Katahdin Woods and Waters

National Monument - Maine

Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument spans 87,563 acres (35,435 ha) of mountains and forestland in northern Penobscot County, Maine, including a section of the East Branch Penobscot River. The monument is located on the eastern border of Maine's Baxter State Park.

location

maps

Tail Map of Appalachian National Scenic Trail (NST) in Connecticut, Georgia, Massachusetts, Maryland, Maine, North Carolina, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, Vermont, West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Appalachian - Trail Map

Tail Map of Appalachian National Scenic Trail (NST) in Connecticut, Georgia, Massachusetts, Maryland, Maine, North Carolina, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, Vermont, West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official Visitor Map of Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument (NM) in Maine. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Katahdin Woods and Waters - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument (NM) in Maine. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official Visitor Map of the northern part of Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument (NM) in Maine. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Katahdin Woods and Waters - Visitor Map - North

Official Visitor Map of the northern part of Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument (NM) in Maine. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official Visitor Map of the southern part of Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument (NM) in Maine. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Katahdin Woods and Waters - Visitor Map - South

Official Visitor Map of the southern part of Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument (NM) in Maine. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with DOI's Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with DOI's Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/kaww/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Katahdin_Woods_and_Waters_National_Monument Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument spans 87,563 acres (35,435 ha) of mountains and forestland in northern Penobscot County, Maine, including a section of the East Branch Penobscot River. The monument is located on the eastern border of Maine's Baxter State Park. Spread across a wild landscape offering spectacular views of Katahdin, Katahdin Woods and Waters invites discovery of its rivers, streams, woods, flora, fauna, geology, and the night skies that have attracted humans for millennia. Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument is located in north central Maine. Drive approximately 1.5 hours north of Bangor, Maine to reach Route 11 (Katahdin Woods and Waters Scenic Byway). Route 11 is the main route to the entrances to the park. Take Route 11 to Route 159 and Grand Lake Road to access the North Entrance. Follow Route 11 to Swift Brook Road to enter the South Entrance. Take Route 11 to Route 159 and American Thread Road to access the Seboeis Parcel. Lumbermen's Museum From late May to mid-October, National Park Service staff provide information and trip-planning assistance from a desk located inside the Patten Lumbermen's Museum. Maps and brochures are available, as well as the NPS passport stamp. The Patten Lumbermen’s Museum is located just northwest of Patten, ME, on ME-159 at 61 Shin Pond Road, Patten, ME 04765. The museum is located on the Katahdin Scenic Byway on the way to the northern entrances to Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument and Baxter State Park. Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument is located in north central Maine. Big Seboeis Campsite A backcountry campsite along the scenic East Branch of the Penobscot River. Campers can access this site by boating in or by hiking. There is a pit toilet (outhouse) available for use adjacent to the campsite. Walk-in, tent-only site 0.00 Walk-in, tent-only, first-come-first-serve. Big Seboeis Campsite A picnic table in a small clearing surrounded by trees by a river Big Seboeis campsites is one of several river-accessible sites along the East Branch Big Seboeis A clearing in the woods along the river with two picnic tables Big Seboeis has plenty of space for campers after a long day of paddling Boats on the Big Seboeis Three large canoes pulled up on shore near a sign for Big Seboeis Campsite Big Seboeis is a perfec spot to camp and rest after a long day of paddling Big Seboeis Campsite A group of campers with their canoes along the shore of a river. A shaded forest is behind them. Paddle or hike to this campsite for a spectacular view of the East Branch of the Penobscot River. Toilet A wooden outhouse is tucked in the woods off a main dirt trail. An outhouse is available for use by following a trail up and away from the campsite. Big Spring Brook Campsite Primitive backcountry campsite along the East Branch of the Penobscot River that is only accessible by boat. Boat-in, tent-only site 0.00 Primitive tent site with picnic table and fire ring. Big Spring Brook Campsite A forested rustic campsite to the right with a wild river flowing by on the left. The adventurous who float down the East Branch of the Penobscot River may stop here and find solitude along this wild river. Big Spring Brook Hut A beautiful log cabin tucked away in the heart of the forest of Katahdin Woods and Waters NM. Reservations are required through Recreation.gov. Plan for primitive camping experience by packing in your own essentials, such as a sleeping surface, sleeping bag, and a camp stove! This hut is only opened for camping during the winter. Park at the North Gate and cross-country ski or snowshoe 9.15 miles to Big Spring Brook Hut. It is a great place to keep warm, find solitude, and enjoy this winter wonderland! Walk-in, hut 0.00 Huts are free. However, to cover the cost of reservations made online or by phone through Recreation.gov, you will incur a non-refundable fee. You will pay $8 if your reservation is made through Recreation.gov online or $9 if made through Recreation.gov's call center, (877) 444-6777 (toll free) or (606) 515-6777 (international) 10 a.m. – 12 a.m. (Eastern Time Zone). Big Spring Brook Side view of a log cabin in the woods with snow on the ground. Big Spring Brook Hut in the winter. Kitchen at Big Spring Brook Hut Kitchen area with a counter, cabinets, and sink. A door and windows bring light into the hut. Big Spring Brook Hut kitchen area. Big Spring Brook Hut stove A black wood stove and dried kindling and logs ready for visitors inside the hut. Use the wood stove in the hut to stay warm during the cold winter. Big Spring Brook Hut Living Space Wooden dining table with card games and green bunk beds behind. Kitchen is in the background Enjoy a meal and play some games next to the wood stove during the cold winter. Games are provided in the huts for visitor use. Kitchen Use Procedures Close up of kitchen use procedures posted inside the hut with a plastic wash bin for visitor use. Please follow the principles of Leave No Trace and keep all liquids out of the sink. Big Spring Brook Hut cookware for public use Plastic tubs and a silver pot on a silver industrial kitchen table sit ready for visitors to use. The hut is supplied with cookware for public use. Please return items back in their original storage before leaving. Cookware A zoomed in image of metal pots and pans in a blue tote. Pots and pans are provided for use. They are located in the blue tote in the kitchen space. Please clean and dry everything before leaving the huts. Toilet facilities at Big Spring Brook Hut A wooden outhouse with a door in the woods Toilet facilities at Big Spring Brook Hut Big Spring Brook Hut Tree trunks and woods in the foreground with a log cabin in the background. Big Spring Brook Hut is tucked away deep in the forest next to a brook. Big Spring Brook Hut (summer) The front of a log cabin with a porch and steps in the woods. Big Spring Brook Hut is currently closed during the spring and summer. Sleeping Spaces A wooden dining table is in the foreground with two wooden bucks against the wall in the background. Remember to pack in your preferred sleeping surface for the bunks. Living Room A green wooden bunk bed next to wooden ladder and door. The ladder has a keep off sign. Big Spring Brook Hut has multiple bunks for sleeping. Stay on the ground level during your visit. Big Spring Brook Snow and ice forming in a brook meandering in the woods. Ice and snow begin to cover over Big Spring Brook in the winter. woodshed A small wooden shed with a tick layer of snow on the angled roof. Thick snow is on the ground. A woodshed (foreground) and pit toilet (background) can be found outside of the hut. Entry to hut A cropped close up image of an opened door to a brown log cabin. Steps are layered with snow. Upon arrival, enter with the side door located on the left side of the building. Big Spring Brook Hut A small wooden cabin with steps and windows is surrounded with thick snow in the woods. Deep snow is typically found outside! Use caution when outside of the hut. Esker Campsite Hike or bike approximately 2.2 miles from the Wassataquoik Gate to the Esker Campsite, located on the bank of Wassataquoik Stream. Walk-in, tent-only site 0.00 No fee required Esker Campsite A picnic table, fire ring, and clearing for a tent on the bank of Wassataquoik Stream. Esker Campsite is located on the west bank of Wassataquoik Stream. Esker Campsite sign A sign points the way to Esker Campsite Follow the signs from Wassataquoik Gate to reach Esker Campsite Wassataquoik Stream A clear stream with large boulders is surrounded by tall pines Esker Campsite boasts unparalleled views of the Wassataquoik Stream Grand Pitch Lean-to A backcountry lean-to along the International Appalachian Trail and Grand Pitch Portage. Walk-in, lean-to 0.00 Backcountry lean-to, picnic table, and fire pit. Grand Pitch Lean-to A three-sided and roofed wooden structure in the woods Grand Pitch Lean-to provides shelter for campers Robert Neuman Grand Pitch Lean-to Fire pit and picnic table with lean-to in background. All surrounded by forest and vegetation. Whether you're tired from traveling through multiple portages along the East Branch of the Penobscot River or from hiking multiple miles along the International Appalachian Trail, the Robert Neuman Grand Pitch Lean-to is the place to spend the night. Grand Pitch Lean-to A camper sits in the middle of a three-sided, roofed camping structure, behind a fire pit Camping at the Grand Pitch Lean-to Sign at Grand Pitch A sign reading "IAT Grand Pitch Campsite - Portage" A sign directing IAT hikers and paddlers for portage Haskell Campsite Backcountry campsite along the banks of Haskell Deadwater and the Haskell Rock Pitch Portage. walk-in, tent-only site 0.00 First-come-first-serve backcountry campsite Haskell Campsite Campsite in a forest clearing witha storage shed behind. Whether hiking or paddling, Haskell Campsite is a beautiful spot for all to enjoy. Also a great place for enjoying the wonders of the night sky. Portage at Haskell Deadwater A grassy bank alongside a river surrounded by shrubbery. A sign indicates portage and campground. Haskell Deadwater Campsite provides a remote respite for paddlers or hikers in the vicinity Haskell Deadwater Portage Sign A sign reading "Haskell Deadwater Campsite Portage" A sign guides paddlers to the camping area Haskell Hut A small log cabin on a hill with a beautiful view of Haskell Deadwater. Here, you can enjoy the sounds and sights of the woods and the waters. Reservations are required through Recreation.gov and can be reserved by groups of up to 8 people. Camping in the hut is only available in the winter. The hut is reached by cross-country skiing or snowshoeing. This is a primitive camping experience. Remember to pack in essentials (sleeping surface, sleeping bag, cook stove) and follow Leave No Trace principles. Walk-in, hut 0.00 Huts are free. However, to cover the cost of reservations made online or by phone through Recreation.gov, you will incur a non-refundable fee. You will pay $8 if your reservation is made through Recreation.gov online or $9 if made through Recreation.gov's call center, (877) 444-6777 (toll free) or (606) 515-6777 (international) 10 a.m. – 12 a.m. (Eastern Time Zone). Haskell Hut A log cabin on a snowy hill. Evergreen trees frame the back for the cabin. Welcome to Haskell Hut in the winter! Reserve to stay at this scenic site. Haskell Hut Pit Toilet A snowy trail leads to a wooden pit toilet tucked in the woods. There is a pit toilet available for use outside, detached from the cabin. Wooden Bed A close up of a square raised wooden platform intended for sleeping. Board games stored next to it. Stay warm inside the hut during wintertime and enjoy provided board games! Cookware A close up photo of metal pots and pans for use. Stored inside a blue plastic tub. Pots and pans are stored inside a blue plastic tub for visitor use. Haskell Hut Kitchen Space Kitchen countertop and sink with a scenic winter view outside the window. Enjoy the views of Haskell Deadwater as you prepare your meal. Please keep all liquids out of the sink. Haskell Hut Wooden Bunks 2 wooden square raised sleeping surfaces inside a log cabin Sleep on raised wooden sleeping surfaces in the hut. Bring your own bedding! Haskell Hut Stove Woodstove in the middle of a log cabin. Wood stacked for use against the wall and wood bunks behind. The wood stove is a great source of heat for the hut during frigid winter nights. Haskell Hut Entry Entry to the wooden hut. A open doorway divides up sleeping space and dining space. A large map and dining table greet you at the entrance of the hut. Haskell Table A wooden dining table with 4 chair around it inside a wood cabin. 4 slim windows let light inside. Enjoy a warm meal or play games while you stay at Haskell Hut. Haskell Hut and Woodshed A dark brown log cabin next to a woodshed in the woods Haskell Hut in the summer. Camping is only open in the winter. Winter Haskell Deadwater View The foreground is a frozen and snowy pond. Background is a short mountain and clear blue skies. The view from Haskell Hut. Katahdin Brook Lean-to The closest backcountry site at 0.4 miles from the Barnard Mountain Trailhead / Southern Terminus of the International Appalachian Trail and the Loop Road. This is a Lean-to site only. Walk-in 0.00 Backcountry Lean-to. Katahdin Brook Lean-to A rustic stone firepit in front of a picnic table and Lean-to. Surrounded by trees and shrubs. Many International Appalachian Trail thru-hikers will stay at the Katahdin Brook Lean-to to begin their journey north. Other visitors stay to enjoy the rustic backcountry for a night or two. Katahdin Brook Lean to A roofed, three-sided wooden structure in the woods with a picnic table in the foreground Katahdin Brook lean-to is close to Barnard Mountain Interior view of Katahdin Brook Lean-to A three-quarters angle of a roofed, wooden, lean-to structure in shadow A closer look at the Katahdin Brook lean-to Lunksoos Campsites The Lunksoos campground area has a total of 7 campsites near the East Branch of the Penobscot River. Campsite 1 is an ADA site, and sites 6 and 7 are group sites. Campers will park their vehicles in the parking lot and walk their equipment to their site. A vault toilet is located at the parking lot. Walk-in, tent-only 0.00 No fees are charged. Lunksoos Campsite 1 A campsite with metal fire ring, picnic table, and bear box within a forest. Lunksoos Campsite 1 Lunksoos Campsite 2 A campsite with metal fire ring, picnic table, and bear box within a forest. Lunksoos Campsite 2 Lunksoos Campsite 3 A campsite with metal fire ring, picnic table, and bear box within a forest. Lunksoos Campsite 3 Lunksoos Campsite 4 A campsite with metal fire ring, picnic table, and bear box within a forest. Lunksoos Campsite 4 Lunksoos Campsite 5 A campsite with metal fire ring, picnic table, and bear box within a forest. Lunksoos Campsite 5 Lunksoos Campsite 6 (Group Site) A group campsite with 3 platforms, metal fire ring, picnic table, and bear box within a forest. Lunksoos Campsite 6 (Group Campsite) Lunksoos Campsite 7 (Group Site) A group campsite with 3 platforms, metal fire ring, picnic table, and bear box within a forest. Lunksoos Campsite 7 (Group Site) Lunksoos Campsite Sign and Vault Toilet A vault toilet facility with a campsite sign reading "Lunksoos Campsite" and poster board Lunksoos Campsites Sign and Vault Toilet Accessible Parking Spot at Lunksoos Campsite A flat gravel parking area with a handicap sign, to the right a path leads into the woods Lunksoos Campsite provides an accessible camping site and parking area Seboeis Road & Vault Toilet A gravel road travels through a forest with colorful leaves on an overcast day. A vault toilet is located before you arrive at the group sites and at the front of the parking lot. Wood Tent Platform A raised square wooden platform above a ground covered with fallen leave. It is a fall day. An example of a raised wooden tent platform at the group campsites. Lunksoos Mountain Lean-To A rugged lean-to site within the heart of the backcountry of Katahdin Woods & Waters National Monument. Walk-in lean-to 0.00 Lean-to, picnic table, firepit Lunksoos Lean-to and Picnic Table A three-sided and roofed log structure The Lunksoos Lean-to Lunksoos Lean-to Camping Area A three-sided log lean-to with picnic table and fire pit in a field surrounded by trees Lean-to with picnic table and fire pit Lunksoos Mountain Lean-to Water Source Sign A wooden sign that reads, "water", along the trail. A sign pointing campers to a mountain stream to filter water. Lunksoos Mountain Lean-to Outhouse Wooden outhouse within a forest. The rustic outhouse of the lean-to. Lunksoos Mountain Lean-to A wooden rustic lean-to with forest in the background Lunksoos Mountian Lean-to is a great place to stay to enjoy the sights and sounds of the wild while achieving solitude. Lunksoos Mountain Lean-to Picnic Table and Firepit Wooden picnic table on left with firepit to the right. Shrubs and grasses growing along edge. Great spot to socialize or enjoy solitude by a fire and enjoy the dark night skies. Lunksoos Lean-to at Night A cabin in the trees with a starry night sky The dark skies of Katahdin as viewed from the Lunksoos Lean-to area Pond Pitch Campsite A rustic backcountry campsite overlooking the majestic Pond Pitch and wild East Branch of the Penobscot River. Walk-in, tent-site only 0.00 Rustic campsite with fire pit, picnic table, and place for a tent. Pond Pitch Campsite Picnic table and firepit surrounded by forest with river and waterfall in background. If falling asleep to the sound of a waterfall appeals to your senses, then Pond Pitch Campsite might be what you're after. Pond Pitch Campsite A picnic table and fire pit in a forested campsite by a river Pond Pitch campsite sits right by the East Branch Penobscot River Pond Pitch Camping Area A picnic table in a forest clearing with a fire pit in the background Pond Pitch Campsite is equipped as an area for campers and paddlers Pond Pitch Sign A sign for Pond Pitch West points the way to the portage trail and the campsite. Pond Pitch portage has a carry trail and a campsite Sandbank Stream Campground Located approximately 10 miles from the intersection of Route 11 and Swift Brook Rd. Contains 3 sites. Campsite fee 0.00 No fees are charged. Sandbank Stream All Sites Two tents and a van set up in a flat sandy area surrounded by trees Sandbank Stream Campground offers three drive-in sites. Sandbank Stream Pit Toilet Pit toilet on concrete pad. Pit toilet at Sandbank Stream Campground. Sandbank Stream Tent Pad Gravel tent pad framed by logs and small rocks. Each site at Sandbank Stream has a gravel surface. Sandbank Stream Camping Area Picnic table, fire ring and bear box on sandy gravel surface with forest in the background. Sandbank Stream Campsites are equipped with a picnic table, fire ring and bear box. Stair Falls Campsite A primitive campsite located near the portage trail for Stair Falls. The campsite can be reached by a 2-mile hike from Haskell Gate or by paddling down the East Branch Penobscot River. Walk-in or boat-in, tent-only 0.00 No fee required. Stair Falls Campsite Sign reading "Stair Falls West Campsite Portage" next to a river, with a picnic table. The Stair Falls West Campsite is located on the bank of the East Branch Penobscot River. Stair Falls Campsite A cleared camping area with a picnic table and fire pit Make sure to acquire a fire permit if you plan to light a fire at Stair Falls Campsite! Stair Falls Campsite A tent pitched by a tree at night. The stars are bright in the sky. A campfire burns brightly. Campers enjoying the dark skies at Stair Falls campsite Upper East Branch Campsite Walk-in campsite along the East Branch of the Penobscot River. Walk-in, tent-only 0.00 First-come, first-serve Upper East Branch Campsite Two tents pitched on a flat grassy surface in the woods, a river runs in the background. Two tents set up at the Upper East Branch Campsite Upper East Branch Campground Wooden sign at the entrance of Upper East Branch Campground A short walk leads to a large campsite with views of the river Upper East Branch Campsite Sign A sign reading "Upper East Branch Campsite" with a tarp pitched in the background A sign on the side of the river to announce your arrival at Upper East Branch Campsite Wassataquoik Campsite A beautiful primitive backcountry campsite next to Katahdin Brook along the International Appalachian Trail. The campsite is near the Wassataquoik Lean-to and is 0.9 miles from the trailhead at Wassataquoik Gate or 1.4 miles from the Barnard Mountain Trailhead. Walk-in 0.00 Walk-in primitive tent site. Wassataquoik Campsite A mulchy clearing in the woods with a picnic table, firepit and log bench Many enjoy setting up camp at Wassataquoik Campsite for it's strategic location near many of the national monument's points of interest. Wassataquoik Campsite A campsite in a clearing with a log bench, fire pit and picnic table The campsite provides a natural bench, picnic table, and fire pit. Wassataquoik Campsite A campsite in a clearing with a log bench, fire pit and picnic table The campsite provides a natural bench, picnic table, and fire pit. A tent pitched at Wassataquoik campsite A bright yellow tent pitched between a tree and a picnic table in a clearing in the woods Wassataquik Campsite is nearby a stream and along the trail to Orin Falls Wassataquoik Lean-to A rustic backcountry Lean-to along the International Appalachian Trail near the Wassataquoik Stream. The site is 0.9 miles from the Wassataquoik Gate or 1.4 miles from the Barnard Mountain Trailhead. Walk-in 0.00 Walk-in primitive backcountry lean-to. Wassataquoik Lean-to A three-sided wooden lean to with a fire pit and picnic table in a clearing in the woods Many visitors take advantage of both Wassataquoik Lean-to's close proximity to many of the national monument's highlights and the solitude.. Wassataquoik Lean-to A three-sided shaded structure made of logs, a broom hangs inside the lean-to Wassataquoik lean-to provides shelter from the elements Wassataquoik Lean-t0 A three-sided shaded structure made of logs, a broom hangs inside the lean-to The sturdy lean-to at Wassataquoik is a good option for hikers looking to stay near Orin Falls and the IAT Toilet facilities at Lean-to A small outhouse off a path in the woods Wassataquoik lean-to has a vault toilet nearby East Branch of the Penobscot River Mirror reflection of Lunksoos Mountain and trees within the water of the river. The East Branch of the Penobscot River is filled with wildness and beautiful scenery for the adventurous few who travel down it. Autumn Foliage Autumn foliage along a dirt logging road. Katahdin Woods & Waters National Monument has arguably the best autumn foliage out of any national park unit. Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Ordovician Period—485.4 to 443.8 MYA Shenandoah and Great Smoky Mountains national parks, along with the Blue Ridge Parkway that connects them, pass through rocks from the core of the Appalachian Mountains. The mountains began forming during the Ordovician and eventually attained elevations similar to those of the Himalayas. rock with fossil brachiopod shells Silurian Period—443.8 to 419.2 MYA Excellent exposures and well-preserved fossils in Silurian rocks of Glacier Bay National Park & Preserve provide clues to the timing of the assembly of Alaska’s assembly from a variety of continental fragments. fossil corals in a rock matrix Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Changing Patterns of Water Availability May Change Vegetation Composition in US National Parks Across the US, changes in water availability are altering which plants grow where. These changes are evident at a broad scale. But not all areas experience the same climate in the same way, even within the boundaries of a single national park. A new dataset gives park managers a valuable tool for understanding why vegetation has changed and how it might change in the future under different climate-change scenarios. Green, orange, and dead grey junipers in red soil, mountains in background Helping a New National Monument: Katahdin Woods and Waters On the eve of the National Park Service’s centennial in 2016, President Barack Obama designated 87,500 acres as the Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument – the first national monument to preserve the landscape and honor the history and culture of Maine’s North Woods in Penobscot County. The superintendent of the new national monument asked NPS-RTCA to assist with engaging local communities and leading various planning projects. A wooden interpretive sign reading “Welcome to Katahdin Woods & Waters National Monument” Paleontology of Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument preserves rocks and fossils from much of the first half of the Paleozoic Era, approximately 540 to 400 million years ago, when what is now the east coast of North America was growing with additions of small continental fragments. Fossils have been occasionally reported from the monument by scientists in the past, but this is the first time that a thorough inventory has been made of the monument’s fossils. Photo of a rock outcrop in a stream with forested banks. Series: Park Paleontology News - Vol. 14, No. 2, Fall 2022 All across the park system, scientists, rangers, and interpreters are engaged in the important work of studying, protecting, and sharing our rich fossil heritage. <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/newsletters.htm">Park Paleontology news</a> provides a close up look at the important work of caring for these irreplaceable resources. <ul><li>Contribute to Park Paleontology News by contacting the <a href="https://www.nps.gov/common/utilities/sendmail/sendemail.cfm?o=5D8CD5B898DDBB8387BA1DBBFD02A8AE4FBD489F4FF88B9049&r=/subjects/geoscientistsinparks/photo-galleries.htm">newsletter editor</a></li><li>Learn more about <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/">Fossils & Paleontology</a> </li><li>Celebrate <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossilday/">National Fossil Day</a> with events across the nation</li></ul> Photo of a person sitting while using a laboratory microscope. Series: Geologic Time—Major Divisions and NPS Fossils The National Park System contains a magnificent record of geologic time because rocks from each period of the geologic time scale are preserved in park landscapes. The geologic time scale is divided into four large periods of time—the Cenozoic Era, Mesozoic Era, Paleozoic Era, and The Precambrian. photo of desert landscape with a petrified wood log on the surface

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