"Los Alamos during the Manhattan Project" by Jeff Keyzer , public domain

Manhattan Project

National Historical Park - New Mexico

Manhattan Project National Historical Park commemorates the Manhattan Project. The park consists of three units: one in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, one in Los Alamos, New Mexico and one in Hanford, Washington.

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Map of the Westward Expansion of the Santa Fe Trail for Fort Larned National Historic Site (NHS) in Kansas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Santa Fe - Santa Fe Trail Westward Expansion

Map of the Westward Expansion of the Santa Fe Trail for Fort Larned National Historic Site (NHS) in Kansas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official Visitor Map of Santa Fe National Historic Trail (NHT) in Colorado, Kansas, Misouri, New Mexico and Oklahoma. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Santa Fe - National Historic Trail

Official Visitor Map of Santa Fe National Historic Trail (NHT) in Colorado, Kansas, Misouri, New Mexico and Oklahoma. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Visitor Map of Carson National Forest (NF) in New Mexico. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Carson - Visitor Map

Visitor Map of Carson National Forest (NF) in New Mexico. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Map of Los Alamos Area Trails in New Mexico. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Los Alamos - Trails Map

Map of Los Alamos Area Trails in New Mexico. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Official Visitor Map of Bandelier National Monument (NM) in New Mexico. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Bandelier - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Bandelier National Monument (NM) in New Mexico. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

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Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

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Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of the Southwestern area of Santa Fe National Forest (NF) in New Mexico. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Santa Fe MVUM - Southwest 2024

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of the Southwestern area of Santa Fe National Forest (NF) in New Mexico. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Tourist-Road Map of New Mexico. Published by the New Mexico Department of Transportation.New Mexico - Tourist-Road Map

Tourist-Road Map of New Mexico. Published by the New Mexico Department of Transportation.

https://www.nps.gov/mapr/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manhattan_Project_National_Historical_Park Manhattan Project National Historical Park commemorates the Manhattan Project. The park consists of three units: one in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, one in Los Alamos, New Mexico and one in Hanford, Washington. The Manhattan Project is one of the most transformative events of the 20th century. It ushered in the nuclear age with the development of the world’s first atomic bombs. The building of atomic weapons began in 1942 in three secret communities across the nation. As World War II waned in 1945, the United States dropped the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan—forever changing the world. Manhattan Project National Historical Park is located in three states: New Mexico, Tennessee, and Washington. For more information on accessing each of these three units, visit our Directions & Transportation page. Hanford Visitor Center Located in the city of Richland, this is the main visitor contact point for the Manhattan Project National Historical Park in the Tri-Cities. Take State Highway 240 North. Turn right on Logston Blvd. Building is on the right, with a red roof. Los Alamos Visitor Center At the Los Alamos Visitor Center you can speak with park rangers, tour exhibits about the Manhattan Project in Los Alamos, and learn more about where to go in town. Take Central Avenue or 502/Trinity Drive to 20th Street. Oak Ridge Visitor Center The Oak Ridge Visitor Center is located within the Children's Museum of Oak Ridge. Here you are able to speak with National Park Service rangers, watch a short film on the Manhattan Project, and get literature on Manhattan Project-related historic sites throughout Oak Ridge. Visitor Center services are limited on Sundays, but brochures, maps, and site films are available. Children's Museum of Oak Ridge 461 W. Outer Dr. Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (865) 482-1942 Tri-Cities Visitor Center Visit Tri-Cities is the tourism information center for the local area. This is a great place to stop by for helpful trip-planning advice for visiting the park and numerous other attractions in the Tri-Cities. The helpful staff can provide you with itineraries for visits to the Tri-Cities region and suggest entertainment, lodging, and dining options. You may also purchase souvenir items and stamp your national parks passport here. Visit Tri-Cities may be reached at 509-735-8486. Top Secret! a green background with "Top Secret" and atomic diagrams The Manhattan Project was a top-secret project focused on building the world's first atomic weapons. B Reactor Under Construction Black and white photograph of a construction site with scaffolding and workers visible. Constructing the B Reactor, the world's first full scale nuclear reactor, took hard work and ingenuity. Ashley Pond a landscaped pond with fountain in front of snowy mountains and a blue sky with clouds Ashley Pond has been a central part of the Los Alamos community since the days before the Manhattan Project. Bruggemann Ranch Color photograph of a large field of wild grass with a stone building in the background. The Bruggemann Ranch was a major farm that was forcibly evacuated to create the Hanford Site. Oppenheimer and Groves at Trinity Test Site Two men stand next to a mangled piece of metal equipment in the desert. J. Robert Oppenheimer and Gen. Leslie Groves at the Trinity Test Site. The Gadget A man stands next to a complicated, spherical device covered in wires Norris Bradbury stands next to the Gadget, the device used in the Trinity Test. Calutron Girls black and white photo of group of women sitting at their individual stations in the Y-12 plant The Calutron Girls operated the arrays, or “racetracks”, at Oak Ridge’s Y-12 Electromagnetic Isotope Separation Plant during the Manhattan Project. International Friendship Bell Ranger facing a large bronze cast bell hanging from an abstract pavilion surrounded by green space The International Friendship Bell in Oak Ridge, Tennessee symbolizes peace and reconciliation between the United States and Japan. Manhattan Project Science at Los Alamos On April 20, 1943, the University of California signed a contract with the United States Army Corps of Engineers to operate a secret laboratory hidden away in the mountains of northern New Mexico. This laboratory soon became home to some of the most revolutionary science in US history. Led by scientist J. Robert Oppenheimer, the staff at this secret Manhattan Project location called Los Alamos was responsible for the development and testing of nuclear weapons. Six scientists gathered around a large, hanging metal sphere Symbols of Peace in the Manhattan Project Communities More than 200,000 people died by the end of 1945 as a direct result of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan on August 6 and 9, 1945. After World War II ended, Japan and the United States worked faithfully to move toward peace. In the decades since the end of World War II, the two countries have evolved from bitter enemies to close allies. In addition, the three primary Manhattan Project communities have reflected on the bombings in poignant ways. A small bell hangs to the right of a cube-shaped package. White Sands New Mexico: The National Park Service, the US Army and the Atomic Bomb The future of White Sands, and for that matter the nation as a whole, reached a watershed in the spring of 1945. The sequence of events in the Tularosa basin from April to August 1945 created the "atomic age" tensions that bedeviled the monument for the next five decades. Trinity atomic bomb last Victory Gardens at Oak Ridge With the pressing demands of feeding the nation’s fighting forces and the nationwide rationing of canned foods there was a desire and need for people to grow locally. Victory Gardens could be found all over the country during WWII, from the backyards in Oak Ridge to the rooftops in New York City. a man hand plows a home garden on a hillside Harry Truman’s Decision to Use the Atomic Bomb President Harry S Truman was notified of the successful test of the atomic bomb, what he called “the most terrible bomb in the history of the world.” Thousands of hours of research and development as well as billions of dollars had contributed to its production. This was no theoretical research project. It was created to destroy and kill on a massive scale. As president, it was Harry Truman’s decision if the weapon would be used with the goal to end the war. image of atomic bomb devastation in Japan Manhattan Project Science at Hanford The plutonium production process at Hanford was developed from what Enrico Fermi and his team proved when they constructed the world’s first, albeit small-scale, nuclear reactor in Chicago in 1942. If a reactor could be built sufficiently large, the intense flow of neutrons within it could, almost magically, change uranium into plutonium. This process of transmutation would not be creating gold from straw or lead but would be creating something much more valuable. Aerial photo of industrial complex with concrete buildings, tall vent stacks, and water towers. The Story of Sadako Sasaki The story of Sadako Sasaki, a young girl who lived through the bombing of Hiroshima, and eventually died from leukemia, is just one of many stories from Hiroshima on August 6th, 1945. Yet, Sadako’s story still resonates with many people today. Like many others living in Hiroshima following World War II, the Sasaki family struggled with sickness, financial hardship, food scarcity, and the uncertainty of their families’ future. A young Japanese girl wearing all white standing in front of a hospital The Atomic Legacy On August 5th, 1945, the vast majority of people in the United States and around the world had no concept of an atomic bomb, no realization of the Manhattan Project, and nothing in collective thought that could prepare them for the massive cultural shift that would begin the next day. Then everything changed. Learn more about the dramatic cultural impact the atomic bomb had, and continues to have, throughout the globe. 1954 Godzilla film poster. Manhattan Project Science at Oak Ridge The creation of Oak Ridge, Tennessee, called Kingston Demolition Range and Clinton Engineer Works during the Manhattan Project, centered around one main goal- the development of enriched uranium for atomic weapons. The three facilities that achieved this goal, the Y-12 Electromagnetic Isotope Separation Plant, the K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and the S-50 Liquid Thermal Diffusion Plant, did so in markedly different ways. Black and white aerial photo of S-50. A large complex along a river bend with several smoekstacks The Atomic Bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki The atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki on August 6 and August 9, 1945 forever changed the world. Within a span of three days, two entire cities were virtually destroyed, with approximately 200,000 casualties as a result. The only time atomic weapons have ever been used in war, the bombings remain a point of controversy to this day. Learn more about the precise events that led up to those two fateful mornings. Nagasaki destruction, hillside in distance with almost no structures remaining Manhattan Project Site Selection In September, 1942 United States Army General Leslie R. Groves was assigned to manage the Manhattan Project. He acquired funding, mobilized a diverse workforce including attracting top scientists, and selected the ideal locations for the project to ensure secrecy and success in this new, top-secret undertaking. Ultimately, Groves approved three locations for this new clandestine project: Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Hanford, Washington, and Los Alamos, New Mexico. Black and white photo of an earth mover, concrete tubing, and several workers in a muddy field. Top 10 Tips for Visiting Manhattan Project NHP This Summer Tips to make the most out of your visit to Manhattan Project NHP. Before the Bomb: Inclusive Archeology in the Cultural Landscape of the Manhattan Project National Historic Site The site at TA-18 does retain its historic integrity, and although it currently has a much different use at the moment, it ceased operations as a research facility in 2007, and is now opened primarily as a potential interpretive site as part of the Manhattan Project National Historical Site this aerial view, although it focuses on the more modern structures associated with the Manhattan Project, it represents about 1,500 years of continuous human occupation. Aerial view: Site TA-18 - a cluster of buildings, roads, landscape - Los Alamos National Laboratory Hispanic Homesteaders and the Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory was created to develop the atomic bomb. The government decided on Los Alamos County in New Mexico as a site for the Manhattan Project. Most of the land already belonged to the government as part of the Forest Service, but there was a community of Hispanic homesteaders and other property owners in the area. The homesteaders received less than their Anglo counterparts for their land. In 2005, they received reparations for the unfair treatment. two log buildings in the mountains Karen Dorn Steele Karen Dorn Steele is an environmental journalist known for breaking the story of nuclear experiments causing potential public health damage at the Hanford Nuclear Site. Woman in white lab coat and cap stands in the middle of five journalists inside the PUREX Plant. Leona Woods Marshall Libby Dr. Leona Woods Marshall Libby was the only female member of the team that built the world’s first nuclear reactor—the Chicago Pile—and the only woman present when the reactor went critical. Professional woman in coat and scarf speaks to man in suit, showing piece of paper Trinity Test Downwinders On July 16, 1945, a loud, blinding explosion surprised New Mexicans around the Tularosa Basin. Trinity, the world’s first nuclear test, was top secret. Manhattan Project leaders did not inform people living nearby or downwind about the test or potential exposure to fallout. Map of New Mexico showing the Trinity Test Site as a white star and nearby cities as white dots Series: Women's History in the Pacific West - Columbia-Pacific Northwest Collection Biographies of women from parks in Washington, Oregon Idaho and far western Montana Map of Washington, Oregon and Idaho Japan During World War II Japan during World War II was home to approximately 72 million people. At the start of the war, the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki were home to 345,000 and 250,000 people respectively. Learn more about the effects of the war on the Japanese people, including the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August of 1945. Black and white photo of a busy street in Hiroshima. The Calutron Girls The Calutron Girls operated the arrays, or racetracks, at the Y-12 Electromagnetic Isotope Separation Plant in Oak Ridge during the Manhattan Project. These young women, many of whom were just out of high school, did not know that their work involved separating uranium for use in an atomic bomb. Black and white photo of several women seated along a long hallway covered in knobs and dials. The Life of J. Robert Oppenheimer: Life Before the Manhattan Project First in a series of three, this article highlights the pre-Manhattan Project Era life of Robert Oppenheimer, from his birthplace in New York to his time in New Mexico as a young man, followed by his college years, and into teaching at CalTech and Berkeley in California. On the cusp of Communism and political left-wing leanings, Oppenheimer finds himself, and the career he developed for many years, in the arena of atomic weapons and the start of World II. Black and white photo of J. Robert Oppenheimer at Harvard. First National Bank of White Bluffs The First National Bank of White Bluffs served the small pre-Manhattan Project community of White Bluffs. The economy of White Bluffs grew to the size to support a bank in the later part of the first decade of the twentieth century. New irrigation systems resulted in an increase in the number of new farms in the area and a bank in the area would allow potential new farmers in the area to finance their farms. The bank was built in 1907-1908. The interior of a cluttered bank. A man in a suit stands at the center-left of the room. Wanawish/Horn Rapids Dam At the turn of the nineteenth century, farmers and entrepreneurs dreamed of large irrigation projects to transform Washington’s arid Priest Rapids Valley into a fertile breadbasket rivaling California. Soon irrigation ditches and canals both real and planned crisscrossed the region. Constructed in 1892, the Horn Rapids Dam (renamed Wanawish Dam in 1997) was the cornerstone to irrigation efforts along the lower Yakima River. Black and white photo of a small wooden dam on a narrow river with scrub brush along the banks. Manley Bostwick Haynes and Judge Cornelius Holgate Hanford  Judge Cornelius Holgate Hanford and his son-in-law Manley Bostwick Haynes established the town of Hanford at the turn of the 20th century. From establishing an irrigation district to constructing commercial buildings and homes, Hanford and Haynes transformed the Priest Rapids Valley for decades. In 1942, the valley was radically transformed again with the arrival of the Manhattan Project. Manley Bostwick Haynes wearing a suit as he glares at an angle from the camera. Howard Amon Park W. R. Amon and his son, Howard S. Amon, first settled in Washington’s lower Yakima Valley in 1904 when the pair purchased the large expansive Rosencrance Ranch from Ben Rosencrance, located on what is now Lee Boulevard and Goethals Drive in Richland near the Columbia River. In 1911, Howard Amon presented to the town of Richland the deed to Amon Park as a gift to the community. Black and white photo of a tree line with a fence and brick arch in front of it. Town of Hanford The name Hanford is forever tied to the Manhattan Project and development of the world’s first atomic weapons, but few traces remain of the town upon whose ruins the nuclear age was born. Although the town of Hanford was less than 40 years old when government bulldozers leveled its buildings to construct plutonium production facilities in the early 1940s, its residents had already built a resilient community and agricultural economy. Black and white photo of two homes in sagebrush. The homes are side by side. Vernita Vernita was one of the many small communities that developed during a period of settlement at the turn of the twentieth century. Today, few signs remain of the former community. Located in northern Benton County with the Priest Rapids Dam upriver and the abandoned town of White Bluffs downriver, Vernita marked a historic embarkation point for travelers crossing the Columbia River. Twelve children gather on the steps of an old schoolhouse. Ice Age Floods Approximately fifteen thousand years ago, roaring walls of water hundreds of feet high ripped through the Priest Rapids Valley at 80 miles per hour (128.75 kph), scarring the hills and ridges, gouging out new ravines and coulees, and leaving sediment strewn across the landscape. All human and animal life in the path of the raging waters died instantly. Floods on this massive scale happened not once, but hundreds of times over the course of the last Ice Age. Color photo of a large lake surrounded by steep rocky outcroppings. Cemetery Removal When the Hanford Site construction began in 1943, several cemeteries existed in the Priest Rapids Valley. Most of these cemeteries were not in areas of construction and would be left undisturbed; however, the White Bluffs Cemetery laid in the path of development. That cemetery was forced to relocate, along with several family burial plots, for what the residents knew of at the time as the “Hanford Engineer Works Project.” A large grave in the foreground of a manicured cemetery. Preserving World War II-era Atomic Weapons Research and Development Sites Challenges of creating a Manhattan Project National Historical Park unit. Historic photo – five people in front of a log and stone cabin surrounded by tall pine trees. Preserving the Pajarito Site at Los Alamos National Laboratory Documenting, and preserving cultural landscapes of the Manhattan Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Weathered log cabin with a metal roof and a stone chimney - surrounded by overgrown scrub. Displacement at Hanford The Hanford area’s contributions to the Manhattan Project and World War II started with the peoples living in and around the Priest Rapids Valley. In early 1942 the approximately 1,500 residents of the region were informed that the government had acquired their lands under the war power authority. Landowners were given small settlements and 30-90 days to be off their land. The Army also barred area Tribes, who had used the area for traditional practices for time immemorial. Black and white photo of an horticultural exchange with people and livestock surrounding it. Walla Walla Council (1855) The rights and stipulations enumerated in the treaties of 1855 still impact local tribes. Fishing and hunting on ceded land remain cherished rights. These treaties also codified arbitrary boundaries drawn by United States officials when delineating tribal identities. The Yakama Treaty confederated fourteen disparate tribal bands into the Yakama Nation while the Walla Walla, Cayuse, and Umatilla Treaty placed three separate tribes onto one reservation. An 18th century drawing showing several dozen Native Americans gathered around tents. Series: The Life of J. Robert Oppenheimer A controversial figure to this day, J. Robert Oppenheimer led the development and construction of the world's first atomic weapons. This article series explores his life from a young man, to his role in the Manhattan Project, to his blacklisting at the height of the Cold War's "Red Scare." Black and white photo of J. Robert Oppenheimer seated in a suit with a cigarette in his left hand. Chicago, IL The University of Chicago bustled with activity during the Manhattan Project. Dozens of scientists gathered here at the university’s Metallurgical Laboratory to research enrichment methods for the top-secret project, culminating in the creation of the Chicago Pile, the world’s first experimental nuclear reactor. Learn more about Chicago’s role in the project by following the link. Black and white photo of a university building with several cars at the front. From Production to Cleanup: The Tri-Party Agreement The Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), was signed on May 15, 1989, between the US Department of Energy, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the State of Washington. This was a critical milestone in history of the Hanford Site, which produced nearly two-thirds of the plutonium for the nation’s nuclear weapons program from 1943 through 1988. Two men and one woman sign documents at a table while three men stand behind. Washington, DC During the Manhattan Project, Washington, DC was home to the offices of project leader General Leslie Groves. Operating out of a small two-room office in the New War Building, Groves and a handful of staff directed the far-reaching top-secret project and the thousands of personnel it employed. Black and white aerial photo of a city showing several buildings and a large greenspace. Los Alamos: Oppenheimer House Panoramic Tour Explore a panoramic image of the living room inside the house that Los Alamos Laboratory Director J. Robert Oppenheimer stayed in with his family in Los Alamos during the Manhattan Project. Color photo of a stone and wood house nestled among pine trees. Ames, IA The Ames Project, located in Ames, Iowa produced purified uranium metal for the Manhattan Project, first on an experimental and then on a mass scale. Learn more about the role Ames played during and after the project. Black and white photo of a small one-story building. Hanford: Morning Star Baptist Church Panoramic Tour Explore a panoramic image of the interior of Morning Star Baptist Church, the first African American church in the city of Pasco. Reverend Johnnie Steward founded the church in 1946 for the growing Black population of East Pasco. African American workers at the Hanford Site were segregated at work and in the community during the 1940s and 1950s. They had to live in East Pasco, which lacked many city services. An image of a plaque that reads The Life of J. Robert Oppenheimer: The Manhattan Project Years (1941 to 1946) The second article in a series of three explores J. Robert Oppenheimer's role during the Manhattan Project. Oppenheimer was appointed Director of the top-secret Los Alamos Laboratory during the Manhattan Project. It was here that he and hundreds of staff toiled in secret, their work culminating in the Trinity Test, the world's first atomic weapon detonation. Robert Oppenheimer poses unsmiling in security badge photo. “K6” is in text in front of his necktie. The Gadget The Gadget was the first atomic bomb ever detonated to test the complex implosion design using plutonium. On July 16, 1945 at 5:29 AM Mountain War Time, the Gadget successfully detonated in the remote New Mexico desert, officially ushering in the atomic age. A man stands next to a large orb with wires surrounding it. Origami Cranes The origami crane has become a symbol of resilience, strength, and peace. This article includes directions on how to make a traditional folded origami crane and includes a template of an origami crane drawing that you can printout and color. As you make the crane, reflect on what peace means to you. You can even write a message of peace on your cranes and hang them up. Several colorful origami cranes next to each other. Growing Up in Richland Before 1943 the population of Richland, Washington was a mere 250 people. By the end of 1945, it had exploded to 15,000 as the DuPont Company and the Manhattan Project took over the town. DuPont permitted only permanent white-collar Hanford employees to reside in its new, planned, community, making Richland essentially a segregated city. But to the children of Hanford workers, Richland was a wonderful place to grow up, providing everything a child could ask for. Three young boys stand in a yard holding ribbons. The Green Run On December 2, 1949, the Atomic Energy Commission and the United States Air Force conducted the “Green Run” experiment at the Hanford Nuclear production complex outside Richland, WA. It was the largest single release of radioactive iodine-131 in Hanford’s history, covering vegetation as far north as Kettle Falls, WA and as far south as Klamath Falls, OR. A large industrial complex on a desert plain. Wendover Air Base, Utah In early September 1944, Lieutenant Colonel Paul Tibbets of the Army Air Forces, who probably knew more about the new B-29 bombers than any other pilot, was called to a closed military meeting. There he was put in charge of a secret project to prepare modified B-29s and their crews to be used delivering the atomic bomb to Japan. He was given his choice of three airfields: Wendover, Utah; Great Bend, Kansas; or Mountain Home, Idaho. Black and white aerial photo of runways and hangers in the desert next to steep mountains. (H)our History Lesson: African American Life in WWII Oak Ridge, TN This lesson plan explores the history of African American life in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, a major site of the Manhattan Project. It is part of a series about Oak Ridge, designated an American World War II Heritage City in 2022 by the Secretary of the Interior. African American teenagers dance inside a building. A Series of Lessons on Oak Ridge, TN, WWII Heritage City This lesson series helps students explore the importance of Oak Ridge, Tennessee as an American World War II Heritage City. These lessons highlight the workers of Oak Ridge, with specific focus on contributions of women and African American workers, and the short- and long-term effects of the area having produced material for the atomic bombs dropped on Japan. A map of the United States with arrows connecting Hanford, Oak Ridge, and Los Alamos (H)our History Lesson: Innovation and Employment in WWII Oak Ridge, TN This lesson plan explores the history of World War II-era innovation and employment in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, a major site of the Manhattan Project. It is part of a series about Oak Ridge, designated an American World War II Heritage City in 2022 by the Secretary of the Interior. A museum display (H)our History Lesson: Oak Ridge, TN and the Atomic Bomb This lesson plan explores the impact of the atomic bomb on Oak Ridge, Tennessee, a major site of the Manhattan Project. It is part of a series about Oak Ridge, designated an American World War II Heritage City in 2022 by the Secretary of the Interior. A group of people in front of a movie theater. A man in an usher uniform is in center. (H)our History Lesson: Oak Ridge, TN: Comparing and Connecting WWII Home Front Cities This lesson is part of a series teaching about the World War II home front. Oak Ridge, Tennessee is an American WWII Heritage City. It combines lesson themes from the three other lessons in the collection to summarize the city’s contributions and encourage connections to the overall US home front efforts. Museum display with a missile against a photo of a mushroom cloud. Tinian Island During the Manhattan Project Tinian Island, after being taken from the Japanese in fierce combat, was used as an airfield for United States’ B-29 Superfortresses in their bombing runs on the main islands of Japan. Early on August 6, 1945, pilot Paul Tibbets and his crew in the B-29 Enola Gay left Tinian for Hiroshima, Japan, to drop the uranium bomb Little Boy. Then on August 9, Charles Sweeny in the B-29 Bockscar carried the plutonium bomb Fat Man to Nagasaki. Black and white photo of Tinian airfield showing several parked B-29s. Oak Ridge X-10: 1941- The United States Enters World War II An exhibit panel at the X-10 Graphite Reactor describing the United States' entrance into World War II in 1941. An interpretive panel titled "1941- The United States Enters World War II" Oak Ridge X-10: 1940- American Discoveries An exhibit panel at the X-10 Graphite Reactor describing American advancements in atomic science in 1940. An interpretive panel titled "1940- American Discoveries" Oak Ridge X-10: 1939- The Atomic Age Opens An exhibit panel at the X-10 Graphite Reactor describing the dawn of the atomic age in 1939. An interpretive panel titled "1939- The Atomic Age Opens" Oak Ridge X-10: 1945- The Bombs Drop, World War II Ends An exhibit panel at the X-10 Graphite Reactor describing the use of atomic bombs on Japan in 1945. An interpretive panel titled "1945- The Bombs Drop, WWII Ends" Oak Ridge X-10: 1944- The Race to the Bomb An exhibit panel at the X-10 Graphite Reactor describing the race to build an atomic bomb in 1944. An interpretive panel titled "1944- The Race to the Bomb" Oak Ridge X-10: 1943- Graphite Reactor is Born An exhibit panel at the X-10 Graphite Reactor describing its construction in 1943. An interpretive panel titled "1943- Graphite Reactor is Born" Oak Ridge X-10: 1943- Graphite Reactor Goes Critical An exhibit panel at the X-10 Graphite Reactor describing the reactor reaching criticality in 1943. An interpretive panel titled "1943- Graphite Reactor Goes Critical" Oak Ridge X-10: 1942- Ushering in the Atomic Age An exhibit panel at the X-10 Graphite Reactor describing the rapid advancements in building nuclear reactors in 1942. An interpretive panel titled "1942- Ushering in the Atomic Age" Oak Ridge X-10: Two Nobel Laureates An exhibit panel at the X-10 Graphite Reactor describing two Nobel Laureates at ORNL. An interpretive panel titled "Two Nobel Laureates" Oak Ridge X-10: Neutron Sciences An exhibit panel at the X-10 Graphite Reactor describing modern science at ORNL. An interpretive panel titled "Neutron Sciences" Oak Ridge X-10: Graphite Reactor Firsts An exhibit panel at the X-10 Graphite Reactor describing the reactor's unique achievements. An interpretive panel titled "Graphite Reactor Firsts" Oak Ridge X-10: Graphite Reactor Design, Panel 2 A second exhibit panel at the X-10 Graphite Reactor describing the reactor's design. An interpretive panel titled "Graphite Reactor Design" Oak Ridge X-10: Graphite Reactor Design, Panel 1 An exhibit panel at the X-10 Graphite reactor describing the reactor's design. An interpretive panel titled "Graphite Reactor Design" Oak Ridge X-10: 1963- A National Landmark An exhibit panel at the X-10 Graphite Reactor describing the reactor becoming a National Historic Landmark. An interpretive panel titled "1963- A National Landmark" Oak Ridge X-10: 1946- Radioisotope Production An exhibit panel at the X-10 Graphite Reactor describing radioisotope production. An interpretive panel titled "1946- Radioisotope Production" Oak Ridge X-10: 1946- Neutron Science and Nuclear Power An exhibit panel at the X-10 Graphite Reactor describing postwar science. An interpretive panel titled "1946- Neutron Science and Nuclear Power" Oak Ridge: Y-12 Pilot Plant (Building 9731) Panoramic Tour Explore an interactive panoramic tour of the Y-12 Pilot Plant (Building 9731) in Oak Ridge, TN. Building 9731 was the pilot building where operations workers and cubicle operators trained to perform uranium separation. Their work yielded enriched uranium-235 to fuel Little Boy, the world’s first uranium gun-type atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima, Japan on August 6, 1945. Faded and dusty knobs and dials on a metal cubicle wall. B Reactor Atomic Culture Room: A Haiku for You This A Haiku for You exhibit panel is part of the Atomic Culture Room at the B Reactor. From Dr. Strangelove to the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, the nuclear age has and continues to influence popular culture. This Atomic Culture exhibit highlights just a few examples in cinema, literature, and music of how we collectively grapple with the profundity of the nuclear age. This article provides an image of the exhibit panel, text, and a detailed description of the panel. An exhibit panel with text, images, and a drawing of Godzilla. B Reactor Atomic Culture Room: Dr. Strangelove This Dr. Strangelove exhibit panel is part of the Atomic Culture Room at the B Reactor. From Dr. Strangelove to the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, the nuclear age has and continues to influence popular culture. This Atomic Culture exhibit highlights just a few examples in cinema, literature, and music of how we collectively grapple with the profundity of the nuclear age. This article provides an image of the exhibit panel, text, and a detailed description of the panel. An exhibit panel showing text and an up-close photo of a nuclear warhead. B Reactor Atomic Culture Room: Fallout This Fallout exhibit panel is part of the Atomic Culture Room at the B Reactor. From Doctor Strangelove to the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, the nuclear age has and continues to influence popular culture. This Atomic Culture exhibit highlights just a few examples in cinema, literature, and music of how we collectively grapple with the profundity of the nuclear age. This article provides an image of the exhibit panel, text, and a detailed description of the panel. An exhibit panel showing stylized images of a video game. B Reactor Atomic Culture Room: Godzilla This Godzilla exhibit panel is part of the Atomic Culture Room at the B Reactor. From Dr. Strangelove to the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, the nuclear age has and continues to influence popular culture. This Atomic Culture exhibit highlights just a few examples in cinema, literature, and music of how we collectively grapple with the profundity of the nuclear age. This article provides an image of the exhibit panel, text, and a detailed description of the panel. Tokyo, Japan skyscrapers with Godzilla peering out of them. B Reactor Atomic Culture Room: LBJ's Daisy Ad This LBJ Daisy Ad exhibit panel is part of the Atomic Culture Room at the B Reactor. From Doctor Strangelove to the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, the nuclear age has and continues to influence popular culture. This Atomic Culture exhibit highlights just a few examples in cinema, literature, and music of how we collectively grapple with the profundity of the nuclear age. This article provides an image of the exhibit panel, text, and a detailed description of the panel. An exhibit panel showing black and white images of a television ad. B Reactor Atomic Culture Room: Pilot Lights of the Apocalypse An exhibit panel in the Atomic Culture Room describing theater influenced by the atomic age. From Dr. Strangelove to the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, the nuclear age has and continues to influence popular culture. This Atomic Culture exhibit highlights just a few examples in cinema, literature, and music of how we collectively grapple with the profundity of the nuclear age. This article provides an image of the exhibit panel, text, and a detailed description of the panel. An exhibit panel with text and gauges in the background. B Reactor Atomic Culture Room: The Blade of Grass in a Dreamless Field This Blade of Grass in a Dreamless Field exhibit panel is part of the Atomic Culture Room at the B Reactor. From Dr. Strangelove to the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, the nuclear age has and continues to influence popular culture. This Atomic Culture exhibit highlights just a few examples in cinema, literature, and music of how we collectively grapple with the profundity of the nuclear age. This article provides an image of the panel, text, and description of the panel. An exhibit panel with text and a blade of grass in a desert. B Reactor Atomic Culture Room: The Simpsons This Simpson exhibit panel is part of the Atomic Culture Room at the B Reactor. From Doctor Strangelove to the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, the nuclear age has and continues to influence popular culture. This Atomic Culture exhibit highlights just a few examples in cinema, literature, and music of how we collectively grapple with the profundity of the nuclear age. This article provides an image of the exhibit panel, text, and a detailed description of the panel. An exhibit panel showing art and text from the Simpsons cartoon. B Reactor Health Physics Exhibit: An Order for Safety The An Order for Safety panel is part of the Health Physics Exhibit at the B Reactor. This exhibit explores the development of health physics, which is the science of protecting people and the environment from the potential harmful effects of radiation. The Manhattan Project introduced a new work-place hazard: radiation. Safety controls needed to be developed to ensure the safety of radiation workers. This article provides an image of the exhibit panel, text, and description. An exhibit panel with text and images of people in safety gear. B Reactor Health Physics Exhibit: Health Physics The Health Physics panel is part of the Health Physics Exhibit at the B Reactor. This exhibit explores the development of health physics, which is the science of protecting people and the environment from the potential harmful effects of radiation. The Manhattan Project introduced a new work-place hazard: radiation. Safety controls needed to be developed to ensure the safety of radiation workers. This article provides an image of the exhibit panel, text, and a description. Five men in lab coats are featured prominently on the exhibit panel. B Reactor Health Physics Exhibit: Laundry Day The Laundry Day panel is part of the Health Physics Exhibit at the B Reactor. This exhibit explores the development of health physics, which is the science of protecting people and the environment from the potential harmful effects of radiation. The Manhattan Project introduced a new work-place hazard: radiation. Safety controls needed to be developed to ensure the safety of radiation workers. This article provides an image of the exhibit panel, text, and a description. An exhibit panel showing text and people washing and sorting large amounts of protective clothing. B Reactor Health Physics Exhibit: Learning From the Past for a Safe Future The Learning From the Past panel is part of the Health Physics Exhibit at the B Reactor. This exhibit explores the development of health physics, which is the science of protecting people and the environment from the potential harmful effects of radiation. The Manhattan Project introduced a new work-place hazard: radiation. Safety controls needed to be developed to ensure the safety of radiation workers. This article provides an image of the panel, text, and a description. An exhibit panel showing text and men donning white protective suits. B Reactor Health Physics Exhibit: Painted Warnings The Painted Warnings panel is part of the Health Physics Exhibit at the B Reactor. This exhibit explores the development of health physics, which is the science of protecting people and the environment from the potential harmful effects of radiation. The Manhattan Project introduced a new work-place hazard: radiation. Safety controls needed to be developed to ensure the safety of radiation workers. This article provides an image of the exhibit panel, text, and a description. An exhibit panel showing text, photos, and warning signs. B Reactor Health Physics Exhibit: Time, Distance & Shielding The Time, Distance, and Shielding panel is part of the Health Physics Exhibit at the B Reactor. This exhibit explores the development of health physics, which is the science of protecting people and the environment from the potential harmful effects of radiation. The Manhattan Project introduced a new work-place hazard: radiation. Safety controls needed to be developed to ensure the safety of radiation workers. This provides an image of the panel, text, and description. An exhibit panel showing text and a man in protective gear in the snow. B Reactor Health Physics Exhibit: What is Your Size? The What is Your Size panel is part of the Health Physics Exhibit at the B Reactor. This exhibit explores the development of health physics, which is the science of protecting people and the environment from the potential harmful effects of radiation. The Manhattan Project introduced a new work-place hazard: radiation. Safety controls needed to be developed to ensure the safety of radiation workers. This article provides an image of the exhibit panel, text, and a description. An exhibit panel with text and a chart showing color-coded clothing sizes. B Reactor Health Physics Exhibit: Where's My Cutie Pie? The Where’s My Cutie Pie? panel is part of the Health Physics Exhibit at the B Reactor. This exhibit explores the development of health physics, which is the science of protecting people and the environment from the potential harmful effects of radiation. The Manhattan Project introduced a new work-place hazard: radiation. Safety controls needed to be developed to ensure the safety of radiation workers. This article provides an image of the panel, text, and description. An exhibit panel with text and images of men in white hazmat suits. B Reactor Health Physics Exhibit: You Named It What? The You Named It What? panel is part of the Health Physics Exhibit at the B Reactor. This exhibit explores the development of health physics, which is the science of protecting people and the environment from the potential harmful effects of radiation. The Manhattan Project introduced a new work-place hazard: radiation. Safety controls needed to be developed to ensure the safety of radiation workers. This article provides an image of the panel, text, and a description. An exhibit panel with text showing a chart of equipment names. B Reactor Atomic Culture Room: Hiroshima This Hiroshima exhibit panel is part of the Atomic Culture Room at the B Reactor. From Dr. Strangelove to the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, the nuclear age has and continues to influence popular culture. This Atomic Culture exhibit highlights just a few examples in cinema, literature, and music of how we collectively grapple with the profundity of the nuclear age. This article provides an image of the exhibit panel, text, and a detailed description of the panel. An exhibit panel showing text and the cover of a book. B Reactor Atomic Culture Room: Alas, Babylon This Alas Babylon exhibit panel is part of the Atomic Culture Room at the B Reactor. From Dr. Strangelove to the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, the nuclear age has and continues to influence popular culture. This Atomic Culture exhibit highlights just a few examples in cinema, literature, and music of how we collectively grapple with the profundity of the nuclear age. This article provides an image of the exhibit panel, text, and a detailed description of the panel. An exhibit panel with text and a stylized image of a destroyed cityscape. B Reactor Atomic Culture Room: Nuclear Songs This Nuclear Songs exhibit panel is part of the Atomic Culture Room at the B Reactor. From Dr. Strangelove to the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, the nuclear age has and continues to influence popular culture. This Atomic Culture exhibit highlights just a few examples in cinema, literature, and music of how we collectively grapple with the profundity of the nuclear age. This article provides an image of the exhibit panel, text, and a detailed description of the panel. An exhibit panel with lists of songs and images of records. B Reactor History Room: Nuclear Arms Treaties This Nuclear Arms Treaties exhibit panel is part of the History Room at the B Reactor. The History Room exhibits guide readers through a timeline of the scientific discoveries that led to the nuclear age and the historical events that made the Manhattan Project one of the most consequential events of the last century. The exhibits are intended to prompt personal thoughts and reflections. This article provides an image of the exhibit panel, text, and a detailed description. Time magazine cover with illustrations of a dozen or so missiles of varying shapes and designs. B Reactor History Room: Little Joe This Little Joe exhibit panel is part of the History Room at the B Reactor. The History Room exhibits guide readers through a timeline of the scientific discoveries that led to the nuclear age and the historical events that made the Manhattan Project one of the most consequential events of the last century. The exhibits are intended to prompt personal thoughts and reflections. This article provides an image of the exhibit panel, text, and a detailed description. A large, black headline in all capital letters reads, “USSR Possesses Atom Bomb.” B Reactor History Room: Limited Test Ban Treaty This Limited Test Ban Treaty exhibit panel is part of the History Room at the B Reactor. The History Room exhibits guide readers through a timeline of the scientific discoveries that led to the nuclear age and the historical events that made the Manhattan Project one of the most consequential events of the last century. The exhibits are intended to prompt personal thoughts and reflections. This article provides an image of the exhibit panel, text, and a detailed description. A handwritten letter to the Chief of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, dated March 17, 1954. B Reactor History Room: Hanford & the B Reactor This Hanford & The B Reactor exhibit panel is part of the History Room at the B Reactor. The History Room exhibits guide readers through a timeline of the scientific discoveries that led to the nuclear age and the historical events that made the Manhattan Project one of the most consequential events of the last century. The exhibits are intended to prompt personal thoughts and reflections. This article provides an image of the exhibit panel, text, and a detailed description. An aerial photograph of Hanford shows numerous industrial buildings and support facilities. B Reactor History Room: Fall of the Berlin Wall This Fall of the Berlin Wall exhibit panel is part of the History Room at the B Reactor. The History Room exhibits guide readers through a timeline of the scientific discoveries that led to the nuclear age and the historical events that made the Manhattan Project one of the most consequential events of the last century. The exhibits are intended to prompt personal thoughts and reflections. This article provides an image of the exhibit panel, text, and a detailed description. A Time magazine cover from showing a group of young men standing and sitting atop the Berlin Wall. B Reactor History Room: End of WWII This End of World War II exhibit panel is part of the History Room at the B Reactor. The History Room exhibits guide readers through a timeline of the scientific discoveries that led to the nuclear age and the historical events that made the Manhattan Project one of the most consequential events of the last century. The exhibits are intended to prompt personal thoughts and reflections. This article provides an image of the exhibit panel, text, and a detailed description. Religious statues in an otherwise undistinguishable pile of rubble.  B Reactor History Room: Notable Nuclear Power Plant Accidents This Notable Nuclear Power Plant Accidents exhibit panel is part of the History Room at the B Reactor. The History Room exhibits guide readers through a timeline of the scientific discoveries that led to the nuclear age and the historical events that made the Manhattan Project one of the most consequential events of the last century. The exhibits are intended to prompt personal thoughts and reflections. This article provides an image of the exhibit panel, text, description. A man and woman standing outside a nuclear power plant cooling tower. B Reactor History Room: Trinity Test This Trinity Text exhibit panel is part of the History Room at the B Reactor. The History Room exhibits guide readers through a timeline of the scientific discoveries that led to the nuclear age and the historical events that made the Manhattan Project one of the most consequential events of the last century. The exhibits are intended to prompt personal thoughts and reflections. This article provides an image of the exhibit panel, text, and a detailed description. An enormous mushroom cloud rises from an otherwise totally flat, barren landscape. B Reactor History Room: Discovery of the Neutron This Discovery of the Neutron exhibit panel is part of the History Room at the B Reactor. The History Room exhibits guide readers through a timeline of the scientific discoveries that led to the nuclear age and the historical events that made the Manhattan Project one of the most consequential events of the last century. The exhibits are intended to prompt personal thoughts and reflections. This article provides an image of the panel, text, and a detailed description. A slim man sits across from a larger man. B Reactor History Room: Nuclear Fission This Nuclear Fission exhibit panel is part of the History Room at the B Reactor. The History Room exhibits guide readers through a timeline of the scientific discoveries that led to the nuclear age and the historical events that made the Manhattan Project one of the most consequential events of the last century. The exhibits are intended to prompt personal thoughts and reflections. This article provides an image of the exhibit panel, text, and a detailed description. A photograph of a middle-aged woman seated in a white lab coat before a laboratory table. B Reactor History Room: Cuban Missile Crisis This Cuban Missile Crisis exhibit panel is part of the History Room at the B Reactor. The History Room exhibits guide readers through a timeline of the scientific discoveries that led to the nuclear age and the historical events that made the Manhattan Project one of the most consequential events of the last century. The exhibits are intended to prompt personal thoughts and reflections. This article provides an image of the exhibit panel, text, and a detailed description. An exhibit panel with text and an aerial map. B Reactor History Room: The Manhattan Project This Manhattan Project exhibit panel is part of the History Room at the B Reactor. The History Room exhibits guide readers through a timeline of the scientific discoveries that led to the nuclear age and the historical events that made the Manhattan Project one of the most consequential events of the last century. The exhibits are intended to prompt personal thoughts and reflections. This article provides an image of the exhibit panel, text, and a detailed description. The “Fat Man” bomb sitting on a rolling trailer at an assembly building on Tinian Island. B Reactor History Room: Synthesis of Plutonium This Synthesis of Plutonium exhibit panel is part of the History Room at the B Reactor. The History Room exhibits guide readers through a timeline of the scientific discoveries that led to the nuclear age and the historical events that made the Manhattan Project one of the most consequential events of the last century. The exhibits are intended to prompt personal thoughts and reflections. This article provides an image of the exhibit panel, text, and a detailed description. A man in a long-sleeved white shirt and tie leaning over a piece of electronic equipment. B Reactor History Room: Slow Neutrons This Slow Neutrons exhibit panel is part of the History Room at the B Reactor. The History Room exhibits guide readers through a timeline of the scientific discoveries that led to the nuclear age and the historical events that made the Manhattan Project one of the most consequential events of the last century. The exhibits are intended to prompt personal thoughts and reflections. This article provides an image of the exhibit panel, text, and a detailed description. A balding man in a tweed jacket drawing at a blackboard with math equations above. B Reactor History Room: Secrecy to Transparency This Secrecy to Transparency exhibit panel is part of the History Room at the B Reactor. The History Room exhibits guide readers through a timeline of the scientific discoveries that led to the nuclear age and the historical events that made the Manhattan Project one of the most consequential events of the last century. The exhibits are intended to prompt personal thoughts and reflections. This article provides an image of the exhibit panel, text, and a detailed description. Composite of several images of people sitting at desks in large meeting rooms. B Reactor History Room: Scientific Curiosity This Scientific Curiosity exhibit panel is part of the History Room at the B Reactor. The History Room exhibits guide readers through a timeline of the scientific discoveries that led to the nuclear age and the historical events that made the Manhattan Project one of the most consequential events of the last century. The exhibits are intended to prompt personal thoughts and reflections. This article provides an image of the exhibit panel, text, and a detailed description. A man lecturing in front of an equation-filled chalkboard. B Reactor History Room: Pearl Harbor This Pearl Harbor exhibit panel is part of the History Room at the B Reactor. The History Room exhibits guide readers through a timeline of the scientific discoveries that led to the nuclear age and the historical events that made the Manhattan Project one of the most consequential events of the last century. The exhibits are intended to prompt personal thoughts and reflections. This article provides an image of the exhibit panel, text, and a detailed description. The USS Arizona badly mangled and listing, engulfed in smoke and flames. B Reactor History Room: The Nuclear Age This Nuclear Age exhibit panel is part of the History Room at the B Reactor. The History Room exhibits guide readers through a timeline of the scientific discoveries that led to the nuclear age and the historical events that made the Manhattan Project one of the most consequential events of the last century. The exhibits are intended to prompt personal thoughts and reflections. This article provides an image of the exhibit panel, text, and a detailed description of the panel. An exhibit panel with text and an image of a damaged concrete dome. B Reactor History Room: A Postcard to the Future This Postcard to the Future exhibit panel is part of the History Room at the B Reactor. The History Room exhibits guide readers through a timeline of the scientific discoveries that led to the nuclear age and the historical events that made the Manhattan Project one of the most consequential events of the last century. The exhibits are intended to prompt personal thoughts and reflections. This article provides an image of the exhibit panel, text, and a description. An exhibit panel with an image of a postcard. B Reactor History Room: Hard Decisions This Hard Decisions exhibit panel is part of the History Room at the B Reactor. The History Room exhibits guide readers through a timeline of the scientific discoveries that led to the nuclear age and the historical events that made the Manhattan Project one of the most consequential events of the last century. The exhibits are intended to prompt personal thoughts and reflections. This article provides an image of the exhibit panel, text, and a description of the panel. An exhibit panel with text and a man in a suit standing at a podium surrounded by people. Hanford: B Reactor Panoramic Tour The B Reactor on the Hanford Site in south-eastern Washington state is the first full-scale nuclear production reactor in the world. At the height of the Manhattan Project, over 45,000 people from all walks of life and all 48 states worked at the Hanford Site. While many of the workers did not know their mission, their combined efforts proved that plutonium could be produced on an industrial scale. A large reactor building with blue sky and thin white clouds above it. Hanford: T Plant Panoramic Tour Built during the Manhattan Project, Hanford’s T Plant was the first separations plant in the world constructed to chemically separate radioactive materials. Much of the separations work was done remotely to protect workers from the tremendous amount of radiation given off by the irradiated uranium fuel slugs. Separating a man-made material from a highly radioactive fuel slug at an industrial scale had never been done before. A large rectangular sign on a concrete building reads "T Plant" on a blue background. Hanford Downwinders: Trisha Thompson Pritikin Trisha Pritikin is a lawyer, writer, mother, downwinder, and most of all, an ardent activist. She served on the Hanford Health Effects Subcommittee (HHES), run by the federal Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). She has demanded accountability from federal agencies addressing civilian downwinder issues, including the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), The National Academy of Science (NAS), and the National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH). A women is seated resting elbows on knees and hands interlaced in front of chin looks at the camera
Manhattan Project National Historical Park Oak Ridge, Tennessee National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior 2020 Edition Official Visitor Guide Welcome to Manhattan Project National Historical Park. This guide is designed to provide information about how to make the most of your visit to the park. The Children’s Museum of Oak Ridge is a great place to start your adventure. There you can speak to a park ranger for information on the latest events and activities. You can pick up our visitor guide and map to help navigate the many historic sites of Oak Ridge. Be sure to stamp your NPS passport book while you’re there. The park provides free year-round ranger-led programs at various locations across the city. Programs include informative talks at the Gatehouse, bike rides around the city, and hikes through the historic district. For more information about upcoming ranger-led programs, call (865)482-1942. Often referred to as “the nation’s storytellers,”National Park Service staff work to bring you the stories that make the Oak Ridge so special. Walk or bike to cemeteries and churches which tell the stories of the farmers and store owners who lived here before the Manhattan Project. Take the bus tour to see Y-12 New Hope Center, X-10 and K-25 Complexes, drive by the original houses and eat lunch at historic Jackson Square to learn about the soldiers, scientists and construction workers who built the “Secret City.” Visit the American Museum of Science and Energy or ring the International Friendship Bell to see what current residents are doing to lead Oak Ridge into the future. Welcome to the Manhattan Project National Historical Park With three sites located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Los Alamos, New Mexico; and Hanford, Washington, this far-reaching park tells the story of the people, events, science, and engineering that led to the creation of the atomic bomb, which helped end World War II. JAPANESE FOREIGN AFFAIRS MINISTER MAMORU SHIGEMITSU SIGNS INSTRUMENT OF SURRENDER ON USS MISSOURI AS GEN. RICHARD K. SUTHERLAND WATCHES, SEPTEMBER 2, 1945. Manhattan Project National Historical Park is unique in another way as the National Park Service is in partnership with the Children’s Museum of Oak Ridge (CMOR) to help tell this powerful story. Together, we look forward to presenting more information about the many people who worked to create the atomic bomb, which helped bring an end to World War II. As you explore the Oak Ridge site, please look for information about the people who were instrumental in the Manhattan Project. Their contributions and efforts to end World War II are thought-provoking and inspirational. It took many people from all walks of life to make this all become an integral part of America’s history. ALLIED PERSONNEL CELEBRATE JAPANESE SURRENDER IN PARIS. Manhattan Project NHP at Oak Ridge is one of three National Park Service sites where the atomic bomb was developed. We encourage you to visit the other Manhattan Project NHP sites in Hanford, Washington; and Los Alamos, New Mexico. In addition to Manhattan Project NHP, there are 12 other National Park Service units located in Tennessee. Each of these special places share a unique story, preserves a part of our collective history, or offers an opportunity to view incredible landscapes. We encourage you to make time to discover these places for yourself. As you “Find Your Park” and discover what these places mean to you, whether it’s the history of the Manhattan Project, or a large natural area like the Big South Fork National River & Recreation Area, take a moment to think about what makes these places so special. If you have questions, please contact either a park ranger or one of the staff at CMOR. They are there to help you discover the history, significance, and importance of this site. We hope you enjoy your visit and will continue to come back to see the growth and development of the Manhattan Project National Historical Park. MANHATTAN PROJECT PIN - (1945-1950). PRESENTED TO INDIVIDUALS WHO WORKED ON THE MANHATTAN PROJECT. BRONZE WAS ISSUED TO INDIVIDUALS WITH UNDER 1 YEAR SERVICE, AND SILVER TO THOSE WITH OVER 1 YEAR OF SERVICE. National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Manhattan Project National Historical Park Mailing Address 461 W. Outer Drive Oak Ridge, TN 37830 E-mail mapr_information@nps.gov Park Visitor Desk (865) 482-1942 STAY CONNECTED WITH US Follow us on Twitter @MnhtnProjectNPS Like us on Facebook as ManhattanProjectNPS Follow us on Instagram as ManhattanProjectNPS Subscribe to our YouTube channel Manhattan Project National Historical Park The National Park Service cares for the special places saved by the American people so that all may experience our heritage. Lost & Found Report any lost items to rangers at the Children’s Museum of Oak Ridge located at 461 W. Outer Drive, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Found items should be turned in at this location as well. The 75th Anniversary of V-J Day The Ye

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