New River Gorge

National Park & Preserve - West Virginia

The New River Gorge National Park & Preserve protects the New River Gorge in southern West Virginia. The area stretches for 53 miles (85 km) from just downstream of Hinton to Hawks Nest State Park near Ansted. New River Gorge is also home to some of the country's best whitewater rafting. The focus of this rafting is in the New River Gorge from the Cunard put-in to the Fayette Station take-out.

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Official Visitor Map of New River Gorge National Park & Preserve (NP & PRES) in West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).New River Gorge - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of New River Gorge National Park & Preserve (NP & PRES) in West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/neri/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_River_Gorge_National_Park_and_Preserve The New River Gorge National Park & Preserve protects the New River Gorge in southern West Virginia. The area stretches for 53 miles (85 km) from just downstream of Hinton to Hawks Nest State Park near Ansted. New River Gorge is also home to some of the country's best whitewater rafting. The focus of this rafting is in the New River Gorge from the Cunard put-in to the Fayette Station take-out. A rugged, whitewater river flowing northward through deep canyons, the New River is among the oldest rivers on the continent. The park encompasses over 70,000 acres of land along the New River, is rich in cultural and natural history, and offers an abundance of scenic and recreational opportunities. To reach Park Headquarters take Route 19 North from Beckley to the Glen Jean exit. Upon exiting Rt 19, make an immediate left turn. At the next intersection, turn right. Park Headquarters will be straight ahead on the right. GPS Coordinates for Headquarters: 81.15587W, 37.92775N PLEASE NOTE: Third party search and map apps may direct you to an potentially inaccessible area of the park with no amenities or rangers stations. Please refer to the Visitor Center or Park Headquarters addresses for directions. Canyon Rim Visitor Center Canyon Rim Visitor Center is one of the park's primary, year round visitor centers. It is located at the New River Gorge Bridge, just north of Fayetteville. A wooden boardwalk provides scenic views of the New River Gorge Bridge and the gorge. There are no hiking trails that start at the visitor center. The center features exhibits, information, park film, and a book store. Canyon Rim Visitor Center is located on U.S. Route 19, just north of Fayetteville, WV. U.S. Route 19 is easily reached from Interstates I-64 and I-79, as well as U.S. Route 60. GPS Coordinates: 38.07003 N, 81.07583 W Grandview Visitor Center The Grandview Visitor Center is one of our seasonal visitor centers, typically open from Memorial Day to Labor Day. Here there are overlooks of the New River, five hiking trails, ranger-led walks and talks, summer outdoor dramas, and picnic areas with playgrounds. To reach Grandview from Beckley follow I-64 East five miles to Exit 129 B. From Lewisburg follow I-64 West forty miles to Exit 129. From either exit, turn right and follow Route 9 North six miles to Grandview. Sandstone Visitor Center Sandstone Visitor Center is one of the primary visitor centers for New River Gorge National Park and Preserve. It is a green design building where visitors can learn about the park and the watershed through exhibits and a park film. The center also features a native plant garden, picnic areas, and book store. Thurmond Depot Visitor Center Thurmond Depot is a restored railroad depot located in the historic railroad town of Thurmond. Open seasonally (typically Memorial Day to Labor Day), the Depot is an information center and a park store. Take U.S. Route 19 to the Glen Jean exit, north of Beckley. Follow the signs to Thurmond, seven miles down WV Route 25 (Route 25 is a narrow, winding road and is not recommended for RVs and trailers). No automotive services are available in Thurmond. Army Camp This campground offers both tent and RV campsites along the banks of the New River at one of its many horseshoe bends. There are 11 drive-in sites for RVs, campers, and tents. Only small (less than 25 feet) and medium (22 - 31.5 feet) RVs or campers are recommended. Large RVs or campers are not recommended. Some sites offer partial shade; others are located in the open with no shade. Camp only at designated sites. RV, camper, or car camping in non-designated sites is strictly prohibited. Army Camp 0.00 These primitive camping areas have no drinking water or hookups, and limited restroom facilities. All sites are managed on a first-come, first-served basis and reservations are not accepted. There are no fees for camping. Army Camp Campground A grassy field with a few trees, campsites, and restroom facility in it The campground at Army Camp offers 11 drive in sites around a grassy field on the banks of the New River. Standard Campsite at Army Camp A sunny campsite in a grassy area with a picnic table and grill Campsites at Army Camp each offer a camping pad, picnic table, and places for grilling and campfires. Partially Shaded Army Camp Campsite A grassy field campsite with a picnic table and grill partially shaded by a few trees. Some campsites at Army Camp offer partial shade. New River at Army Camp A sandy beach at a clear fast flowing river next to a green tree covered bank The swift water New River at Army Camp offers fishing and relaxation opportunities near your campsite. Army Camp Picnic Area Three picnic tables in a shaded forested area. Day use picnic tables at Army Camp allow visitors to enjoy a meal near the New River. Brooklyn Campground This tent only campground is located on the banks of the New River near the Cunard River Access point and Southside Trailhead. It offers 4 walk-in tents sites and 1 tent-only drive-in site. There are no drive-in sites for RVs or campers at this location. RV, camper, or car camping is prohibited. Brooklyn Campground 0.00 These primitive camping areas have no drinking water or hookups, and limited restroom facilities. All sites are managed on a first-come, first-served basis and reservations are not accepted. There are no fees for camping. Brooklyn Campground campers sitting in front of tent Campers at Brooklyn Campground Burnwood Group Campsite Burnwood is located across Route 19 from Canyon Rim Visitor Center and offers group camping. This site requires a Special Use Permit. For a permit for the group campsites, contact the permits office at 304-465-6517. Permits require a minimum of 10 business days after the application has been received. Burnwood Group Campsite 75.00 To reserve the campsite at Burnwood call (304) 465-6517. Burnwood Groups Site firepit and camp site fire pit at Burnwood Group Campground Burnwood Shelter octagonal picnic shelter Picnic shelter at Burnwood Glade Creek Campground This forested campground offers both tent and RV sites near the banks of the New River and the Glade Creek Trailhead. There are 6 walk-in tents sites and 5 drive-in sites for tents, RVs, or campers. There is 1 accessible site. Only small (less than 25 feet) and medium (22 - 31.5 feet) RVs or campers are recommended. Camp only at designated sites. RV, camper, or car camping in non-designated sites, walk-in sites, or any parking area is strictly prohibited. Glade Creek Campground 0.00 These primitive camping areas have no drinking water or hookups, and limited restroom facilities. All sites are managed on a first-come, first-served basis and reservations are not accepted. There are no fees for camping. Glade Creek Campground campsite Campsite at Glade Creek campground Glade Creek Campground campsite Campsite at Glade Creek Campground Glade Creek Campground walk in camping area Walk in camping area at Glade Creek Campground Glade Creek Campground campsite Campsite at Glade Creek Campground Glade Creek Campground restrooms Restrooms at Glade Creek campground Grandview Sandbar This campground offers shaded wooded campsites near the banks of the New River. There are 10 wooded drive-in sites for RVs, campers, car camping, and tents; 6 walk-in tents sites; and 2 accessible sites by the river. Only small (less than 25 feet) and medium (22 - 31.5 feet) RVs are recommended due to the tight access road. Camp only at designated sites. RV, camper, or car camping in non-designated sites, walk-in sites, or any parking area is strictly prohibited. Grandview Sandbar 0.00 These primitive camping areas have no drinking water or hookups, and limited restroom facilities. All sites are managed on a first-come, first-served basis and reservations are not accepted. There are no fees for camping. Grandview Sandbar Campground A small grassy area covered in trees with a road around it and designated campsites. Grandview Sandbar Campground offers camping in the woods right next to the New River. Grandview Sandbar Drive-In Site A wooded campsite with two gravel parking spots in front of a camping pad with a picnic table. Grandview Sandbar Campground has 10 drive-in sites in the forest near the New River. Grandview Sandbar Walk-In Campsites A campsite with a picnic table and grill surrounded by trees and next to a large river. There are 6 walk-in tent only campsites next to the New River at Grandview Sandbar Campground. Grandview Sandbar Accessibility Campsite A campsite next to the river with a sign that designates it as an accessibility only campsite. There are two accessible campsites at Grandview Sandbar Campground located right next to the New River. Grandview Sandbar Restrooms A tan building on a grassy hill with three brown doors marked as restroom facilities. The restroom at Grandview Sandbar is primitive but also accessible. New River at Grandview Sandbar A rocky river bank next to a wide river flowing between tree covered shores The New River at Grandview Sandbar offers opportunities for relaxation, fishing, and white-water boating. Meadow Creek Campground This tent-only primitive campground located along the New River is only one mile from the Sandstone Visitor Center. It offers 17 tent sites in an open field. There are no drive-in sites at this campground. The railroad crossing is dangerous for RVs and trailers. RV, trailer, or car camping is prohibited. This campground is located close to active CSX freight railroad tracks and railroad crossing. Trains may pass through at any hour. Campers should expect to hear some noise such as train horns. Camping Fees 0.00 These primitive camping areas have no drinking water or hookups, and limited restroom facilities. All sites are managed on a first-come, first-served basis and reservations are not accepted. There are no fees for camping. Meadow Creek Campground open grassy field with campsites and a composting restroom facility in it Meadow Creek Campground has many sites for tents only in a large field on the banks of the New River. Meadow Creek Campground Entrance dirt road entering into large grassy campground Meadow Creek Campground Road is well compacted dirt that may be muddy in wet weather. Stone Cliff This tent only campground located near the historic railroad town of Thurmond offers 7 walk-in sites, 5 on the sandy beach of the New River and 2 in the nearby forest. There are no drive-in sites at this location. RV, camper, or car camping is prohibited. The Stone Cliff Trailhead also starts at the campground. Camping Fee 0.00 These primitive camping areas have no drinking water or hookups, and limited restroom facilities. All sites are managed on a first-come, first-served basis and reservations are not accepted. There are no fees for camping. Stone Cliff Campground Sign A brown sign with a drawing of a river on it that says Stone Cliff on it Stone Cliff Campground offers multiple walk-in campsites for tent camping visitors. Stone Cliff Campground A sandy beach next to a swift flowing river with a bridge over the river in the distance Stone Cliff Campground is located on the New River and offers opportunities for fishing, white water boating, and relaxation near your campsite. A Standard Wooded Walk-In Site at Stone Cliff Campground A campsite with a fire ring in a forested area covered with leaves Stone Cliff Campground offers 2 walk-in campsites in the forest near the New River. A Standard Beach Campsite at Stone Cliff Campground A sandy campsite with a fire ring near some green shrubby plants. Stone Cliff Campground offers 5 walk-in sites on the banks of the New River. Thayer Campground This tent only campground is located near the community of Thayer along the banks of the New River. It has 4 walk-in sites. There are no drive-in sites at this location. RV, camper, or car camping is prohibited. Alcohol is prohibited at this campground. Thayer Campground 0.00 These primitive camping areas have no drinking water or hookups, and limited restroom facilities. All sites are managed on a first-come, first-served basis and reservations are not accepted. There are no fees for camping. Thayer Campground campsite Thayer Campground War Ridge/Backus Mountain Campground This is the only campground in the park that is not along the river. It is located on a ridgetop near Backus Mountain. There are 8 drive-in sites for tents, RVs, or campers. Only small (less than 25 feet) RVs or campers are recommended. Camp only at designated sites. RV, camper, or car camping in non-designated sites or any parking area is strictly prohibited. War Ridge Campground 0.00 These primitive camping areas have no drinking water or hookups, and limited restroom facilities. All sites are managed on a first-come, first-served basis and reservations are not accepted. There are no fees for camping. War Ridge Campground campground with fog War Ridge Campground War Ridge Campground campground War Ridge Campground War Ridge Campground campground War Ridge Campground Sunrise at Diamond Point sun rising over the New River Gorge Sun rising over the New River Gorge from Diamond Point on the Endless Wall Trail. New River Gorge Bridge bridge spanning the river The New River Gorge Bridge spans across the New River. Horseshoe Bend from Grandview bend in the river The Horseshoe Bend in the New River from Grandview Thurmond Depot railroad tracks and depot Thurmond Depot Sandstone Falls waterfall spanning the river Sandstone Falls spans the New River Foggy morning fog and mountains Fog settles in the gorge Rhododendron at Turkey Spur pink rhododendron and view of the gorge and river View from Turkey Spur at Grandview Waterfall on Dowdy Creek waterfall and stream Waterfall on Dowdy Creek Riverscour Prairies Love Whitewater Too... The word “prairie” usually conjures images of herds of bison, rolling hills of grass waving in the wind, maybe a covered wagon and a little house. While the prairies along the New and Gauley Rivers are much smaller in size, they contain the same tall prairie grasses as found in the Midwest. They also harbor many rare plant species. The Eastern Rivers & Mountains Network collects information on the condition of riverscour prairies and how they are changing over time. Two people collecting data from a riverscour prairie vegetation monitoring plot Prescribed Fire Used to Promote Native Grasses and Understand Effects of Fire and Deer Browsing on Oak Regeneration Today’s wildland firefighters are practitioners of sound science. They rely on data gathered from research and past experience to make informed decisions when suppressing wildfires and conducting prescribed fires. Wildland Fire and Aviation firefighters in the Northeast Region (NER) are no different and they are starting the 2017 spring fire season off with a bang. A fireman walks through a controlled burn, holding a driptorch. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—New River Gorge National River, West Virginia Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] rock outcrop and trees NPS Participates in World Scout Jamboree Rangers from eight parks around the country traveled to New River Gorge National River to work alongside New River Gorge NR staff at the 24th World Scout Jamboree, July 22 – August 2, 2019, at the Summit Bechtel Reserve (SBR) in West Virginia, a site which borders the park. Approximately 45,000 Scouts from 157 different countries attended the event that was jointly hosted by Scouts Canada, Asociación de Scouts de México, and the Boy Scouts of America. The Future of Our Oak Forests: Can Fire and Fences Sustain Oak Forests for the Future? Oak-dominated forests are an important resource in the Appalachian Mountains, covering vast areas of the dry ridgetops and mesic hillsides. However, the future of these forests is uncertain due to the lack of regeneration that would form the future oak trees. Person crouched beside a forest health monitoring plot, recording data Bat Population Monitoring at New River Gorge National River New River Gorge National River protects over 70,000 acres of land along the New River. A diverse suite of natural resources can be found in the park, including several rare species of bats. For over a decade, biologists have been studying how park bat populations are changing. Since the introduction of white nose syndrome, several bat species have dramatically declined. A state-endangered little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus). Seeing the Forest and the Trees: Monitoring Program Yields Insights into Forest Health in Bluestone, Gauley River, and New River Gorge Within the New River Gorge National River, Gauley River National Recreation Area, and Bluestone National Scenic River, understanding the current condition of park forests and how the forests are changing is critical to long-term management of park ecosystems. One reason that monitoring forest health is so important—the forests are constantly changing. Storms, pests, pathogens, drought, and new species all play a role in shaping the forest. Forests lining the slopes and ridgetops in New River Gorge Forest Health in a Regional Context Eight Inventory and Monitoring networks have been collaborating on forest health monitoring since 2005. Participants include 61 national parks in the eastern United States. As a result of this collaboration, vegetation data are collected in similar ways, which allows us to compare various parks across the region. One person on the forest floor collecting data, while another records the data So Many Mushrooms! It started as a personal project. Biological technician Sarah Daugherty would be out collecting data for the Eastern Rivers and Mountains Network’s forest health monitoring program, and notice so many cool mushrooms. She started taking photos and jotting down what she saw. Soon, she noticed that many of the species she was finding weren't on park species lists. Discussing her discoveries with her colleagues, everyone agreed that a more formal fungi inventory was in order. Mushrooms of different colors, shapes, and sizes, laid out next to each other on a floor Silent Witnesses, Old Trees are Hiding in Our Midst An article about old trees in Eastern Rivers and Mountains Network (ERMN) parks. ERMN scientists have collected cores from two "average" looking canopy trees adjacent to every permanent long-term forest health monitoring plot in network parks. Of the 700 trees cored, over 60 of them hovered near 200 years old. A woman uses an increment borer to take a core sample from a tree. 2019 Weather In Review: New River Gorge National River In 2019, the park experienced near record-setting temperatures, and it was the 2nd warmest year since 1895. In contrast, it was a near-normal year for precipitation. A view of fall foliage and the New River form a high overlook. Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Pennsylvanian Period—323.2 to 298.9 MYA Rocks in Cumberland Gap National Historical Park represent vast Pennsylvanian-age swamps. Plant life in those swamps later became coal found in the eastern United States. fossil tracks on sandstone slab Mississippian Period—358.9 to 323.2 MYA The extensive caves of Mammoth Cave and Wind Cave national parks developed in limestone deposited during the Mississippian. Warm, shallow seas covered much of North America, which was close to the equator. fossil crinoid Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix 2020 Weather In Review: New River Gorge National Park and Preserve New River Gorge National Park and Preserve had a very warm and very wet 2020. The year ended as the 10th warmest and 4th wettest recorded since 1895. An view from an overlook of fall foliage and the New River. All Hope is Not Lost – Parks plan strategically to treat invasive plants Managing invasive plant species can seem like an endless and insurmountable challenge, but parks are using a new strategic collaborative tool to protect their most valuable resources. Four photos show invasive plants spreading over an area during 12 years Plan Like a Park Ranger: Top 10 Tips for visiting New River Gorge Check in with a ranger for our top 10 tips for visiting New River Gorge National Park and Preserve. close up of park ranger Protecting Oak Forests in National Parks New River Gorge National Park and Preserve is experimenting with ways to protect the next generation of oak forests using fire and fences at two mountaintop sites in the park. More tree seedlings and plants grow inside a deer exclosure fence than outside the fence. Grandview shelters & picnic area receive makeover The park received $280,000 in funding from the Great American Outdoors Act to address long deferred maintenance on the historic Grandview shelters and picnic area. NPS Historic Preservation Training Center, Park, and AmeriCorps Members working. Triaging Invasive Plants: Strategic Planning Drives Success A winning strategy to combat invasive plants becomes a potent tool for restoring special places in several eastern parks. Rachel Vincent removes invasive knotweed from a historic stone wall Hazardous Fuel Reduction Treatments in the National Capital Area Protects Structures In 2021, wildland fire staff throughout Interior Region (IR) 1 and the National Capital Area continued safeguarding National Park Service (NPS)-owned structures by reducing brush and trees adjacent to them. These efforts adhere to the Wildland Fire Risk Assessment Project, a bureau-wide effort focused on creating and maintaining defensible space around NPS-owned infrastructure. Mastication of fuels surrounding the historic township of Walpack PA Changing Patterns of Water Availability May Change Vegetation Composition in US National Parks Across the US, changes in water availability are altering which plants grow where. These changes are evident at a broad scale. But not all areas experience the same climate in the same way, even within the boundaries of a single national park. A new dataset gives park managers a valuable tool for understanding why vegetation has changed and how it might change in the future under different climate-change scenarios. Green, orange, and dead grey junipers in red soil, mountains in background 2021 Weather In Review: New River Gorge National Park and Preserve New River Gorge National Park and Preserve had a warm 2021 but total precipitation was near normal. The year ended as the 19th warmest and 57th driest recorded since 1895. A purple sunset over the gorge Resilient Forests Initiative - Managing Invasive Plants & Pests Park forests are threatened by invasive plants and pests. Strategically tackling invasive plants to protect park’s highest priority natural resources and planning around forest pests and pathogens are important actions in managing resilient forests. Forest Regeneration Series: Managing Resilient Forests Initiative for Eastern National Parks Forests in the northeastern U.S. are in peril. Over-abundant deer, invasive plants, and insect pests are negatively impacting park forests, threatening to degrade the scenic vistas and forested landscapes that parks are renowned for. With regional collaboration, parks can manage these impacts and help forests be resilient. This article series explores tools available to park managers to achieve their goals. Healthy forests have many native seedlings and saplings. I&M Networks Support Resilient Forest Management NPS Inventory and Monitoring Networks have been tracking forest health in eastern national parks since 2006. This monitoring information can guide resilient forest management and support parks in adapting to changing conditions through the actions described below. Forest health monitoring Streamside Bird Monitoring in New River Gorge National Park and Preserve Streamside bird monitoring at New River Gorge National Park and Preserve from 2007-2019 indicates that 62% of bird species that breed in the park during the summer have stable or increasing populations. Black and white striped bird standing on a limb Managing Resilient Forests. A Regional Initiative Forests cover tens of thousands of acres in eastern national parks and these critical resources face a range of interacting stressors: over-abundant white-tailed deer populations, invasive plant dominance, novel pests and pathogens, among other threats. The Resilient Forests Initiative will help parks address these issue collectively. Forest health monitoring Resilient Forests Initiative - Forest Complexity Much of the forest in the eastern United States is around the same age, regrowing after widespread land clearing that peaked between the 1880's and 1920's. Throughout the twentieth century, forests began to regenerate, eventually spreading onto abandoned agricultural lands. Canopy gap Veterans Fire Crew Completes Season at New River Gorge In mid-April 2022, the AmeriCorps/Conservation Legacy Veterans Fire Crew concluded their season at the New River Gorge National Park and Preserve (NERI). The crew completed a four-month training/work program that provided five individuals with various experience involving typical work projects carried out by wildland firefighters. Two firefighters discussing fuels between two historic buildings Veterans’ skills parlay success reaching fire management goals for the National Park Service As part of the Veterans Fire Corps initiative, NPS conducted a pilot training program in 2022 composed of veterans from the Army and Marine Corps. The crew worked in New River Gorge National Park and Preserve in WV and Cuyahoga Valley National Park in OH, completing fire and fuels management work on 250 acres. Two crewmembers work on a hillside near a sign for Sandstone Visitor Center. Series: Geologic Time—Major Divisions and NPS Fossils The National Park System contains a magnificent record of geologic time because rocks from each period of the geologic time scale are preserved in park landscapes. The geologic time scale is divided into four large periods of time—the Cenozoic Era, Mesozoic Era, Paleozoic Era, and The Precambrian. photo of desert landscape with a petrified wood log on the surface Win-win for veterans and NPS fire management The Veterans Fire Corps initiative is a win-win for veterans and NPS fire management. The success of a veteran fire crew assigned to the Allegheny Fire Management Zone is revealed in this story map. The team completed work on 250 acres of land, performing a variety of tasks that included historical land restoration, invasive species treatment, fuels reduction, and burn preparation from January to April 2022. Five people stand together in wooded area wearing matching shirts with logos. 2022 Weather in Review: New River Gorge National Park and Preserve The year 2022 was slightly warmer and much wetter than average at New River Gorge National Park and Preserve. The year ended as the 44th warmest and 19 wettest on record (since 1895). A view of the river from an overlook with rhododendron blooming Trails&Rails 2023 National Conference Current NPS Director Chuck Sams addresses attendees at the 2023 National Trails&Rails Operations Conference. A large group of people sit facing forward at tables arranged in a U shap National Park Service Youth Programs Staff Visit New River Gorge National Park and Preserve in Preparation for the Boy Scouts National Jamboree On February 13-15, NPS staff from the Youth Programs Office of the Workforce and Inclusion Directorate visited New River Gorge National Park and Preserve in preparation for the Boy Scouts National Jamboree taking place July 19-28, 2023. Five NPS staff standing on either side in front of the New River Gorge park sign NPS Resilient Forest Initiative Restores Forest Ecosystems in Appalachian National Parks In Appalachia, forests are crucial to the health of ecosystems and local communities in and around National Parks. However, forest health monitoring in eastern National Parks has shown that park forests are rapidly changing, and don’t have enough tree regeneration to replace canopy trees as they fall or die. Bipartisan Infrastructure Law funds are being used to support the Resilient Forest Initiative in the restoration efforts within these parks. Two NPS workers in a forest. Project Profile: Manage Forest Invasive Species in Appalachia The National Park Service will enhance forest resilience on more than 2,000 acres across eight parks in Appalachia, with benefits to local economies and watershed health. Forests in Pennsylvania and West Virginia national parks are experiencing regeneration failure as indicated by inadequate saplings and low numbers of seedlings. a man uses a hand lens to monitor a seedling up close Project Profile: Restore Healthy Forest Ecosystems in Appalachia The National Park Service will enhance forest resilience on more than 2,000 acres across eight parks in Appalachia, with benefits to local economies, watershed health, and visitors. two people, one in national park service uniform examine the forest floor of a deciduous forest Project Profile: Mitigate Three Abandoned Mine Hazards at New River Gorge National Park and Preserve The National Park Service will mitigate three abandoned mine hazards at New River Gorge National Park and Preserve, improving public safety and health and restoring the surrounding landscape. an abandoned mine portal site with rusty fan and vegetation reclaiming the area Become a New River Gorge B.A.R.K. Ranger! Do you like exploring national parks with a four legged friend? Learn the rules of B.A.R.K., take the B.A.R.K. Ranger pledge, and certify your pet as an official New River Gorge B.A.R.K. Ranger! A happy grey and white dog with a bark ranger tag on his collar. Shaping the System Under President Jimmy Carter President Jimmy Carter oversaw one of the largest growths in the National Park System. Explore some of the parks that are part of the legacy of the presidency of Jimmy Carter, who served as the 39th president of the United States from January 20, 1977, to January 20, 1981. Historic photo of Jimmy Carter walking through a crowd at Harpers Ferry Allegheny Fire Management provides opportunities for Veteran Fire Corp Tom's Wilson's journey into the Veteran Fire Corps (VFC) began online. When he saw a VFC opportunity with the National Park Service (NPS), he was reminded of his childhood exploring the national parks system with his family and filling out the NPS passport book. Excited to combine his love of the outdoors with his passion for service, he applied for the position and was accepted into Interior Region 1’s inaugural VFC program. Closeup of a male wildland firefighter with forest in the background Unified Command proves successful in Wild Rock Fire The Wild Rock fire broke out in the New River Gorge on the afternoon of November 9, 2022. The fire started on private land, quickly spread into the park, and threatened nearby homes and businesses. A quick and unified response from National Park Service (NPS) and Fayette County Fire and Emergency Services prevented the loss of homes and structures. A helicopter drops water from a bucket suspended beneath it Unlocking Earth's Secrets, Layer by Layer Those splendid rocks in our national parks aren’t just scenic wonders; they’re scientific and cultural treasures. A new geological inventory could help protect them. Two women with helmets look at a multi-layered rock cliff

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