop roots and on nearby hard hard substrata (c,d). All photos in this article were taken by the author. substrata (c,d). All photos in this article were taken by the author. When the Virgin Islands Coral Reef Monument was first established by President Clinton, the When Islands Coral Reef Monument was first established Clinton, significance ofthe theVirgin mangroves in Hurricane Hole, particularly their rolebyasPresident a nursery, was the significance of the mangroves in Hurricane Hole, particularly their role as a nursery, was highlighted highlighted (see text box). However, it was not until 2009 that the
National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Virgin Islands National Park Manchineel or Death Apple (extremely toxic) Found near and on coastal beaches, has shiny heartshaped leaves with yellow veins. Ingestion of the small green applelike fruit can cause Death! Symptoms: Severe burning and blistering of the skin, temporary blindness. Remedy: Wash with soap and water; if severe reaction, seek medical treatment. Enjoy the Beautiful Trails of Virgin Islands National Park “Look But Don’t Touch!” Help us protect park resources include: O Remove all trash when you leave. O Campfires are prohibited. O Pets off leash or on beaches are prohibited. O Do not collect or rocks. For your Safety O Do not leave valuables unattended. O Always wear reef safe sunscreen. O Vehicles parked on roadway will be ticketed/towed. O Do not eat any fruits or berries. Respect Others O No smoking on beaches. O Loud music is prohibited. O Nudity is prohibited Plants to Avoid while Hiking Virgin Islands National Park offers a variety of hiking adventures for the entire family and for all skill and ability levels. This brochure, which describes plants to be avoided while hiking as well as precautions and remedies should you come in contact with any of them, will help you know your surroundings for a safe and enjoyable trail time. Should you wish to learn more, a simple Internet search will provide a wealth of information. Christmas Bush A small shrub that is found in open canopies and along trails. It has dark green leaves that can have a reddish hue. It resembles holly. Symptoms: Burning, itching skin, swelling, irritation and rash that can last up to several weeks. Remedy: Possible use of anti-itch creams or ointments. Stinging Nettle A twining vine that has stinging nettle hairs. Typically found in disturbed areas, along trails and in moist forests. Symptoms: Instant pain and burning, rash and sometimes blisters. Remedy: Possible use of anti-itch creams or ointments. National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Virgin Islands National Park 1300 Cruz Bay Creek St. John, USVI 00830 (340) 776-6201 ext. 238 In case of EMERGENCY DIAL 911 From Cell Phone DIAL (340) 776-9110 Plants to Avoid Casha Tree Found in drier areas along the coastline, Pinguin or False Pineapple Introduced to the adjacent to trails or on hillsides. These common trees can reach heights of 30 feet and have dozens of spines along the branches. Symptoms: Deep puncture wounds, redness, painful swelling, localized pain and infection. Remedy: If infection develops seek medical attention. Virgin Islands during the plantation era to serve as a natural fence line. It forms dense and impenetrable patches and thickets and has long, slender, bright green leaves with spiny edges and tips. Typically found adjacent to ruins or historic structures and along open trails. Symptoms: Scratches, cuts and shallow puncture wounds. Remedy: Wash wounds, apply antibiotic ointment or cream. Jump-Up-Cactus or Prickly Pear Common in dry forests, is covered by dozens of long, sharp, barbed spines and grows in dense lowgrowing clumps. Spines easily penetrate clothing and can become imbedded in skin. Symptoms: Localized pain, inflammation, irritation and rash. Remedy: Remove spines carefully to alleviate pain. Catch & Keep A common weed that forms dense thickets of vine-like vegetation. It is found throughout the island. Covered in hundreds of hooked spines, catch and keep is aptly named for its ability to hook into and hold anything. Symptoms: Barbed spines can penetrate skin causing dozens of cuts, irritation, redness, swelling and infection. Remedy: Wash wounds, apply antibiotic ointment or cream. Jimson Weed, Prickly Burr or Deadly Nightshade (extremely toxic) These herbaceous, poisonous plants are found along roadsides and disturbed areas. Distinguished by their umbrella-shaped flowers and round prickly seed capsules they can grow to a height of five feet, preferring to grow in full sunlight. Symptoms: Delirium, increased heart rate, rapid breathing, amnesia and even Death! Remedy: Seek immediate medical attention. Jumbie Bean, Crab's Eye or Rosary (extremely toxic) A slender vine commonly found in moist, welldrained wooded areas, adjacent to clearings or disturbed areas and along roadsides. The bright red seeds have been used to make jewelry and percussion instruments. Symptoms: Nausea, vomiting, convulsions, liver failure, death. Remedy: If ingested seek medical attention immediately. Pencil Euphorbia or Milk Bush (extremely toxic) A small shrub-like tree used as an ornamental plant. Distinguished by hundreds of bright green pencil-thin cylindrical branches, it secretes a milky sap when cut or damaged. Symptoms: Skin irritation, severe rash and blisters, blindness if it gets in the eyes. Remedy: Wash affected area immediately with soap and water. Seek immediate medical attention for eye or mouth exposure. To prevent contact with hazardous plants, please stay
National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Enjoy the Beautiful Waters of the Virgin Islands National Park Corals Are actually living animals, contact can cause severe damage to the coral and injury or infection to you. Prevention: Always stay a safe distance from the reef, do not kick or step on corals while snorkeling, stand only in sand. Symptoms: Cuts and abrasions. Remedy: Clean wound thoroughly. “Look But Don’t Touch!” Help us protect park resources include: O Remove all trash when you leave. O Do not feed fish or wildlife. O Campfires are prohibited. O Pets off leash or on beaches are prohibited. O Do not collect shells or rocks. O Do not touch or stand not on coral or rocks For your Safety O Do not leave valuables unattended. O No surfing or skim boarding in designated swim areas. O Always wear reef safe sunscreen. O Body surfing is not advised. O Vehicles parked on roadway will be ticketed/towed. Respect Others O No smoking on beaches. O No glass on Beach--cut feet spoil vacations. O Loud music is prohibited. O Nudity is prohibited. National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Virgin Islands National Park & Coral Reef National Monument 1300 Cruz Bay Creek St. John, USVI 00830 (340) 776-6201 ext. 238 In case of EMERGENCY DIAL 911 From Cell Phone DIAL (340) 776-9110 To report a Lionfish sighting call (340) 201-2342 Virgin Islands National Park Things to Avoid While in the Water. Virgin Islands National Park and Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument offer wonderful underwater adventures. This brochure describes some common hazards, as well as precautions and remedies should you come in contact with one of these creatures or plants. Should you wish to learn more, a simple Internet search will provide a wealth of information. Lionfish Have Poisonous venom tipped spines. Prevention: Do not approach. Symptoms: Swelling, and intense pain. If systemic allergic reaction occurs seek immediate medical attention. Remedy: Soak area in hot water and seek medical attention. Jellyfish & Sea Wasps Not often found in waters here. Avoidance is the best practice. Soft gelatinous bodies with long stinging tentacles that discharge when touched. Symptoms: Mild stinging, itching and redness to severe allergic reaction and anaphylactic shock. Remedy: Tentacles must be removed from skin or will continue to fire. Bare hands should not be used to remove tentacles. Vinegar may relieve the pain. Hazardous Marine Life & Things to Avoid Scorpionfish Fire Coral Fire/Bristle Worm Excellent camouflage helps them blend into seagrass, coral reef and rocky habitats. Venomous spines line the dorsal, anal and pectoral fins. Prevention: Shuffle feet when entering the water and not touching the sea floor may prevent injury from a Scorpionfish. Symptoms: Swelling, intense pain. Seek immediate medical attention if allergic reaction occurs. Remedy: Soaking in hot water may alleviate the pain. Have strong stinging cells and are either blade-like (shown) or encrusting (flat), and are mustard-yellow to dark orange, often with white edges. Prevention: Do not touch any corals. Symptoms: Painful burning sensation, rash, redness, tingling, itching, welts and allergic reactions. Remedy: Rubbing alcohol or meat tenderizer may help alleviate the pain. Commonly found in sea grass, on or under boulders, and coral. Thousands of fine venom-filled, needlelike bristles can break off and become embedded in the skin. Prevention: Do not touch marine life. Symptoms: Pain, burning, itching and redness. Remedy: Bristles may be removed by using adhesive tape. Ammonia may help relieve pain. Sharks Touch-me-not sponges Hydroids Resemble a feather plant, related to jellyfish and corals, and have strong stinging cells. Find them attached to rocks and plants, particularly mangrove roots, on docks, buoys and mooring lines. Prevention: Be aware of your surroundings and do not touch marine life. Symptoms: Burning, itching, inflammation, swelling and pain. Sunburn and hot water may increase the symptoms. Remedy: Rinse with vinegar. If allergic reaction occurs seek immediate medical attention. Brown or orange, they have fiberglass like spines which contain toxin that imbed in the skin if touched. Prevention: Do not touch any marine life. Symptoms: Burning, itching, swelling and redness. Remedy: Spicules may be removed with adhesive tape. Vinegar may help relieve the burning sensation. Shark attacks are extremely rare in the Virgin Islands. Prevention: Avoid waters being fished or where fish are being cleaned. Do not swim at night or at dusk and dawn. Remove shiny jewelry and do not enter the water if you are bleeding. Move out of the area or exit the water if a shark approaches too close, makes sudden movements or appears agitated. Remedy: Seek medical care immediately if bitten. Long-spined sea urchins Eels Usually found in rock piles, under coral ledges and in caves. Eels are not aggressive by nature but can attack if provoked

also available

National Parks
USFS NW
Alaska
Arizona
California
Colorado
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Minnesota
Montana
Nevada
New Mexico
North Carolina
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Texas
Utah
Virginia
Washington
Wyoming
Lake Tahoe - COMING SOON! 🎈
Yellowstone
Yosemite