by Alex Gugel , all rights reserved

Lake Mead

National Recreation Area - AZ, NV

Lake Mead is the largest reservoir in the United States in terms of water capacity. The reservoir serves water to the states of Arizona, California, and Nevada, providing sustenance to nearly 20 million people and large areas of farmland.

location

maps

Official visitor map of Lake Mead National Recreation Area (NRA) in Arizona and Nevada. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Lake Mead - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Lake Mead National Recreation Area (NRA) in Arizona and Nevada. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the Northern part of BLM Kingman Field Office area in Arizona. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Kingman - North

Map of the Northern part of BLM Kingman Field Office area in Arizona. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Map of the Southern part of BLM Kingman Field Office area in Arizona. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Kingman - South

Map of the Southern part of BLM Kingman Field Office area in Arizona. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Mohave County Map of Arizona Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Arizona State Land Department and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM).AZ Surface Management Responsibility - Mohave County

Mohave County Map of Arizona Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Arizona State Land Department and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Statewide Map of Arizona Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Arizona State Land Department and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM).AZ Surface Management Responsibility - Arizona State

Statewide Map of Arizona Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Arizona State Land Department and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Map of Recreation and Historic Sites on Federal, State and Tribal Land in Arizona. Published by visitarizona.com.Arizona State - Arizona Tourism Map

Map of Recreation and Historic Sites on Federal, State and Tribal Land in Arizona. Published by visitarizona.com.

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails Map of Lincoln County in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.Lincoln County - OHV Trails

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails Map of Lincoln County in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails Map of Coyote Springs in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.Coyote Springs - OHV Trails

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails Map of Coyote Springs in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails Map of Boulder City Conservation Easement (BCCE) in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.Boulder City - Conservation Easement

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails Map of Boulder City Conservation Easement (BCCE) in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails Map of Gold Butte Backcountry Byway in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.Gold Butte - OHV Trails

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails Map of Gold Butte Backcountry Byway in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails Map of Bitter Springs Backcountry Byway in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.Bitter Springs - Backcountry Byway

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails Map of Bitter Springs Backcountry Byway in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails Map of Jean and Roach Dry Lake Beds Dispersed OHV Recreation Area in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.Jean and Roach Dry Lake Beds - Dispersed OHV Recreation Area Trails

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails Map of Jean and Roach Dry Lake Beds Dispersed OHV Recreation Area in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails Map of Crescent Peak Motocross Race Routes in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.Crescent Peak - Motocross Race Routes

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails Map of Crescent Peak Motocross Race Routes in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails Map of Southern Clark County in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.Clark County - South OHV Trails

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails Map of Southern Clark County in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails Map of Nellis Dunes in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.Nellis Dunes - OHV Trails

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails Map of Nellis Dunes in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails Map of Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area (NCA) in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.Red Rock Canyon - OHV Trails

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails Map of Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area (NCA) in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails Map of Logandale in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.Logandale - OHV Trails

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails Map of Logandale in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails Map of Mormon Mesa in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.Mormon Mesa - OHV Trails

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails Map of Mormon Mesa in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails Map of North East Clark County in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.Clark County - North East OHV Trails

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails Map of North East Clark County in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.

Statewide Map of Nevada Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Nevada State - Surface Management Responsibility

Statewide Map of Nevada Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Official Highway Map of Nevada. Published by the Nevada Department of Transportation.Nevada State - Highway Map

Official Highway Map of Nevada. Published by the Nevada Department of Transportation.

https://www.nps.gov/lake https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lake_Mead_National_Recreation_Area Lake Mead is the largest reservoir in the United States in terms of water capacity. The reservoir serves water to the states of Arizona, California, and Nevada, providing sustenance to nearly 20 million people and large areas of farmland. Swim, boat, hike, cycle, camp and fish at America’s first and largest national recreation area. With striking landscapes and brilliant blue waters, this year-round playground spreads across 1.5 million acres of mountains, canyons, valleys and two vast lakes. See the Hoover Dam from the waters of Lake Mead or Lake Mohave, or find solitude in one of the park's nine wilderness areas. By car you can drive to one of the park's many entrances. The six main entrances to Lake Mead are as follows: Northshore, Lake Mead Boulevard, Lake Mead Parkway, and Boulder, Temple Bar and Meadview. For the southern sections of the park, near Lake Mohave, there are entrance stations at Willow Beach, Katherine Landing and Cottonwood Cove. Lake Mead Headquarters Information Kiosk An information kiosk is located inside Lake Mead's Headquarters building. Lake Mead Visitor Center Before you start your adventure, stop by the Lake Mead Visitor Center. Whether you have one hour or one week, rangers and volunteers will help you plan an unforgettable trip. In addition to grabbing maps and brochures, you can get your National Park passport stamp or become a junior ranger. The Western National Parks Association operates the park store from within the center. It's stocked with books about the park and the region, Native American arts, jewelry and crafts, posters, outerwear and more. From Boulder City take U.S. Highway 93 south to Lakeshore Road. Turn left onto Lakeshore Road and the visitor center will be on your right in approximately 1/4 mile. Boulder Beach Campground (Lake Mead) The Boulder Beach Campground is located just minutes from Las Vegas along the Boulder Basin of Lake Mead. It’s open year-round and features large paved sites that can accommodate tents or large RVs, along with tables, fire pits and/or grills. These sites are like an oasis, because of the lush vegetation that shades nearly every campsite. There is a mix of palm trees, oleanders, mature cottonwood trees and native vegetation that also helps provide privacy between sites. Campsite Fees 20.00 NPS-managed campground fees are $20 per site ($10 with the Interagency Senior and Access passes) and are payable immediately upon occupying a campsite. Fees are posted at the entrance to the campground. Sites are available on a first-come, first-served basis. There are no reservations. Check-out time is noon. For more information about camping, please visit our Camping Page. Boulder Beach Campgrounds Desert landscape with campsites and two rv's. Boulder Beach Campground Boulder Beach Campgrounds Campsite with desert trees and a lake in the background. Boulder Boulder Beach Group Campground (Lake Mead) When you stay at the Boulder Beach Group Campground, you’ll have access to many recreation opportunities. Boulder Beach, Special Events Beach, Canoe/Kayak Beach and PWC Beach are 1-2 miles away. At these locations you can swim, kayak and jetski. If you prefer to explore the park on land, the River Mountains Loop Trail passes right by the campground. This paved trail is more than 30 miles long and leads to the Historic Railroad Trail. Group sites 80.00 Group campsites fees are $80 per night (15 person minimum - 30 person maximum per site) are located at the Boulder Campground. Camping fees are posted at the campground kiosk. Reservations are required and can be requested online only at rec.gov. Boulder Beach Group Campground Shady campsite in the desert. Boulder Beach Group Campground Callville Bay Campground (Lake Mead) When you stay at Callville Bay Campground, you can enjoy the area on land or on water. A nearby shaded picnic area has cool grass, grills, restrooms and panels explaining the history of the area. Across the street, you’ll find the trailhead to the Callville Summit Trail. This 2.7-mile moderate hike requires a short climb, but yields a spectacular view of Lake Mead, Fortification Hill, the Hemenway Valley and the River Mountains. Callville Bay Camping sites fee 20.00 Campground fees are $20 per site ($10 with the Interagency Senior and Access passes) and are payable immediately upon occupying a campsite. Open/unreserved sites are available on a first-come, first-served basis. The campground has a 1-person minimum/8-person maximum per site and one camping unit, i.e., motor home or camp trailer. A maximum of two motorized vehicles, four motorcycles or combination thereof if towed or carried by camper. Callville Bay Tent Camping/picnicking site Photo of a picnic table and fire ring in a cleared area for tent camping with trees. Callville Bay Campground Restrooms Restroom facilities at Callville Bay Campground Callville Bay Campground Access Photo of paved drive around the campsites at Callville Bay Campground Callville Bay RV Park (Lake Mead) More than 550 miles of pristine shoreline. Soaring red rock cliffs. Countless bays and beaches. Get off the grid for the vacation of a lifetime at Callville Bay Resort & Marina on Lake Mead. Conveniently located within an hour of Las Vegas, Nevada, Callville Bay offers an ideal getaway perfectly complemented by infinite opportunities for adventure and entertainment. Personal watercraft and ski boat rentals are available for a fun-filled day trip, along with multiple houseboat rental options. RV Park looking west RV's sit in an open lot Views from around Callville Bay RV Park RV Park laundry and restrooms A restroom and laundry facility Views from around Callville Bay RV Park RV Park laundry machines A set of washers and dryers inside a laundry facility Views from around Callville Bay RV Park RV Park spaces A RV sits parked in an open RV lot Views from around Callville Bay RV Park RV Park Entrance View looking at a palm tree and entrance station Views from around Callville Bay RV Park Cottonwood Cove Campground (Lake Mohave) Cottonwood Campground is located near Searchlight, Nevada, along Lake Mohave. It’s open year-round and features paved sites that can accommodate tents or RVs, along with tables, fire pits and/or grills. Restrooms and water spigots are located throughout the campsite. Temperatures usually surpass 100F (37C) degrees June-August. In May and September, daytime highs are around 90F (32C). October-April, temperatures are much cooler. Lows can dip to freezing temps December-February. The area averages 4 inch Cottonwood Campground Campground with lake and marina in background. Cottonwood Campground Cottonwood Cove RV Park (Lake Mead) Cottonwood Cove Resort & Marina at Lake Mohave is a premier destination for houseboat rentals, watercraft rentals, camping and includes a spacious rv park. We are conveniently located on the Colorado River and just a short drive from Laughlin, Nevada. Our resort and marina have lakeside accommodations, a full-service rv park, nearby campground facilities and a variety of boat rentals. Visit us at Lake Mohave and experience the getaway of a lifetime. Cottonwood Cove RV Park RV sit lined up View of Cottonwood Cove RV Park Echo Bay Campground (Lake Mead) Our Echo Bay Park is a fisherman’s and boater’s paradise. Located on the north end of Lake Mead, this secluded park offers a variety of outdoor activities. Close to the “must-see” wonder of the Valley of Fire State Park and the ruins of the historic town of St. Thomas, visitors have an array of hiking and sightseeing opportunities. The large RV sites provide room for your boat, and the free on-site launch ramp are ideal for boaters. Campsite Fees 20.00 Campground fees are $20 per site ($10 with the Interagency Senior and Access passes) and are payable immediately upon occupying a campsite. Fees are posted at the entrance to the campground. Sites managed by the National Park Service are available on a first-come, first-served basis. There are no reservations. Check-out time is noon. Echo Bay Campgrounds Campsite with desert trees and a picnic table. Echo Bay Campground Echo Bay RV Park (Lake Mead) Echo Bay Park is a fisherman’s and boater’s paradise. Located on the north end of Lake Mead, this secluded park offers a variety of outdoor activities. Close to the “must-see” wonder of the Valley of Fire State Park and the ruins of the historic town of St. Thomas, visitors have an array of hiking and sightseeing opportunities. The large RV sites provide room for your boat, and the free on-site launch ramp are ideal for boaters. Enjoy camping at the Echo Bay RV Village! Whether you stay a night or a mon Echo Bay RV Park RV's lined up in a lot View of Echo Bay RV Park Katherine Landing Campground (Lake Mohave) With views of the lake and within walking distance of the marina, swim beach, dining and retail store, campsites at Katherine Landing feature a wide array of amenities including concrete picnic tables, fire rings with cooking grills, modern restrooms, showers, with laundry facilities close by. Wi-fi access through Access Parks is available. Campsites at Katherine Landing offer guests a scenic, affordable basecamp for adventures on and around beautiful Lake Mohave. Katherine Landing Campground A campsite with a table and palm trees View from Katherine Landing Campground Katherine Landing RV Park (Lake Mohave) The Katherine Landing RV campsites come complete with water, sewer and electrical hook-ups. All spaces have the option of household current, 30 amp, or 50 amp power. Laundry, restroom and shower facilities are available on site. All spaces are back-in with the largest space accommodating a 40′ RV. For a Lake Mohave camping adventure in the comfort of your own rig, the RV campsites at Katherine Landing offer all the connections you need! Katherine Landing RV Park A RV park View from Katherine Landing RV Park Lake Mead RV Village (Lake Mead) Lake Mead's Boulder Beach area offers many things to see and do. Whether you’d rather go sightseeing, tour Hoover Dam, go shopping, visit historic Boulder City or try your luck in Las Vegas, Lake Mead RV Village at Boulder Beach is conveniently located to a variety of attractions. There’s a lot going on around Lake Mead RV Village, so set up camp and discover this diverse and historically significant area, while enjoying your stay on the shores of Lake Mead. Lake Mead RV Village RV Village Lake Mead RV Village Callville Bay RV Park Callville Bay RV Park Callville Bay RV Park Las Vegas Bay Campground (Lake Mead) Las Vegas Bay Campground is located just minutes from Las Vegas on the western edge of the park and has lush vegetation that shades nearly every campsite. There is a mix of palm trees, oleanders, mature cottonwood trees and native vegetation that also helps provide privacy between sites. Wildlife in the area includes many species of birds and lizards along with antelope squirrels and the occasional coyote. Campsite Fees 20.00 Campground fees are $20 per site ($10 with the Interagency Senior and Access passes). Las Vegas Bay Campgrounds Desert landscape with campsites and bushes. Las Vegas Bay Campgrounds Temple Bar Campground (Lake Mead) Enjoy the Temple Bar area by land or water. Hike through the desert along the Temple View Trail to observe the crystal blue waters of Lake Mead and the natural temple that changes colors throughout the day. Launch your own boat or rent one from the marina. You can also dine at the seasonal cafe, or grab a variety of snacks, drinks and charcoal from the store. Campsite Fees 20.00 Campground fees are $20 per site ($10 with the Interagency Senior and Access passes). Temple Bar Campground Desert campground with a tent and vegetation. Temple Bar Campground Temple Bar RV Park (Lake Mead) Just 75 miles away from Las Vegas, Temple Bar Marina is located in the Temple Basin on the Arizona side of eastern Lake Mead. It’s the closest marina for Arizonans who want to get away from the more populated Boulder Basin area of Lake Mead. The RV Park at Temple Bar Marina is a perfect location for enjoying the lake and all its recreational activities. Temple Bar RV Park A road lined with palm trees on each side View of Temple Bar RV Park Willow Beach Campground (Lake Mohave) Willow Beach Campground offers 9 tent campground sites and is located just 30 minutes from Boulder City and 45 minutes from the Las Vegas strip. With its unique location, the park offers scenic views of the Colorado River, Black Canyon, as well as the mountain and desert landscapes in the distance. Enjoy a variety of water activities on Lake Mead and Lake Mohave, hike on the many trails in the recreation area, tour the Hoover Dam, or head to Las Vegas for some nightlife entertainment. Willow Beach Campground RV park A view of Willow Beach Campground Willow Beach RV Park Willow Beach RV Park is your full-service RV Park and tent campground located just 30 minutes from Boulder City and 45 minutes from the Las Vegas strip. With its unique location, the park offers scenic views of the Colorado River, Black Canyon, as well as the mountain and desert landscapes in the distance. Enjoy a variety of water activities on Lake Mead and Lake Mohave, hike on the many trails in the recreation area, tour the Hoover Dam, or head to Las Vegas for some nightlife entertainment. Willow Beach RV Park RV Park View of Willow Beach RV Park Black Canyon at Lake Mead NRA sun rising on Black Canyon Visit Black Canyon Water Trail for rafting or kayaking Redstone Picnic Area Lake Mead NRA picnic area at Redstone There are many picnic areas at Lake Mead NRA Boating at lakes Mead and Mohave power boaters on Lake Mead Boating is a popular activity at lakes Mead and Mohave Tour Operators Guide You through the Park people on a tour operated craft exploring the lake. There are many tour operators to provide you with an excellent visit to Lake Mead NRA. Bighorn Sheep Enjoying the View at Lake Mead NRA A group of bighorn sheep overlooking Lake Mead. With wilderness comes wildlife. Bighorn sheep can be spotted at most areas of the park. Wounded Veterans Find Healing At Lake Mead Wounded American Veterans Experience SCUBA Project, an organization that helps veterans overcome combat injuries through scuba diving. Just before Veterans Day, they teamed up with the National Park Service’s Submerged Resources Center to conduct their first dive within Lake Mead National Recreation Area. Six veterans prepare to dive into the water. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Lake Mead National Recreation Area, Nevada and Arizona Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] park road, lake, and mountians 2014 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2014 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards National Park Service Visitor and Resource Protection Staff Focuses on Week of Leadership Staff from all levels of the National Park Service in law enforcement, United States Park Police, as well as fire and aviation spent a week learning leadership lessons from one another as well as from a diverse group of leaders during the last week of September 2019. A group of women and men on a rocky outcrop in high desert. Partnerships between Resources and Fire Benefit Cultural Landscapes at Parashant National Monument Over the past several years, the fire program for Lake Mead National Recreation Area (LAKE) and Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument (PARA) has made strides in benefitting cultural and natural resources at both units. Firefighter protects a fence during a prescribed burn National Park Service Aviation Personnel Attend DOI National Pilot Ground School During the week of December 10, 2017, twenty-eight National Park Service (NPS) airplane and helicopter pilots, pilot trainees, national and regional aviation staff attended the 2017 DOI National Pilot Ground School (NPGS). The weeklong training brought together over 100 DOI pilots from the NPS, US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), Bureau of Land Management (BLM), and DOI’s Office of Aviation Services (OAS). A group of 17 men stand in front of a room. Veteran Story: Frank J. La Spina Before becoming a ranger at Lake Mead National Recreation Area Frank J. La Spina served honorably in the Marine Corps, Army and Nevada Army National Guard, medically retiring as an Army sergeant first class. soldier in kevlar by armored vehicle Lake Mead Lesson Plan Writing Retreat The Lesson Plan Writing Retreat invites educators to come together during the summer and to create culturally inclusive lesson plans through seminars and research. A group of people listen to a talk about plants Measuring light pollution across a landscape It takes a special camera to take a special picture—forty-five images in the case of a customized camera used by the National Park Service to document night sky quality. NPS scientists with the Natural Sounds and Night Skies Division (NSNSD) discussed the camera—how it works, what the images reveal, why it is important, and how it advances the NPS mission. Sweeping valley view from a mountain w/clouds and a female scientist installing the NPS camera. World War II Plane Crashes in National Parks During WWII, more than 7,100 air crashes involved US Army Air Force (USAAF) aircraft occurred on American soil. Collectively these crashes resulted in the loss of more than 15,599 lives (Mireles 2006). Many of these military aircraft accidents occurred in remote, often mountainous, areas managed by the National Park Service. plane crash at base of grassy hill Lake Mead National Recreation Area Hosts Latino Conservation Week July 15, Lake Mead National Recreation Area hosted volunteers for a Latino Conservation Week event called “Find Your Roots / Encuentra Tus Raíces.” The event served as an opportunity for participants to explore the park in a unique, educational and service-oriented way. cleaning native seeds Wounded Veterans Find Healing at Lake Mead National Recreation Area Six wounded veterans helped the National Park Service preserve the nation’s history and culture at Lake Mead National Recreation Area Nov. 7-9. At the same time, they found healing. National Park Service Finds Success at Hiring Event The National Park Service Fire and Aviation Program participated in a hiring event sponsored by the Department of Interior. The special hiring event was held in Bakersfield, CA and was a collaboration of all four natural resource management bureaus to hire open wildland fire positions in 2020. Employees talk to potential job candidates in front of a large promotional panel. How Lake Mead Stopped a Potent Invasive Plant Infestation Fountaingrass (Pennisetum setaceum) is an invasive ornamental species planted in several areas of the Southwest. When the staff at Lake Mead discovered the plant near remote mountain springs 12 miles upriver from the original plantings the Lake Mead Invasive Plant Management Team (LAKE IPMT) knew they had to hurry to prevent a dangerous fountaingrass infestation. Travis Fulton, LAKE IPMT, controlling fountain grass on a hillside at Joshua Tree National Park. Paleontology at Lake Mead National Recreation Area Lake Mead NRA is located a few miles east of Las Vegas, and serves as a welcome respite in the blazing heat of the Mojave desert summers. At the forefront of Lake Mead NRA’s conservational efforts are resource protection and education to visitors about the park’s desert wildlife, native fish and invasive species, and cultural history - far lesser known has been the park’s long and important paleontological story. 2 large dark wood logs laying in a rocky landscape Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display at a visitor center Series: NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Since 2002, the National Park Service (NPS) has awarded Environmental Achievement (EA) Awards to recognize staff and partners in the area of environmental preservation, protection and stewardship. A vehicle charges at an Electric Vehicle charging station at Thomas Edison National Historical Park Series: Park Paleontology News - Vol. 10, No. 1, Spring 2018 All across the park system, scientists, rangers, and interpreters are engaged in the important work of studying, protecting, and sharing our rich fossil heritage. <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/newsletters.htm">Park Paleontology News</a> provides a close up look at the important work of caring for these irreplaceable resources. <ul><li>Contribute to Park Paleontology News by contacting the <a href="https://www.nps.gov/common/utilities/sendmail/sendemail.cfm?o=5D8CD5B898DDBB8387BA1DBBFD02A8AE4FBD489F4FF88B9049&r=/subjects/geoscientistsinparks/photo-galleries.htm">newsletter editor</a></li><li>Learn more about <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/">Fossils & Paleontology</a> </li><li>Celebrate <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossilday/">National Fossil Day</a> with events across the nation</li></ul> a piece of rock with small reddish shells embedded in it with black and white rule in foreground Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Neogene Period—23.0 to 2.58 MYA Some of the finest Neogene fossils on the planet are found in the rocks of Agate Fossil Beds and Hagerman Fossil Beds national monuments. fossils on display in a visitor center Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display in a visitor center Erma Ouida Godbey Erma Ouida Godbey’s life exemplifies women’s experiences of and contributions to the Depression-era origins of Lake Mead and urban Nevada. woman looks away from camera, smiling at child and surrounded by family standing in large metal pipe Find Your Park on Route 66 Route 66 and the National Park Service have always had an important historical connection. Route 66 was known as the great road west and after World War II families on vacation took to the road in great numbers to visit the many National Park Service sites in the Southwest and beyond. That connection remains very alive and present today. Take a trip down Route 66 and Find Your Park today! A paved road with fields in the distance. On the road is a white Oklahoma Route 66 emblem. Changing Patterns of Water Availability May Change Vegetation Composition in US National Parks Across the US, changes in water availability are altering which plants grow where. These changes are evident at a broad scale. But not all areas experience the same climate in the same way, even within the boundaries of a single national park. A new dataset gives park managers a valuable tool for understanding why vegetation has changed and how it might change in the future under different climate-change scenarios. Green, orange, and dead grey junipers in red soil, mountains in background Cinder Cones Cinder cones are typically simple volcanoes that consist of accumulations of ash and cinders around a vent. Sunset Crater Volcano and Capulin Volcano are cinder cones. photo of a dry grassy field with a cinder cone in the distance Volcanic Inverted Topography Inverted topography arises when lava flows that filled valleys at the time of their eruption later hold up mesas because their resistance to erosion is greater than most other rock types. photo of volcanic rock with petroglyphs and a distant mesa Series: Volcano Types Volcanoes vary in size from small cinder cones that stand only a few hundred feet tall to the most massive mountains on earth. photo of a volcanic mountain with snow and ice Monogenetic Volcanic Fields Monogenetic volcanic fields are areas covered by volcanic rocks where each of the volcanic vents typically only erupt once. Monogenetic volcanic fields typically contain cinder cones, fissure volcanoes, and/or maars and tuff rings. They also usually encompass large areas covered by basaltic lava flows. oblique aerial photo of a lava flow that extended into a body of water Lodge Resort Complex in Lake Mead National Recreation Area to be Demolished through GAOA Funding This $1.112 million project will demolish the remaining components of the Lake Mead Lodge at Boulder Beach to eliminate safety risks to visitors and park staff. Additionally, it will rehabilitate the natural landscape, improve scenic views, and expand public access for park visitors. A yellow construction vehicle and two construction workers demolish an old building Studying the Past and Predicting the Future Using Rat Nests In the western United States, packrat middens are one of the best tools for reconstructing recent environments and climates. These accumulations of plant fragments, small vertebrate remains, rodent droppings, and other fossils can be preserved for more than 50,000 years. Packrat middens have been found in at least 41 National Park Service units. Photo of a wood rat. Series: Park Paleontology News - Vol. 14, No. 2, Fall 2022 All across the park system, scientists, rangers, and interpreters are engaged in the important work of studying, protecting, and sharing our rich fossil heritage. <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/newsletters.htm">Park Paleontology news</a> provides a close up look at the important work of caring for these irreplaceable resources. <ul><li>Contribute to Park Paleontology News by contacting the <a href="https://www.nps.gov/common/utilities/sendmail/sendemail.cfm?o=5D8CD5B898DDBB8387BA1DBBFD02A8AE4FBD489F4FF88B9049&r=/subjects/geoscientistsinparks/photo-galleries.htm">newsletter editor</a></li><li>Learn more about <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/">Fossils & Paleontology</a> </li><li>Celebrate <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossilday/">National Fossil Day</a> with events across the nation</li></ul> Photo of a person sitting while using a laboratory microscope. Series: Geologic Time—Major Divisions and NPS Fossils The National Park System contains a magnificent record of geologic time because rocks from each period of the geologic time scale are preserved in park landscapes. The geologic time scale is divided into four large periods of time—the Cenozoic Era, Mesozoic Era, Paleozoic Era, and The Precambrian. photo of desert landscape with a petrified wood log on the surface Series: Women's History in the Pacific West - Lower Colorado Basin Collection Biographies of women in parks from southern California, southern Nevada, and northwest Arizona Map of southern California, southern Nevada and northwest Arizona 50 Nifty Finds #6: Something Fishy How do fish get up the mountain? By horse, of course! When is a plant not a plant? When you plant a fish! What? No, those aren’t nonsensical kids’ jokes. Photographs from the NPS Historic Photograph Collection will help explain. A string of mules being led along a trail carrying milk cans A Changing Bimodal Climate Zone Means Changing Vegetation in Western National Parks When the climate changes enough, the vegetation communities growing in any given place will also change. Under an expanded bimodal climate zone, some plant communities in western national parks are more likely to change than others. National Park Service ecologists and partners investigated the future conditions that may force some of this change. Having this information can help park managers decide whether to resist, direct, or accept the change. Dark storm clouds and rainbow over mountains and saguaros. 2022 George and Helen Hartzog Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Service The National Park Service is pleased to congratulate the recipients of the 2022 George and Helen Hartzog Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Service. A montage of photos of volunteers working in a national park. When Communities Lead the Way Community (led) science takes scientific research outside park boundaries and into people’s lives. The effects can be transformational. Three women, one wearing a NPS uniform, stand smiling in front of a projector screen. Bats Are in Danger. Here’s How and Why We’re Helping Them. Bats are amazing animals and a formidable force against insect pests, but a nasty fungal disease is killing them. A coordinated national response brings hope. GIF of a bat with big ears in a gloved hand, rotating its head and opening and closing its mouth. Lesser Long-nosed Bat Research at Organ Pipe Cactus Lesser long-nosed bats have been in scientific focus since the late 1900's. These unique animals face different obstacles in their changing environment, but researchers are at work in Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, learning more about these bats. Through research here and throughout Central America, scientists are understanding better how to protect these animals and their environment. A small black lesser long-nosed bat with a black face hovers above a waxy white saguaro flower. Toad Research in Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument Research at Organ Pipe Cactus has seen large monsoons, drought, and the Sonoran Desert’s impact on different species of toad. The aim of this research is to understand which species are present, as well as the geographical reach of the chytrid fungus. A large dark green-gray Sonoran Desert toad sits in a pool of water. The Oasis Newsletter: Fall 2023 This biannual newsletter of the Mojave Desert Network Inventory and Monitoring Program features: an intern's summary of her experience working with our vegetation crew; two recent web publications on a nation-wide effort to conserve bats and monitoring vital signs in times of rapid change; outreach to MOJN park web managers to assist in increasing science and research content on their sites; and a variety of staffing updates. Woman with brimmed hat bends down to place a 3-foot tall blue flag along a transect in sagebrush. The Oasis Newsletter: Spring 2021 The Spring 2021 issue of the Mojave Desert Network newsletter bids farewell to our Ecologist and welcomes an Interim Ecologist and three field scientists hired this winter to support our monitoring projects. The newsletter also highlights recent outreach activities and collaborations with park staff, as well as a new project brief and a web article. We feature an article about the Dome Fire that killed an estimated 1.3 million Joshua trees in Mojave National Preserve. National Park Service scientist kneels on soil and filters a water sample from a desert spring. The Oasis Newsletter: Fall 2021 The Fall 2021 issue of the Mojave Desert Network newsletter highlights the recent "inconclusive" detection of a fungus causing bat disease; provides monitoring project updates and schedules; highlights recent project briefs and a data release report; features the network's first virtual science symposium; and summarizes staffing changes. Hiker walks on trail through golden aspen trees. The Oasis Newsletter: Fall 2022 This biannual newsletter of the Mojave Desert Network Inventory and Monitoring Program features: an update column from Allen Calvert, Network Program Manager; highlights from our first in-person science symposium in three years; a new project brief on selected large springs monitoring; outreach efforts in parks; and a variety of staffing updates. Four field staff smile in a selfie after finishing their last monitoring plot. Monitoring Vital Signs in Times of Rapid Change Environmental changes are occurring at increasing rates over the last century in the Mojave Desert. Examples include rising temperature, decreasing precipitation, and more frequent extreme events like wildfire and flooding. Learn more about what we are monitoring in the Mojave Desert Network parks, some early changes we are seeing, and how what we are learning can be used to help managers plan for the future. Two scientists stand over a small spring amidst desert shrubs in Death Valley National Park. The Oasis Newsletter: Spring 2022 In this newsletter, you will find our recent project summary on Desert Springs monitoring, staffing updates, highiights and links for an Inventory and Monitoring Division Scientists' training, a feature on fossil monitoring in Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument, and our spring and summer field schedule. Two scientists use a leveling rod and a digital level to read water channel elevation. The Oasis Newsletter: Spring 2023 This biannual newsletter of the Mojave Desert Network Inventory and Monitoring Program features: updates from regional Inventory & Monitoring Program Managers' meeting, satellite vegetation analysis and bird diversity in Joshua Tree National Park, staffing changes, our spring monitoring schedule, and a few images highlighting recent fieldwork. Woman stands in desert springs vegetation, stretching a meter tape out to monitor it.
National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Park Newspaper Lake Mead National Recreation Area www.nps.gov/lake Lake Mead National Recreation Area Spring 2017 Welcome to America's Most Diverse National Recreation Area Historic Railroad Trail National Recreation Trails Improved Lake Mead National Recreation Area’s two National Recreation Trails, the Historic Railroad Trail and River Mountains Loop Trail, received $380,000 in surface and drainage improvements in 2016 to ensure that the trails are in good condition for years to come. In this desert environment, trails especially highuse trails like these are subject to a lot of use and abuse from the daunting desert environment. The improvements will extend the overall life of the trails, preserving them for future generations. The Historic Railroad Trail was graded and received a new layer of decomposed granite and upgraded drainage that will improve the visitor experience. Accessibility of the trail was also improved by adding compact surface and extending the surface material to cover the rest areas. “The Historic Railroad Trail was designated as a National Recreation Trail a few years ago, and it needed to be made more accessible,” said Carl Bush, park civil engineer and project manager. “The existing trail surface was loose, and there was old railroad ballasts debris from when the tracks were removed. We realized that strollers and wheelchairs struggled with the surface.” Ed Price from the Accessible Trails Foundation was impressed with the improvements. “I did the 2.1 miles from the trailhead to the Bureau of Reclamation boundary and back in my wheelchair. This trail was previously off limits to me. I liked the firmness and its natural, esthetically pleasing appearance. It is beautiful,” he said. “I was especially pleased with the consistent evenness through the tunnels which gave me confidence while safely rolling through the nearly dark places,” he added. “In the spirit of universal design, the trail will be more comfortable for hikers and families because there are no protruding rock tripping hazards or loose coarse gravel.” The River Mountains Loop Trail is a paved trail that connects Lake Mead National Recreation Area, the City of Henderson and Boulder City with 34 miles of trail that surrounds the River Mountains, 17 miles of which are in Lake Mead National Recreation Area. Ten of the 17 miles of trail were repaired, resurfaced or replaced. Over 4,000 square feet of asphalt was poured and 10,000 feet of cracks were sealed according to Bush. The entire 17 miles within the park also received a slurry seal coat to help protect the surface from the damage of harsh summer temperatures that can crack the asphalt. “The River Mountains Loop Trail is a shining example of what can be accomplished when great agency partners like the National Park Service and the community comes together,” said Ron Floth co-chairman, River Mountains Loop Trail Partnership. “The River Mountains Loop Trail provides people from all walks of life an opportunity to experience the vast beauty of the Lake Mead National Recreation Area, River Mountains and the Las Vegas Valley. We are constantly receiving compliments on the trail and how lucky we are to have such a great resource right in our own backyards.” While we’re known for our hiking, biking, boating and more, in this issue, we’d like to share some of our park’s lesser-known stories, providing you a more complete picture of the experience you can have in the park. This park was established after the construction of the Hoover Dam. It became the first national recreation area within the National Park Service. In addition to protecting the natural resources across the park’s 1.5 million acres, we have the responsibility to preserve its recreational opportunities. We go to great lengths to help you have a quality, enjoyable experience during your visit to Lake Mead and Lake Mohave. Turn to page 5, to learn how you can visit a town that became covered by water after the construction of the Hoover Dam. On page 6, we share the lesser-known contributions and achievements African Americans made to the construction of the Hoover Dam. For even more history and to view artifacts from our cultural collection, visit www.nps.gov/features/lake/museum to tour our virtual museum. Thank you. Have a safe, enjoyable visit. Lizette Richardson - Superintendent National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Lake Mead National Recreation Area America’s Most Diverse National Recreation Area Lake Mead National Recreation Area provides diverse public recreation, benefit and use on lakes Mead and Mohave and surrounding lands in a manner that preserves the ecological, geological, cultural, historical, scenic, scientific and wilderness resources of the park. Vision To inspire and challenge everyone to find their connection to Lake Mead National Recreation Area and enjoy the adventure. Superintendent Lizette Richardson Park Info

also available

National Parks
USFS NW
Alaska
Arizona
California
Colorado
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Minnesota
Montana
Nevada
New Mexico
North Carolina
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Texas
Utah
Virginia
Washington
Wyoming
Lake Tahoe - COMING SOON! 🎈
Yellowstone
Yosemite