by Alex Gugel , all rights reserved

Joshua Tree

National Park - California

Joshua Tree National Park is a vast protected area in southern California. It's characterized by rugged rock formations and stark desert landscapes. Named for the region’s twisted, bristled Joshua trees, the park straddles the cactus-dotted Colorado Desert and the Mojave Desert, which is higher and cooler. Keys View looks out over the Coachella Valley. Hiking trails weave through the boulders of Hidden Valley.

location

maps

Official Visitor Map of Joshua Tree National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Joshua Tree - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Joshua Tree National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Travel Map of Wonder Valley in the BLM Barstow Field Office area in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Wonder Valley - Travel Map

Travel Map of Wonder Valley in the BLM Barstow Field Office area in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Travel Map of West Joshua Tree in the BLM Barstow Field Office area in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).West Joshua Tree - Travel Map

Travel Map of West Joshua Tree in the BLM Barstow Field Office area in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Travel Map of East Joshua Tree in the BLM Barstow Field Office area in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).East Joshua Tree - Travel Map

Travel Map of East Joshua Tree in the BLM Barstow Field Office area in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Detail map of Black Rock Canyon in Joshua Tree National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Joshua Tree - Black Rock Canyon

Detail map of Black Rock Canyon in Joshua Tree National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Detail map of Cottonwood in Joshua Tree National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Joshua Tree - Cottonwood

Detail map of Cottonwood in Joshua Tree National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Detail map of Covington Flats in Joshua Tree National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Joshua Tree - Covington Flats

Detail map of Covington Flats in Joshua Tree National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Detail map of the Geology Tour in Joshua Tree National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Joshua Tree - Geology Tour

Detail map of the Geology Tour in Joshua Tree National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Detail map of Keys West in Joshua Tree National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Joshua Tree - Keys West

Detail map of Keys West in Joshua Tree National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Detail map of the North Entrance area in Joshua Tree National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Joshua Tree - North Entrance

Detail map of the North Entrance area in Joshua Tree National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Detail map of Pine City in Joshua Tree National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Joshua Tree - Pine City

Detail map of Pine City in Joshua Tree National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Detail map of Pleasant Valley in Joshua Tree National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Joshua Tree - Pleasant Valley

Detail map of Pleasant Valley in Joshua Tree National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Detail map of Turkey Flats in Joshua Tree National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Joshua Tree - Turkey Flats

Detail map of Turkey Flats in Joshua Tree National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of Northern Santa Rosa Region of the Santa Rosa and San Jacinto Mountains National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Santa Rosa and San Jacinto Mountains - Northern Santa Rosa Region

Map of Northern Santa Rosa Region of the Santa Rosa and San Jacinto Mountains National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Travel Map of Rattlesnake Canyon in the BLM Barstow Field Office area in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Rattlesnake Canyon - Travel Map

Travel Map of Rattlesnake Canyon in the BLM Barstow Field Office area in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Visitor Map of Sand to Snow National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Sand to Snow - Visitor Map

Visitor Map of Sand to Snow National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Vintage 1954 USGS 1:250000 Map of Salton Sea in California and Arizona. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).Vintage USGS - Salton Sea - 1954

Vintage 1954 USGS 1:250000 Map of Salton Sea in California and Arizona. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

Vintage 1954 USGS 1:250000 Map of Needles in California and Arizona. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).Vintage USGS - Needles - 1954

Vintage 1954 USGS 1:250000 Map of Needles in California and Arizona. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

Vintage 1947 USGS 1:250000 Map of Santa Ana in California. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).Vintage USGS - Santa Ana - 1947

Vintage 1947 USGS 1:250000 Map of Santa Ana in California. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

Vintage 1953 USGS 1:250000 Map of San Bernardino in California. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).Vintage USGS - San Bernardino - 1953

Vintage 1953 USGS 1:250000 Map of San Bernardino in California. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

https://www.nps.gov/jotr https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joshua_Tree_National_Park Joshua Tree National Park is a vast protected area in southern California. It's characterized by rugged rock formations and stark desert landscapes. Named for the region’s twisted, bristled Joshua trees, the park straddles the cactus-dotted Colorado Desert and the Mojave Desert, which is higher and cooler. Keys View looks out over the Coachella Valley. Hiking trails weave through the boulders of Hidden Valley. Two distinct desert ecosystems, the Mojave and the Colorado, come together in Joshua Tree National Park. A fascinating variety of plants and animals make their homes in a land sculpted by strong winds and occasional torrents of rain. Dark night skies, a rich cultural history, and surreal geologic features add to the wonder of this vast wilderness in southern California. Come explore for yourself! From I-10, take exit 117 for CA Hwy 62 toward 29 Palms/Yucca Valley. This will allow you to access the West Entrance, the North Entrance, Black Rock, and Indian Cove. Take exit 168 off I-10 to come in at the park's South Entrance. Black Rock Nature Center Located in the heart of the beautiful Black Rock Campground, the Nature Center offers a bookstore, art gallery, visitor resources, and a picnic area. Visitors can chat with a park ranger, shop at the bookstore, and observe exhibits in the art gallery. There is also a water-bottle filling station and a restroom with flush toilets. The Nature Center is open daily from 8:00-11:00am 12:00-4:00pm. It is closed from 11:00am - 12:00pm. Hours may vary depending on staff availability, especially in the summer. From CA Hwy 62 (the Twentynine Palms Hwy), turn south onto Joshua Lane or Avalon Avenue. Continue for about 5 miles, following signs to Black Rock. Cottonwood Visitor Center Located on Pinto Basin Road, approximately 7 miles north of Interstate 10 (exit 168), the Cottonwood Visitor Center is a convenient stop for those entering and exiting the park from the south. It has educational exhibits, a bookstore, visitor resources, and restroom facilities. You can grab a park map, buy an entrance pass, fill up your water bottle, and chat with a park ranger to get all your questions answered. From I-10, take exit 168 for the Cottonwood Springs Rd. Enter Joshua Tree National Park at the South Entrance. Continue Cottonwood Springs Rd. for about 6 miles. Cottonwood Visitor Center will be on your right. Joshua Tree National Park Visitor Center The Joshua Tree National Park Visitor Center is located in downtown Twentynine Palms and features educational exhibits, a bookstore and giftshop, and visitor information. Heading east on Hwy 62 into the town of Twentynine Palms: Turn right onto Freedom Way, which may show up on your map as Yucca Ave. If you reach National Park Drive, you have gone too far. Heading west on Hwy 62 into the town of Twentynine Palms: Turn left onto Freedom Way (aka Yucca Ave). If you reach Tamarisk Ave you have gone too far. The Joshua Tree National Park Visitor Center is located next to Freedom Plaza, less than a block off of Hwy 62 Joshua Tree Visitor Center Located in downtown Joshua Tree just five miles from the West Entrance, the Joshua Tree Visitor Center offers educational exhibits, a bookstore, and visitor resources. Grab a park map, buy an entrance pass, and chat with a park ranger to get all your questions answered before heading into the park! From CA Hwy 62 (the Twentynine Palms Highway) in downtown Joshua Tree, turn south onto Park Blvd. The Joshua Tree Visitor Center will be on your right. Belle Campground This small campground has 18 sites. There are pit toilets, picnic tables, and fire pits. There is no water so bring plenty of your own. To secure a campsite, 1. Locate an empty campsite. 2. Occupy the site (set up a tent or leave personal items to show site occupancy). 3. Proceed immediately to an entrance station to complete registration and pay. You must pay for the site within one hour of set up. If arriving after entrance stations close, payment may be delayed until morning. Campsite Fee 15.00 Campsites must be paid for at an entrance station. A maximum of six people, three tents, and two cars may occupy an individual campsite, only if there is space available. Some sites only have enough parking for one vehicle. Senior/Access Pass Campsite Fee 7.50 Nightly camping fee for one site for a camper with a Senior or Access pass. Camping fees must be paid at an entrance station. A maximum of six people, three tents, and two cars may occupy an individual campsite, only if there is space available. Some sites only have enough parking for one vehicle. Belle Campground Information Board Belle Campground information board is shown in front of a trail and a Joshua tree. Located off Pinto Basin Road in the northern end of the park. Belle has 18 campsites. Belle Campsite A campground with a picnic table, a grill and a Joshua tree. Belle Campground offers great view to the west - making it a great place to watch the sunset. Belle Campground View Under a large rock in the distance you can see a pit toilet and road. Belle Campground offers great view to the west - making it a great place to watch the sunset. Facility at Belle Campground A paved path leads to a vault toilet. Belle has vault toilets and no running water. Campsite at Belle A post with the number "15". In the background, a picnic table and charcoal grill are in a campsite. There are 18 sites at Belle Campground. Campsites are surrounded by large boulders. Black Rock Campground This large (99 site) campground is located in the northwest corner of the park. Each campsite has a picnic table and fire ring with rest rooms and water nearby. Shopping facilities are only five miles away in the town of Yucca Valley. Campsites vary in size and can accommodate both tents and RVs. A day-use picnic area and a dump station are also available. For horse owners, a separate area is provided for camping or for staging a ride. Campsite 25.00 The cost is $25 for tents, RVs, and equestrian sites. A maximum of six people, three tents, and two cars may occupy an individual campsite, only if there is space available. Some sites only have enough parking for one vehicle. Black Rock Horse Site 20.00 Black Rock Horse Camp is open all year and has 20 sites. Reservations are required. For reservations, call 1-877-444-6777. Senior/Access Pass Campsite 12.50 Nightly camping fee for one site for a camper with a Senior or Access pass. A maximum of six people, three tents, and two cars may occupy an individual campsite, only if there is space available. Some sites only have enough parking for one vehicle. Senior/Access Pass Black Rock Horse Campsite 10.00 Nightly camping fee for one site for a camper with a Senior or Access pass. Black Rock Horse Camp is open all year and has 20 sites. Reservations are required. For reservations, call 1-877-444-6777. Black Rock Campground Entrance A road leads past a sign that says "Black Rock Canyon Campground" Black Rock is one of the largest campgrounds in the park and is surrounded by a large concentration of Joshua Trees. Black Rock Campground and Visitor Center Parking Lot A small parking lot with cars and a building. The campground has a small nature center open October through May. Campers register and pay camping fees at the nature center located in the middle of the campground. The staff at this small visitor center will help you plan a hike or other activity. Black Rock Campsite A tent is next to a Joshua Tree in a campsite. Currently 99 sites are available at Black Rock Campground. Black Rock Campground Bathrooms A building is surrounded by Joshua trees. The Black Rock Campgrounds is one of the few that has running water and flush toilets. Campsite on the east side of the Black Rock Campground. A Joshua Tree, tent and two chairs are around a fire pit. There are 99 campsites at Black Rock. Cottonwood Campground The Cottonwood Campground is reservation only and has 62 sites, potable water and flush toilets. The Campground is near the Cottonwood Visitor Center in the southeast part of the park. The closest metropolitan area is Indio about 30 miles away. Campsite Fee 25.00 Individual Campsite Fee. A maximum of six people, three tents, and two cars may occupy an individual campsite, only if there is space available. Some sites only have enough parking for one vehicle. Group Campsite Fee 40.00 There are three group campsites. Cost is $35-40 depending on site capacity. Tents only. RVs and habitable trailers prohibited. Senior/Access Pass Campsite Fee 12.50 Nightly camping fee for one site for a camper with a Senior or Access pass. A maximum of six people, three tents, and two cars may occupy an individual campsite, only if there is space available. Some sites only have enough parking for one vehicle. Senior/Access Pass Group Campsite Fee 20.00 Nightly camping fee for one site for a camper with a Senior or Access pass. There are three group campsites. Cost is $17.50-20 depending on site capacity. Tents only. RVs and habitable trailers prohibited. Cottonwood Campground A view looking down onto the Cottonwood Campground showing the bathrooms, tent sites and RV sites. Cottonwood campground has individual and groups sites, including an amphitheater for evening ranger programs. Campsite at Cottonwood Campground A picnic table in a campsite is next to a road. The landscape around Cottonwood is that of the Colorado Desert, which encompasses the southern edge of the park and a large portion of Southern California. Cottonwood Campground Amphitheater Rows of seats are in front of an outdoor stage. Cottonwood campground has individual and groups sites, including an amphitheater for evening ranger programs. Campsite at Cottonwood Campground A campsite with a picnic table and fire pit. Cottonwood Campground is one of the best places in Joshua Tree National Park for stargazing and wildflower viewing. Located in the southern park of the park at lower elevation, it has little shade from vegetation. Facilities at Cottonwood Campground A small building with two doors and a circular sign that says "women" The Cottonwood Campground has running water and flush toilets. Hidden Valley Campground The Hidden Valley Campground has 44 sites. There are pit toilets, picnic tables, and fire pits. There is no water so bring plenty of your own. To secure a campsite, 1. Locate an empty campsite. 2. Occupy the site (set up a tent or leave personal items to show site occupancy). 3. Proceed immediately to an entrance station to complete registration and pay. You must pay for the site within one hour of set up. If arriving after entrance stations close, payment may be delayed until the following morning. Hidden Valley Campsite 15.00 Camping fees must be paid within one hour of selecting a campsite. A maximum of six people, three tents, and two cars may occupy an individual campsite, only if there is space available. Some sites only have enough parking for one vehicle. Senior/Access Pass Hidden Valley Campsite 7.50 Nightly camping fee for one site for a camper with a Senior or Access pass. Camping fees must be paid at an entrance station. A maximum of six people, three tents, and two cars may occupy an individual campsite, only if there is space available. Some sites only have enough parking for one vehicle. Hidden Valley Campground A pit toilet, information board, emergency phone and a path. Hidden Valley has 44 Campsites and is a popular campground. Campsite at Hidden Valley A tent, fire pit, picnic table are in a campsite surrounded by boulders. Campsites at Hidden Valley are surrounded by large boulder outcrops. Hidden Valley Campground Board A Campground Board in the foreground with a parking lot in the background. Hidden Valley has a medium sized parking lot. The Hidden Valley Campground area is a popular spot, especially for climbers. Hidden Valley Campsite and Climbing Two climbers are climbing on rocks behind a tent set up in a Hidden Valley Campsite. The Hidden Valley Campground is located in a popular climbing area. There are many climbing and bouldering routes right next to campsites. Hidden Valley Campground An RV is parked at a campsite in Hidden Valley. Both RVs and tents are allowed in Hidden Valley. RVs and trailers may not exceed a combined maximum length of 25 ft at Hidden Valley Campground. Indian Cove Campground Indian Cove Campground is located off of Highway 62, thirteen miles east of Joshua Tree Village and ten miles west of Twentynine Palms. It has 101 campsites, including thirteen group campsites. Between Memorial Day and Labor Day, there are 39 reservable sites. There are vault toilets but no water at the campsites. There is a water bottle/jug filling station at the small ranger station roughly two miles north of the campground. For a RV-filling station, there is one at our headquarters in 29 Palms. Individual Campsite at Indian Cove 20.00 A maximum of six people, three tents, and two cars may occupy an individual campsite, only if there is space available. Some sites only have enough parking for one vehicle. Group Campsite at Indian Cove 50.00 There are 13 Group Campsites at Indian Cove Campground. The cost is $35-50 depending on the site capactiy. These group sites can accommodate RVs or trailers, but maximum combined length can be no more than 25 feet. Senior/Access Pass Individual Campsite at Indian Cove 10.00 Nightly camping fee for one site for a camper with a Senior or Access pass. A maximum of six people, three tents, and two cars may occupy an individual campsite, only if there is space available. Some sites only have enough parking for one vehicle. Senior/Access Group Campsite at Indian Cove 25.00 Nightly camping fee for one site for a camper with a Senior or Access pass. There are 13 Group Campsites at Indian Cove Campground. The cost is $17.50-25 depending on the site capacity. These group sites can accommodate RVs or trailers, but maximum combined length can be no more than 25 feet. Indian Cove Entrance Station A sign that reads 'Joshua Tree National Park... Indian Cove'. Behind it is a building. The entrance station at Indian Cove Campground. You can pay the camping fee and get water here. Restrooms at Indian Cove A paved path leading to a small vault toilet. Indian Cove Campground has no running water around the campsites but there are vault toilets available. Indian Cove Campground Looking down on Indian Cove Campground with the road, a vault toilet and campsites. Indian Cove Campground lies amid the huge, steep rock formations for which Joshua Tree National Park is known. Amphitheater at Indian Cove Rows of seats and a stage surrounded by a large rock formation. Indian Cove has an amphitheater for ranger programs and talks. Indian Cove Group Campsite Several tents and picnic tables lit up in the evening in front of large rock formations. One of Indian Cove Campground's group sites. Jumbo Rocks Campground There are 124 individual/family sites in Jumbo Rocks Campground. Reservations are required. The campground is centrally located and offers great views of rock formations. Jumbo Rocks Campsite 20.00 A maximum of six people, three tents, and two cars may occupy an individual campsite, only if there is space available. Some sites only have enough parking for one vehicle. Senior/Access Pass Jumbo Rocks Campsite 10.00 Nightly camping fee for one site for a camper with a Senior or Access pass. A maximum of six people, three tents, and two cars may occupy an individual campsite, only if there is space available. Some sites only have enough parking for one vehicle. Jumbo Rocks Information Board An RV drives past an campground information board. Jumbo Rocks accommodates both RVs and tent camping. There are 124 individual/family sites in this campground. All are first come, first served. Jumbo Rocks Campsite A picnic table and fire pit are in a campsite surrounded by boulders and some vegetation. There are 124 individual/family sites in this campground. All are first come, first served. View from Jumbo Rocks Campground A landscape photograph of rocky outcrops and vegetation. Jumbo Rocks Campground is located in a large boulder field. Skull Rock Nature Trail loops near the campground, leading visitors among the rock features and native plants. Jumbo Rocks Amphitheater Rows of seats are in front of a stage. Behind the stage are large rock formations. Jumbo Rocks Campground has an amphitheater for ranger programs. Jumbo Rocks Campsite and Facilities A campsite with a parking space in front is next to a restroom. Site 122 in Jumbo Rocks Campground is wheelchair accessible. Ryan Campground Ryan Campground has 31 campsites. All campsites are reservation only. The campground is centrally located in the park and is adjacent to the California Riding and Hiking Trail. There are 4 designated equestrian sites and reservations are required. For more equestrian campsites, see Black Rock Campground. There is no water available at Ryan Campground. There are 3 bicycle sites available at $5 per night, with no more than 3 tents and 3 people per campsite. Ryan Individual Campsite 20.00 A maximum of six people, three tents, and two cars may occupy an individual campsite, only if there is space available. Some sites only have enough parking for one vehicle. Ryan Horse Site 15.00 Reservations are required for horse campsites. There are 4 horse sites available. Ryan Bicycle Sites 5.00 Sites 32A, 32B and 32C are for bicyclist, first-come, first-served. They are $5 per person, per night. Three people max and no parking for support vehicles. Senior/Access Pass Ryan Individual Campsite 10.00 Nightly camping fee for one site for a camper with a Senior or Access pass. A maximum of six people, three tents, and two cars may occupy an individual campsite, only if there is space available. Some sites only have enough parking for one vehicle. Senior/Access Pass Ryan Horse Site 7.50 Nightly camping fee for one site for a camper with a Senior or Access pass. Reservations are required for horse campsites. There are 4 horse sites available Senior/Access Pass Ryan Bicycle Campsite 2.50 Nightly camping fee for one site for a camper with a Senior or Access pass. Sites 32A, 32B and 32C are for bicyclist, first-come, first-served. They are $5 per person, per night. Three people max and no parking for support vehicles. Ryan Campground Entrance An unpaved road and campground signage is surrounded by vegetation and rock formations. Ryan Campground has 31 sites including 4 equestrian sites. Ryan Campground Facilities A small wheel chair accessible vault toilet and parking space. Ryan Campground has vault toilets and no water. Ryan Campsite Two tents, a picnic table, fire ring, and Joshua tree are in a campsite. There are 31 campsites at this centrally located campground. Mt. Ryan and Cap Rock are close by attractions. Ryan Campground Horse Camp A sign that reads "Horse Camp". Ryan Campground has 4 equestrian campsites. Reservations for equestrian sites are required. Campsite at Ryan Campground A tent and picnic table are surrounded by a large rock outcrop and vegetation. There are 31 campsites at Ryan Campground. Nearby attractions include Ryan Mountain and Cap Rock. Sheep Pass Group Campground Sheep Pass Group Campground has 6 group campsites and is centrally located within Joshua Tree National Park and is easily accessible to hiking trails and rock climbing routes. All campsites are by reservation only. It is one of three group campgrounds in the park. Towering rock formations and uniquely-shaped Joshua trees surround the facility. There is no water available in the campground. Group Campsite at Sheep Pass 50.00 Sheep Pass has 6 campsites that range in price from $35-50 depending on site capacity. Tents only. RVs and habitable trailers prohibited. Senior/Access Pass Group Campsite at Sheep Pass 25.00 Nightly camping fee for one site for a camper with a Senior or Access pass. Sheep Pass has 6 campsites that range in price from $17.50-25 depending on site capacity. Tents only. RVs and habitable trailers prohibited. Sheep Pass Group Campground Two informational boards at the sheep pass group campground with large rocky outcrops behind them. Sheep Pass Group Campground is centrally located within Joshua Tree National Park and has easy access to hiking trails and rock climbing routes. Campsite at Sheep Pass Group Campground A sign that reads "Group Site 4". Behind are three picnic tables, a fire ring and a fire grate. Sheep Pass is one of three group campgrounds in the park. Facilities at Sheep Pass Group Campground An dirt road and a small paved walking path lead to a vault toilet. Sheep Pass has some amenities including vault toilets, picnic tables and fire rings. There is no water, cell service or a store of any kind at the campground. Sheep Pass Group Campground A landscape view of the campground with a campsite, tents, a parking lot, and a dirt road in view. Towering rock formations and uniquely-shaped Joshua trees surround Sheep Pass Campground. Sheep Pass Campsite A campsite with picnic tables and surrounded by large rocky formations. The campground is surrounded by towering rock formations. White Tank Campground This is small campground with 15 sites. There are pit toilets, picnic tables, and fire pits. There is no water available. RVs and vehicles with trailers may not exceed 25 feet. To secure a site, 1. Locate an empty campsite. 2. Occupy the site (set up a tent or leave personal items to show occupancy). 3. Proceed immediately to an entrance station to complete registration and pay. You must pay for the site within one hour of set up. If entrance stations are closed, payment may be delayed until morning. Individual Campsite at White Tank 15.00 Campsites at White Tank are $15. Camping fees must be paid at an entrance station. A maximum of six people, three tents, and two cars may occupy an individual campsite, only if there is space available. Some sites only have enough parking for one vehicle. Senior/Access Pass Individual Campsite at White Tank 7.50 Nightly camping fee for one site for a camper with a Senior or Access pass. Camping fees must be paid at an entrance station. A maximum of six people, three tents, and two cars may occupy an individual campsite, only if there is space available. Some sites only have enough parking for one vehicle. White Tank Campsite A picnic table and fire pit are in a campsite. Behind them are large boulders. White Tank Campground is nestled among immense granite boulders. The Arch Rock Nature Trail is located here - leading to a spectacular formation. White Tank Two cars are in a small, unpaved parking lot. White tank has 15 sites and limited parking. Campsite at White Tank A picnic table and fire ring are in a campsite that has a view looking out on a boulder field. The view from White Tank looks out over a large boulder field of granitic rock making it a popular campground. Campsite in White Tank Campground A picnic table and fire ring are in a campsite adjacent to a large boulder. There are 15 campsites in White Tank Campground and they are surrounded by boulders. Quail Springs Area at Sunset The sky turns hues of pink and purple over a field of Joshua trees. Quail Springs area at sunset Hidden Valley Hiker hiker looks over Hidden Valley Scrambling to the top of boulders in Joshua Tree can get you a great view. Historic Keys Ranch an historic wood house seen through the missing windshield of an old, rusty vehicle The historic Keys Ranch can be visited only on a ranger-guided tour. Lost Horse Valley Joshua trees grow on a flat plain with boulder outcrops and mountains in the distance Take in views of the park's iconic Joshua trees and rock outcrops in Lost Horse Valley. Joshua Tree Junior Ranger a little girl smiles while wearing a Jr. Ranger hat and badge Kids of all ages can take part in Joshua Tree National Park's Junior Ranger program. Joshua Tree Sunset a fiery sky behind the silhouette of a Joshua tree The wide-open desert of Joshua Tree National Park makes for stunning sunsets. Jumbo Rocks at Sunset people climbing on boulders are silhouetted against a colorful sunset sky Jumbo Rocks Campground is a fun place to explore the park's bouldered landscape. Stars Over the Park Entrance night scene showing stars of the Milky Way over a sign saying "Entering Joshua Tree National Park" Enjoy some of the darkest night skies in Southern California. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Joshua Tree National Park, California Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] rocks and people silhouetted at sunset Fossils in Joshua Tree National parks are special lands that are designated to permanently protect things that are part of our collective heritage like stunning views, unique wildlife, endangered species, areas of recreation, and wilderness. Seventeen national parks in the United States were created partly to protect the fossils found in them. Joshua Tree National Park is one of these! Scientists kneel in the dirt to excavate a mammoth tusk. Homesteaders From 1863 to 1976, United States citizens could claim 160-acre parcels of surveyed lands from the Federal Government under the Homestead Act of 1862 —though not after 1936 in the area that became Joshua Tree National Monument. Claimants had three to five years to "prove up" on their property, which meant completing three criteria: building a small home, improving the land, and growing crops or raising stock and proving they had met the requires. Color photo of wagon wheels in a line at Keys Ranch. NPS / Hannah Schwalbe Lost Horse Mine Even before the California Gold Rush of 1849, prospectors were finding gold in southern California. As the take from the mines in the Sierras petered out, miners fanned out into the deserts. Here hot summers, scarce water, limited wood sources, and the difficulty and high cost of transporting equipment and provisions created a challenging environment in which to operate a mine. Color photo of the wooden structure of Lost Horse Mine against a blue sky. NPS / Kristi Rugg Matt Riley's Fatal Mistake It was 114 degrees (46° C) in the shade and the distance to the nearest spring was 25 miles (40 km) when Matt Riley and Henry Kitto set off on foot from the OK Mine at 9 am. They had one canteen of water between them. Color photo of Matt Riley's gravesite. NPS / Kurt Moses Oasis of Mara In deserts the presence of water, that rarest of desert commodities, allows life to flourish and provides an oasis for natural and human activity. The Oasis of Mara is a cornerstone of the Joshua Tree National Park story. Color photo of California fan palms with a rainbow behind. NPS / Brad Sutton Movies in Joshua Tree Many film and TV productions have taken place in and around Joshua Tree National Park. It is easy to understand why these deserts are a highly sought after filming destination. Color photo of desert landscape at sunset. NPS / Kurt Moses Cowboys of Joshua Tree Cattle grazed throughout the park from the 1870s until 1945. The grazing ratio was about one adult animal to 17 acres. Color photo of bright sunshine obscuring desert landscape. NPS / Brad Sutton Meet our Volunteers: Tom Crochetiere Learn more about Tom's experience as a volunteer at Joshua Tree National Park. Volunteer smiles at the camera. Veteran Story: Patrick Pilcher After a successful military and NPS career, Patrick Pilcher helps visitors connect with the Klondike Gold Rush as a volunteer. A man poses in a volunteer uniform by a door labeled "Klondike Gold Rush" Park Air Profiles - Joshua Tree National Park Air quality profile for Joshua Tree National Park. Gives specific information about air quality and air pollution impacts for Joshua Tree NP as well as the studies and monitoring conducted for Joshua Tree NP. Joshua trees at sunset in Joshua Tree NP World War II Plane Crashes in National Parks During WWII, more than 7,100 air crashes involved US Army Air Force (USAAF) aircraft occurred on American soil. Collectively these crashes resulted in the loss of more than 15,599 lives (Mireles 2006). Many of these military aircraft accidents occurred in remote, often mountainous, areas managed by the National Park Service. plane crash at base of grassy hill Ravens Are you outside? Look up, look around you, and if you don’t spot one immediately, wait a few minutes. Your chances of seeing a common raven, Corvus corax, are very good. These jet-black birds with glossy, iridescent feathers, chisel-shaped black bills, and wingspans of up to four feet are ubiquitous in the Mojave and Colorado deserts. Color photo of a jet black raven sitting atop a very spiky Mojave yucca plant. Tarantula Autumn provides a brief glimpse into the workings of nature in the desert. At no other time is the intimate connection between life and death represented so clearly. One of the species that best embodies this relationship between life and death is the desert tarantula, Aphonopelma iodium. Woman lying on her stomach holding a smartphone to take a photo of a desert tarantula crawling. Wind, earth, and fire: The impacts of anthropogenic air pollution on soils in Joshua Tree National Park Third in a series of three "In Focus" articles that share insights into the near-universal and far-reaching effects of soils on the ecology, management, and enjoyment of our national parks. Annual plant species fill the interspace of creosotebushes at Joshua Tree National Park Draw a Joshua tree The park namesake, the Joshua tree (Yucca brevifolia) is a member of the Agave family. The Joshua tree is a twisty and spiky tree that can seem otherworldly, like it popped out of a book! Follow this step-by-step drawing activity to create your own Joshua Tree. No two Joshua trees look alike, so you can make yours as wacky and creative as you want! Paintings of Joshua Trees propped up outside. From Rock to Small Talk People long ago shared messages by making pictures on rocks. Today we have many other ways that we can communicate. What ways do you share information with your family and friends? Three people start in front of rock art. Create your own Rock Formation Just like you can find shapes in the clouds, people in Joshua Tree find shapes in the giant rock formations. Learn about how rock formations and then create your own. A rock that looks like a giant skull. Create your own Constellation The night sky is a giant story book! People all over the world connect stars into patterns. Create your own constellation and write its story. A Joshua Tree under the night sky Desert Tortoise Activity The desert tortoise has been on the earth for 15 to 20 million years. Learn more about the desert tortoise and how you can help this endangered species. An upclose desert tortoise picture Design your own Adaptable Plant Adaptations are skills which help an animal or plant to survive in their environment. Design your own plant. A bat flying out of a cave Junior Ranger Pledge After you have completed your Junior Ranger Activities you can say the Junior Ranger Pledge! A Junior Ranger gets sworn in by a Park Ranger National Park Service Finds Success at Hiring Event The National Park Service Fire and Aviation Program participated in a hiring event sponsored by the Department of Interior. The special hiring event was held in Bakersfield, CA and was a collaboration of all four natural resource management bureaus to hire open wildland fire positions in 2020. Employees talk to potential job candidates in front of a large promotional panel. Women of the West Women's stories have sometimes been overlooked or actively covered up in historical narratives, especially those concerning westward expansion. But many women made empowered choices to go to (and stay in) the California desert. Two of these women, Frances Keys and Elizabeth Campbell, are especially prominent in Joshua Tree's history. historic photo of a group of people, three standing women and one seated man Keys Ranch Historic District Cultural Landscape The Keys Ranch Historic District is located approximately twenty miles from the park headquarters and visitor center in the town of Twentynine Palms. The landscape is comprised approximately 1,038 acres and contains a wide variety of features including a ranch house, ore milling facilities, ranching compounds, agricultural areas and five dams. Keys used the area primarily as a grazing area with limited agricultural use. Keys Ranch Pacific Border Province The Pacific Border straddles the boundaries between several of Earth's moving plates on the western margin of North America. This region is one of the most geologically young and tectonically active in North America. The generally rugged, mountainous landscape of this province provides evidence of ongoing mountain-building. Drakes Estero in Point Reyes National Seashore. NPS photo/Sarah Codde Save Water: Live Like a Desert Native Water conservation is always important in the desert, but saving water is even more critical during the current period of historic drought in the state of California. We can learn about how to be water-wise by looking to the example of native desert species, which have evolved to cope with rains that are not only scarce but unpredictable. open desert landscape The Adverse Effects of Climate Change on Desert Bighorn Sheep Climate change has and will continue to have a negative impact on the population of desert bighorn sheep. For the remaining herds to survive, management may always be necessary. Protecting wild lands is key to the survival of these amazing animals. Desert bighorn sheep, NPS/Shawn Cigrand Respiratory Disease Outbreak Among Bighorn Sheep in Joshua Tree National Park Bighorn sheep were once common in Southern California and Nevada, but after more than a century of impacts from disease, unregulated hunting, and habitat loss, their numbers were in sharp decline. Since the 1960s, cooperative efforts from state and federal agencies to rebuild the herds were paying off, but now a disease outbreak at Joshua Tree National Park may pose a major threat to the majestic animals. bighorn sheep lamb showing symptoms of disease, with adult bighorn nearby El Niño in a Time of Historic Drought Deserts, by definition, get scant rainfall. Add the effects of a record drought, and it's crucial that desert dwellers and visitors alike focus on conserving water ... even when El Niño brings rains to some parts of California. mud cracks Desert Bighorn Sheep: Connecting a Desert Landscape Desert bighorn sheep live on islands of mountain habitat and use surrounding desert for travel and food. These same desert areas contain a variety of human-made barriers that threaten the area’s individual bighorn herds. Researchers are collecting data that will provide telling information about how we can help support and protect bighorn populations across the Mojave Desert into the future. Up close bighorn sheep standing on top of a large rock. Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display at a visitor center Series: Joshua Tree Virtual Junior Ranger Program By completing the following activities on a sheet of paper at home, you will learn about some of the cultural and natural wonders of Joshua Tree National Park and earn a Junior Ranger badge by mail! A Junior Ranger with their badge and hat. Series: Physiographic Provinces Descriptions of the physiographic provinces of the United States, including maps, educational material, and listings of Parks for each. George B. Dorr, founder of Acadia National Park Series: Park Air Profiles Clean air matters for national parks around the country. Photo of clouds above the Grand Canyon, AZ The Precambrian The Precambrian was the "Age of Early Life." During the Precambrian, continents formed and our modern atmosphere developed, while early life evolved and flourished. Soft-bodied creatures like worms and jellyfish lived in the world's oceans, but the land remained barren. Common Precambrian fossils include stromatolites and similar structures, which are traces of mats of algae-like microorganisms, and microfossils of other microorganisms. fossil stromatolites in a cliff face Quaternary Period—2.58 MYA to Today Massive ice sheets advanced and retreated across North America during much of the Quaternary, carving landscapes in many parks. Bering Land Bridge National Preserve contains geologic evidence of lower sea level during glacial periods, facilitating the prehistoric peopling of the Americas. The youngest rocks in the NPS include the lava of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park and the travertine at Yellowstone National Park, which can be just a few hours old. fossil bone bed and murals of mammoths Neogene Period—23.0 to 2.58 MYA Some of the finest Neogene fossils on the planet are found in the rocks of Agate Fossil Beds and Hagerman Fossil Beds national monuments. fossils on display in a visitor center Plan Like a Park Ranger: Top 10 Tips for Visiting Joshua Tree National Park Visit Joshua Tree National Park like an expert! Check out these top ten tips before your vacation to the California desert. A park ranger jumping through the air, in the background is a field of Joshua trees. Frances Lawton Keys Frances Lawton Keys was part of a wave of Anglo pioneers who came to the arid Southern California desert in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, patching together a variety of ventures on public domain land. Three women stand around a seated man Find Your Park on Route 66 Route 66 and the National Park Service have always had an important historical connection. Route 66 was known as the great road west and after World War II families on vacation took to the road in great numbers to visit the many National Park Service sites in the Southwest and beyond. That connection remains very alive and present today. Take a trip down Route 66 and Find Your Park today! A paved road with fields in the distance. On the road is a white Oklahoma Route 66 emblem. Changing Patterns of Water Availability May Change Vegetation Composition in US National Parks Across the US, changes in water availability are altering which plants grow where. These changes are evident at a broad scale. But not all areas experience the same climate in the same way, even within the boundaries of a single national park. A new dataset gives park managers a valuable tool for understanding why vegetation has changed and how it might change in the future under different climate-change scenarios. Green, orange, and dead grey junipers in red soil, mountains in background Dare to Imagine: Christina Aiello Read about Christina's work with desert bighorn sheep and paving her own path. This article is part of a National Park Foundation funded project called the Dare to Imagine project dedicated to highlighting women in parks who are breaking barriers and showing what a scientist looks like. graphic of a photo of a woman in the field. Text reads Christina Aiello NPF Foundation Women in Landscape-Scale Conservation: Christina Aiello Christina Aiello works a lot with corridor connectivity for desert bighorn sheep, but she explains that no matter what your skillset is, you can contribute to landscape-scale conservation. close up of woman standing in desert Native Conservation Corps Learn about a program for Native American youth to engage in conservation work in national parks and extend their experiences into their communities. Native Conservation Corps members become dual ambassadors between the National Park Service and Native American tribes. From Sea to Shining Sea: "Fossils from Your Public Lands" at the Western Science Center The Western Science Center in Hemet, California serves as a repository for fossils from several land management agencies. It is currently running an exhibit, “Fossils from Your Public Lands”, to showcase examples of these fossils with the cooperation of additional parks and repositories. Photo of a display case and murals inside of a visitor center. Studying the Past and Predicting the Future Using Rat Nests In the western United States, packrat middens are one of the best tools for reconstructing recent environments and climates. These accumulations of plant fragments, small vertebrate remains, rodent droppings, and other fossils can be preserved for more than 50,000 years. Packrat middens have been found in at least 41 National Park Service units. Photo of a wood rat. Series: Park Paleontology News - Vol. 14, No. 2, Fall 2022 All across the park system, scientists, rangers, and interpreters are engaged in the important work of studying, protecting, and sharing our rich fossil heritage. <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/newsletters.htm">Park Paleontology news</a> provides a close up look at the important work of caring for these irreplaceable resources. <ul><li>Contribute to Park Paleontology News by contacting the <a href="https://www.nps.gov/common/utilities/sendmail/sendemail.cfm?o=5D8CD5B898DDBB8387BA1DBBFD02A8AE4FBD489F4FF88B9049&r=/subjects/geoscientistsinparks/photo-galleries.htm">newsletter editor</a></li><li>Learn more about <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/">Fossils & Paleontology</a> </li><li>Celebrate <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossilday/">National Fossil Day</a> with events across the nation</li></ul> Photo of a person sitting while using a laboratory microscope. Series: Geologic Time—Major Divisions and NPS Fossils The National Park System contains a magnificent record of geologic time because rocks from each period of the geologic time scale are preserved in park landscapes. The geologic time scale is divided into four large periods of time—the Cenozoic Era, Mesozoic Era, Paleozoic Era, and The Precambrian. photo of desert landscape with a petrified wood log on the surface Series: Women's History in the Pacific West - Lower Colorado Basin Collection Biographies of women in parks from southern California, southern Nevada, and northwest Arizona Map of southern California, southern Nevada and northwest Arizona Guide to the Henry G. Peabody Photograph Collection Finding aid for the Henry G. Peabody Collection Adaptive Rock Climbing Clinic On November 11 - 13, 2022, Joshua Tree National Park was the site of an adaptive rock climbing clinic. Adaptive climbing makes rock climbing accessible through specialized techniques and equipment. An adaptive rock climber scales a cliff face Joshua Tree National Park to Close Abandoned Mines in Restoration Project Joshua Tree National Park was awarded funds in 2022 as part of the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law (BIL) for multiple projects that address visitor safety and ecosystem restoration. The initial project will close five abandoned gold mines by the spring of 2023. a man in national park service uniform gives a tour of a mine closure National Park Service to Establish Charismatic Megaflora Seedbank The Joshua tree, iconic symbol of the Mojave Desert, is being discussed as an endangered species at both a State and Federal level by the state of California and United States Fish and Wildlife. National Park Service staff collecting Joshua tree fruit Podcast 007: Using Lasers to Remove Graffiti from Rock Art and Rock Imagery Jason Church speaks with Claire Dean of Dean & Associates Conservation Services about using lasers to remove graffiti from rock art. Claire Dean uses laser to clean rock images. Monitoring Desert Bighorn Sheep Desert bighorn sheep are one of the flagship species in Joshua Tree National Park (JTNP). JTNP is important to the range-wide conservation of bighorn sheep because of the highly protected habitat that the park offers. Studies of bighorn genetics have concluded that JTNP is also important as an open corridor connecting adjacent habitats, and as a source of genetic diversity for sheep populations outside the park. A bighorn sheep at Ryan Mountain, Joshua Tree National Park. Air Quality Monitoring Visitors to Joshua Tree National Park expect clean desert air and beautiful views. But though the park is protected in many ways, air pollution ignores boundaries. Haze often obscures mountain vistas, and in hot weather, ozone concentrations sometimes exceed levels safe for people to breathe. Clear view in the direction of Coachella Valley. Mountains are seen in the distance. Weather Monitoring and Climate Change Research Joshua Tree National Park is collaborating with outside scientists to better understand the effects of climate change on plants and animals in the park. Two people working on a weather station Climate Change and Declines in Mojave Desert Bird Diversity Biodiversity in bird communities has declined drastically over the past century in the Mojave Desert, according to a recent landmark study by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley. They found an average 43 percent decline in bird species diversity. Reduced precipitation, a consequence of climate change, seems to be driving the declines. an American kestrel sitting on a Joshua tree The Joshua Tree National Park Herbarium The Joshua Tree National Park Herbarium (and the inventory program that supports it) have contributed to many discoveries over the past 20 years—including seven newly described species. pressed plants with pale yellow flowers. Desert Tortoise Telemetry and Conservation Biologists in Joshua Tree National Park have been collaborating with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to monitor Mojave desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) with radiotelemetry since 2003—one of the longest-running tortoise monitoring programs in the nation. a desert tortoise Groundwater Monitoring Water is one of the scarcest resources in Joshua Tree National Park (JTNP), shaping the Mojave and Colorado desert ecosystems within the park. The park’s surface water and groundwater resources are monitored to understand the impact of climate change on water resources and to identify potential management activities that may help protect natural resources that are threatened by dropping groundwater levels. A windmill with a rusty barrel surrounded by desert landscape Closing Abandoned Mines The legacy of mining is readily visible today. Within the boundaries of what is now a national park are about 300 abandoned mining sites with more than 720 mine openings. Visitors are often intrigued by the idea of exploring old mines, but abandoned mine workings pose a serious resource management challenge for the park. Park Rangers look into an open mine shaft Geographic Information Systems at Joshua Tree National Park The GIS program at Joshua Tree National Park (JTNP) maintains accurate geospatial data for the park, produces high-quality maps, collects and processes a wide variety of data, and supports the effective use of GIS for park management and operations. A parking area and roads in a desert landscape from a bird's eye view. Testing Treatments for Mitigating Climate-Change Effects on Adobe Structures in the National Parks In the US Southwest, climate change is making it harder to preserve historic adobe structures for future generations. Using adobe test walls and rainshower simulators, staff at the Desert Research Learning Center are evaluating the potential for increased erosion, and testing the effectiveness of different treatments methods to protect against it. The results will help park managers tailor their preservation methods to better protect culturally valuable resources. American flag viewed through the remains of an adobe doorway. A Changing Bimodal Climate Zone Means Changing Vegetation in Western National Parks When the climate changes enough, the vegetation communities growing in any given place will also change. Under an expanded bimodal climate zone, some plant communities in western national parks are more likely to change than others. National Park Service ecologists and partners investigated the future conditions that may force some of this change. Having this information can help park managers decide whether to resist, direct, or accept the change. Dark storm clouds and rainbow over mountains and saguaros. 2022 Freeman Tilden Award Recipients View regional recipients of the National Park Service Freeman Tilden Award, which recognizes outstanding contributions to the practice of interpretation and education by a NPS employee. Two women work with a tree while a young man records audio. 50 Nifty Finds #30: So Funny It Hurt Humor is a form of commentary that often reveals serious truths. Cartoonists combine artistic talents with razor-sharp wits to shine light on political and social issues. In most cases, those artists are external observers. In the National Park Service (NPS), employees in the 1960s to 1980s drew cartoons, published in official newsletters, that provide unique insights into NPS organizational culture, working conditions, and employees' concerns—many of which still exist today. A ranger showing a coloring book to a visitor saying that they care about children's education 2022 George and Helen Hartzog Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Service The National Park Service is pleased to congratulate the recipients of the 2022 George and Helen Hartzog Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Service. A montage of photos of volunteers working in a national park. Bats Are in Danger. Here’s How and Why We’re Helping Them. Bats are amazing animals and a formidable force against insect pests, but a nasty fungal disease is killing them. A coordinated national response brings hope. GIF of a bat with big ears in a gloved hand, rotating its head and opening and closing its mouth. Project Profile: Close and Secure 5 Abandoned Mines at Joshua Tree National Park The National Park Service will permanently close two vertical shafts and three horizontal, unprotected passages from visitor entry at Joshua Tree National Park. The project will increase public and wildlife safety, while also improving the health of the surrounding landscape. two people, one in national park service uniform, stand next to a closed abandoned mine Project Profile: Expand Joshua Tree Seed Availability for Parks The National Park Service will identify new Joshua tree habitat under future climate scenarios with potential for Joshua tree augmentation, mitigate risks at these habitats, collect seed, and propagate plants to outplant within the park. Two people in National Park Service uniforms collect seeds from a Joshua Tree I Didn't Know That!: Biological Soil Crusts You’ve heard people say to stay on the trail, but what does it matter in the desert? It’s just dirt... right? Wrong—it's alive! Discover what biological soil crusts are and why they're so important in dry environments. a promo image for "I Didn't Know That! Biological Soil Crusts" with image of a biological soil crust 50 Nifty Finds #38: A Germ of an Idea A lot of articles have been written about the history of the National Park Service (NPS) arrowhead emblem. Many recycle the same content and outdated information that has largely come from the NPS itself. Challenging the traditional story has revealed new sources of information—and two previously overlooked arrowhead designs—that rewrite the arrowhead origin story. Wooden arrowhead plaque on stand How to Collaborate with a Scientist (or Park Interpreter), Illustrated We teamed up with park rangers and researchers to increase opportunities for sharing science. Humorous illustrations show what we learned in the process. Drawing of a woman carrying an alligator. A boy points. A woman holding his hand looks shocked. The Oasis Newsletter: Fall 2023 This biannual newsletter of the Mojave Desert Network Inventory and Monitoring Program features: an intern's summary of her experience working with our vegetation crew; two recent web publications on a nation-wide effort to conserve bats and monitoring vital signs in times of rapid change; outreach to MOJN park web managers to assist in increasing science and research content on their sites; and a variety of staffing updates. Woman with brimmed hat bends down to place a 3-foot tall blue flag along a transect in sagebrush. The Oasis Newsletter: Spring 2021 The Spring 2021 issue of the Mojave Desert Network newsletter bids farewell to our Ecologist and welcomes an Interim Ecologist and three field scientists hired this winter to support our monitoring projects. The newsletter also highlights recent outreach activities and collaborations with park staff, as well as a new project brief and a web article. We feature an article about the Dome Fire that killed an estimated 1.3 million Joshua trees in Mojave National Preserve. National Park Service scientist kneels on soil and filters a water sample from a desert spring. The Oasis Newsletter: Fall 2021 The Fall 2021 issue of the Mojave Desert Network newsletter highlights the recent "inconclusive" detection of a fungus causing bat disease; provides monitoring project updates and schedules; highlights recent project briefs and a data release report; features the network's first virtual science symposium; and summarizes staffing changes. Hiker walks on trail through golden aspen trees. The Oasis Newsletter: Fall 2022 This biannual newsletter of the Mojave Desert Network Inventory and Monitoring Program features: an update column from Allen Calvert, Network Program Manager; highlights from our first in-person science symposium in three years; a new project brief on selected large springs monitoring; outreach efforts in parks; and a variety of staffing updates. Four field staff smile in a selfie after finishing their last monitoring plot. Monitoring Vital Signs in Times of Rapid Change Environmental changes are occurring at increasing rates over the last century in the Mojave Desert. Examples include rising temperature, decreasing precipitation, and more frequent extreme events like wildfire and flooding. Learn more about what we are monitoring in the Mojave Desert Network parks, some early changes we are seeing, and how what we are learning can be used to help managers plan for the future. Two scientists stand over a small spring amidst desert shrubs in Death Valley National Park. The Oasis Newsletter: Spring 2022 In this newsletter, you will find our recent project summary on Desert Springs monitoring, staffing updates, highiights and links for an Inventory and Monitoring Division Scientists' training, a feature on fossil monitoring in Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument, and our spring and summer field schedule. Two scientists use a leveling rod and a digital level to read water channel elevation. The Oasis Newsletter: Spring 2023 This biannual newsletter of the Mojave Desert Network Inventory and Monitoring Program features: updates from regional Inventory & Monitoring Program Managers' meeting, satellite vegetation analysis and bird diversity in Joshua Tree National Park, staffing changes, our spring monitoring schedule, and a few images highlighting recent fieldwork. Woman stands in desert springs vegetation, stretching a meter tape out to monitor it. Mi Parque Mi Historia: Xochitl Lopez Nos dedicamos a resaltar y compartir el rico trasfondo y las diversas experiencias de algunos de nuestros guardabosques de parques nacionales. Al sumergirnos en sus historias, buscamos proporcionar a nuestra comunidad de visitantes del parque más que solo información; aspiramos a fomentar una comprensión más profunda e inspirar conexiones. Guardaparques liderando un recorrido. Desert Varnish Ever wondered what those dark lines were on the rock walls of canyon country? These black, brown, and red streaks are called desert varnish. streaks of black desert varnish on a red rock wall The Oasis Newsletter: Spring 2024 This issue of The Oasis newsletter highlights an upcoming Fall science symposium, a newly published Desert Springs Data Package and Quality Control Summary, a Yuma myotis bat web article, staff arrivals and departures, a first impressions article from Scientists in Parks intern Sofia Elizarraras, good-bye articles from Alison Gause and Avery Sigarroa, our spring and summer monitoring schedule, a new Inventory & Monitoring web page for Lake Mead NRA, and a new logo! Four people hike upslope amidst cacti and a rocky desert landscape.
Joshua Tree National Park National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior The official newspaper February – May 2017 Spring Guide Brittlebush blooms on rocky slopes near Cottonwood Springs Oasis. NPS/Brad Sutton The Desert Unsung IT’S BEEN THIRTY YEARS SINCE THE BAND U2 RELEASED THE JOSHUA Tree in March 1987. It was this album that catapulted the four Irishmen to international stardom; it was this album that drew the curious eyes of a generation to the otherworldly landscapes of the Southern California desert. The iconic back cover photo by Anton Corbijn, showing the band standing near a lone Joshua tree, cemented the association between the park and the album—even though the picture was taken off Highway 190 near Death Valley, about 200 miles north of here. Desert, and roughly half of the park’s 792,510 acres lie in the hotter, drier, and lower-elevation Colorado Desert—a subsection of the Sonoran Desert. Many of the 2 million people who come to Joshua Tree National Park each year are specifically looking for Joshua trees. Something about the bizarre forms of these branching yuccas captures the imagination. There’s no denying the plants are charismatic and a highlight of a trip to the park. From the Turkey Flats backcountry board, for example, you can look across vast sweeps of undeveloped wilderness to the Coxcomb Mountains, 25 miles distant. Creosote bush and white bursage are the dominant shrubs growing in this huge basin. There isn’t a single Joshua tree in sight, but the Colorado Desert you’re standing in has charismatic trees of its own. One great way to round out your park visit is to make sure you spend time in both the Mojave and the Colorado Deserts. Even if you have only a short time in the park, head for the Pinto Basin and stop at one of the pullouts along the road. Step out of your car. Soak in the silence and admire the immensity of the vista before you. They aren’t the only highlight, though. VisitorsColorado Desert who travel through only the northwestern partMojave of Desert Transition Zone the park, where Joshua trees grow, are missing out: our namesake plants are found only in the Mojave Welcome to your park. I just wanted to take a moment and welcome you to Southern California’s national park. Joshua Tree is the iconic symbol of the Mojave Desert. This year you are joining millions of people from around the globe who will experience the diverse, inspiring scenery that stretches across the Dry washes are a great place to look for trees like Joshua Tree National Park ironwood, smoketree, and blue palo verde. Their seeds sprout after being tumbled and bounced with …continued on p. 10 park. As you discover the desert, I would encourage you to also explore the neighboring landscapes that are preserved Joshua Tree Visitor Center for your enjoyment and that of generations Oasis Visitor Center to come. In addition to our northern Black Rock Nature Center Mojave M N D R E A S F A U L T N A Ch ihu N D R E A AN A S F ah ua take some time to visit the millions of U L T CO LO RA DO D E ES RT Cottonwood Visitor Center acres of public lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management and the US Forest Service. Our newest neighbor to the east—Sand to Snow National Monument—links Joshua Tree to the wild slopes of Mt. San Gorgonio. To the north, Mojave Trails National Monument interprets prehistoric cultures as well as SE n A TR S SI TI Colorado Desert N N A Sonoran and Death Valley National Park, please E N A V DE sister parks at Mojave National Preserve T O S Joshua Tree O JA E R SE ZO Great Basin A LE VE L Route 66. The Colorado Desert is a subsection of the larger Sonoran Desert (left). The transition zone between the Colorado and Mojave Deserts hosts a wealth of biological diversity and is home to species characteristic of both deserts (right). Living in the west, we are truly lucky to have so many wonderful natural and Visiting on the Wing Fragments of the Past Safety; Rules & Regulations … p. 2 Springtime brings visitors of all types to Joshua How can the fossilized bones of extinct Tree, including not just humans but also our animals and artifacts left by past people help Hiking Trails … p. 4 feathered friends. Find out why birds not us understand how climate change may typically found in the desert show up here every affect Joshua Tree’s future? Take a look at spring. Get tips on where to spot commonly how scientists use fossils to reconstruct past (and not so commonly) seen species. Whether environments, learn about the creatures who you’re completely new to birdwatching or are once roamed this landscape, and discover how Night Sky Almanac ... p. 10 an advanced birder, the park’s birds are sure the environment shapes plants, animals, and Weather Information ... p. 11 to catch your eye, as Park Ranger Beth Hudick humans. Brad Sutton digs into what we have explains on p. 8. discov
Joshua Tree Guide National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Joshua Tree National Park A planning guide for visitors to Joshua Tree National Park 2014 Photo by Stacy Manson At first glance, the desert seems lifeless and barren. However, a closer look reveals a landscape teeming with life, providing a home for hundreds of species. Joshua Tree National Park is comprised of two distinct desert environments the Mojave and the Colorado deserts. Joshua trees dwell in the higher elevations of the Mojave, while creosote bushes, cholla cactus, and ocotillo dominate the lower Colorado. A changing landscape greets you at every turn. Joshua tree forests intermingle with immense boulder outcroppings. Reminders of ancestral peoples combine with the remains of mining infrastructure and pioneer homes. On your journey through the park, examine the transitions you see, feel the struggles of survival in an unforgiving place, and discover the subtle beauty of the desert. Hello and Welcome to Joshua Tree National Park! Ocotillos in bloom. NPS Photo Experience Joshua Tree National Park Take a Drive Explore Park Boulevard and the Pinto Basin Road. Take the spur to Keys View for incredible panoramic views. A park map is located on pages 4 & 5. Get Active Take a hike, walk a nature trail, ride a bike, go rock-climbing. Opportunities to get your heart pumping are almost limitless. Trails are listed on page 5. Relax, Reflect, and Recharge Take a moment to disconnect from the outside world. Think about what brought you here and what this place means to you. Emergencies Call 909-383-5651, dial 911, or contact a park ranger. Cell phone coverage in the park is limited. Table of Contents Information Rock Formations Maps, Programs, & Hiking Camping & Trip Planning Backcountry Travel & Activities Black Rock Canyon 2-3 3 4 6 6-7 7 Visitor Center Hours Oasis Joshua Tree Cottonwood Black Rock Daily (except Fridays) Fridays 9 am – 5 pm 8 am – 5 pm 9 am – 4 pm October – May 8 am – 4 pm Noon – 8 pm It is our goal to ensure you have a safe and fulfilling experience when enjoying this unique landscape. The weather varies greatly with the seasons, so be prepared and always carry water. Please keep your distance from wildlife – the animals are wild. I have found through my work here that we all can find adventures, challenges, and unforgettable experiences while enjoying the park. It is my sincere hope that you have a safe, enjoyable, and memorable time during your visit to Joshua Tree National Park. joshua tree national park 74485 national park drive twentynine palms, ca 92277 Attend a Ranger Program Interested in learning more about Joshua Tree National Park? Join park rangers and volunteers who know it inside and out. Walks and programs listed on page 4. Visiting Joshua Tree National Park will provide you with an opportunity to experience an environment completely different from what you might ordinarily see – the uniqueness, diversity and grandeur of two desert ecosystems found in the “California Desert.” With close examination, you will find subtle and intense beauty like no other. Mark Butler, Superintendent Joshua Tree National Park Important Information Park Information getting to the park The park is located about 140 miles east of Los Angeles via I–10. Entrances to the park are located off CA HWY 62 (Twentynine Palms Highway), at the towns of Joshua Tree and Twentynine Palms. A third entrance is located about 25 miles east of Indio, via I–10. international visitors Park information is available at visitor centers and entrance stations in Dutch, French, German, Italian, Japanese, and Spanish. entrance fees Admission to the park is $15 per vehicle and is good for seven consecutive days. An annual Joshua Tree Pass may be purchased for $30 and a National Parks and Federal Recreation Lands Pass, costs $80 (free to active US military). Both are good for 12 months. A Senior Pass may be purchased by any U.S. citizen 62 or older for $10, and it is good for life. For Your Safety food, lodging, services There are no concessions within the park. However, surrounding communities can fulfill most visitor needs. lost & found Report lost, and turn in found, items at any visitor center or ranger station. Lost articles will be returned if found. accessibility The nature trails at Bajada, Cap Rock, and the Oasis of Mara are accessible. Keys View is accessible and Site 122 at Jumbo Rocks Campground is wheelchair accessible. wildflowers Spring blooming periods vary with elevation, temperature, and the amount of moisture in the soil. You can find current information on the park website: www.nps.gov/jotr. visitor centers Oasis Visitor Center (9 am - 5 pm) is located in Twentynine Palms. Joshua Tree Visitor Center, (8 am - 5 pm) is located in Joshua Tree Village. Cottonwood Visitor Center (9 am - 4 pm) serves the southern entrance. Black Rock Nature Center (Monday to Thursday 8 am - 4 pm; Friday noon - 8 pm) is open Octobe

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