"Haleakalā Crater" by A. Rulison/ NPS Photo , public domain

Haleakalā

National Park - Hawaiʻi

Haleakalā National Park is located on the island of Maui in the state of Hawaii. The park is named after Haleakalā, a dormant volcano within its boundaries. The name Haleakalā is Hawaiian for "house of the sun." According to a local legend, the demigod Maui imprisoned the sun here in order to lengthen the day. The park features the dormant Haleakalā (East Maui) Volcano, which last erupted sometime between 1480 and 1600 AD. The park is divided into two distinct sections: the summit area and the coastal Kipahulu area.

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maps

Official visitor map of Haleakalā National Park (NP) in Hawaiʻi. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Haleakalā - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Haleakalā National Park (NP) in Hawaiʻi. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Lualailua Hills Quadrangle in Maui County, Hawaii. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - HI Maui - Lualailua Hills 2017

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Lualailua Hills Quadrangle in Maui County, Hawaii. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Kaupo Quadrangle in Maui County, Hawaii. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - HI Maui - Kaupo 2017

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Kaupo Quadrangle in Maui County, Hawaii. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Kipahulu Quadrangle in Maui County, Hawaii. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - HI Maui - Kipahulu 2017

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Kipahulu Quadrangle in Maui County, Hawaii. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Kilohana Quadrangle in Maui County, Hawaii. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - HI Maui - Kilohana 2017

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Kilohana Quadrangle in Maui County, Hawaii. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Nahiku Quadrangle in Maui County, Hawaii. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - HI Maui - Nahiku 2017

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Nahiku Quadrangle in Maui County, Hawaii. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Hana Quadrangle in Maui County, Hawaii. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).US Topo 7.5-minute - HI Maui - Hana 2017

US Topo 7.5-minute map of Hana Quadrangle in Maui County, Hawaii. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

Driving Map of Maui in Hawaii. Published by the Maui Visitors & Convention Bureau.Maui - Driving Map

Driving Map of Maui in Hawaii. Published by the Maui Visitors & Convention Bureau.

Vintage map of Hawaiian Islands - Maui 1951. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).Maui - Vintage USGS Map - Maui 1951

Vintage map of Hawaiian Islands - Maui 1951. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

https://www.nps.gov/hale/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haleakal%C4%81_National_Park Haleakalā National Park is located on the island of Maui in the state of Hawaii. The park is named after Haleakalā, a dormant volcano within its boundaries. The name Haleakalā is Hawaiian for "house of the sun." According to a local legend, the demigod Maui imprisoned the sun here in order to lengthen the day. The park features the dormant Haleakalā (East Maui) Volcano, which last erupted sometime between 1480 and 1600 AD. The park is divided into two distinct sections: the summit area and the coastal Kipahulu area. This special place vibrates with stories of ancient and modern Hawaiian culture and protects the bond between the land and its people. The park also cares for endangered species, some of which exist nowhere else. Come visit this special place - renew your spirit amid stark volcanic landscapes and sub-tropical rain forest with an unforgettable hike through the backcountry. Located on the island of Maui, Haleakalā National Park extends from the 10,023 foot (3055m) summit of Haleakalā down the southeast flank of the mountain to the Kīpahulu coast near Hana. These two sections of the park are not directly connected by road, but both can be reached from Kahului. There are no gas stations within the park. Haleakalā Visitor Center About a 30 minute drive from the Headquarters Visitor Center, the Haleakalā Visitor Center is perched on the edge of the impressive volcanic valley. Inside, park staff can answer questions at the information desk. Visitors can learn about the history of the mountain through various displays. There is also a Hawaiʻi Pacific Parks Association bookstore with souvenirs available for purchase. Restrooms are located nearby in a separate building and are open 24/7. Please check the alerts page for any closures. Haleakalā Visitor Center is 10 miles (16 km) past the Headquarters Visitor Center on the main park road. The driving time between the two Visitor Centers is approximately 30 minutes. Headquarters Visitor Center The Headquarters Visitor Center is 1 mile (1.6 km) past the Summit District entrance gate. Inside, park staff can answer questions at the information desk. A small exhibit hall features displays on the park's natural and cultural history. Restrooms are accessible from the outside and open 24/7. Please check park alerts for information on closures. When entering the park, the Headquarters Visitor Center is on the right about 1 mile (1.6 km) after passing the Summit District entrance gate. Kīpahulu Visitor Center Located at the coastal Kīpahulu District. Information desk, exhibits on natural and cultural history, and a Hawaiʻi Pacific Parks Association bookstore inside. Restrooms are open 24 hours per day, 7 days per week, except when the park is closed during severe weather events. Please check park alerts for information on closures. Hosmer Grove Campground Hosmer Grove lies in the cloud belt of Haleakalā, just below the 7,000 foot level (2134m) in the Summit District. Be prepared for rain and cold weather. Nighttime temperatures can drop into the to near freezing (0°C); daytime highs average 50-65°F (10-18°C). The campground has picnic tables, barbeque grills, drinking water, and pit toilets. Overnight stays are limited to three (3) nights total for all Park areas in a thirty day period. Pets are not permitted in or around campsite facilities. Reservation Fee - Per Night 5.00 Fee to reserve 1 campsite for 1 night at Hosmer Grove. Entrance Fee - Per Vehicle 30.00 All park visitors are required to purchase a 3-day Entrance Pass at the Entrance Gate upon arrival to the park. The campsite reservation does not cover your Entrance Pass. An automated entrance pass machine is available after hours. Hosmer Grove Campground Area A gray tent is pitched next to a grill and picnic table. Tall shrubs and grass line the area. Immerse yourself in the native shrubland of Haleakalā. Kīpahulu Campground The Kīpahulu campground is about 1/8 mile (.2km) south of the Kīpahulu Visitor Center. It overlooks ocean cliffs and is a short walk from 'Ohe'o Gulch. The campground has picnic tables, BBQ grills, and pit toilets. No water is available at Kīpahulu Campground; However, drinking water is available at the Kīpahulu Visitor Center restrooms. There are two general stores in the nearby town of Hāna (10 miles [16km] away) where you can purchase water and basic food supplies. Campsite Fee 8.00 Fee for a single campsite reservation. Entrance Fee 30.00 All park visitors are required to purchase a recreational use pass upon entering Haleakalā National Park. Passes are non-transferable and are valid for 3 days including the date of purchase. A variety of park passes cover park entrance fees. $30.00 per private vehicle - Valid for 3 days. $25 per motorcycle - Valid for 3 days. $15.00 per pedestrian or bicycle - Valid for 3 days. A variety of annual passes are also available, see https://www.nps.gov/hale/planyourvisit/fees.htm for details. Kīpahulu Campground Site A green tent is pitched next to a raised grill on a grassy area. Trees cast some shade from behind. Find a home away from home at a Kīpahulu campsite. Kīpahulu Coastal Campground Site A green picnic table sits in a grassy campsite with the rocky ocean shoreline in the background. Enjoy the sounds of the ocean in a Kīpahulu coastal site. Wilderness Cabins Located on the island of Maui, Haleakalā National Park maintains three wilderness cabins for visitor use-- Hōlua, Palikū, and Kapalaoa. All cabins are accessible only by trail from the summit area and require you to hike a minimum of 3.7 mi (5.9 km). Entrance Fee - Per Vehicle 30.00 All park visitors are required to purchase a 3-day Entrance Pass at the Entrance Gate upon arrival to the park. A Wilderness cabin reservation does not cover your Entrance Pass. An automated entrance pass machine is available after hours. Reservation Fee - Per Night 75.00 Fee to reserve 1 Wilderness cabin for 1 night in the Haleakalā crater. Palikū Wilderness Cabin a rustic building with tall cliff and greenery surrounding picnic table in foreground Palikū Wilderness cabin requires the longest hike to reach at 9.3 miles Kapalaoa Wilderness Cabin brown building at base of sloping cliff with greenery and blue sky Kapalaoa Wilderness cabin requires a 5.6 mile hike from the Keoneheʻeheʻe Trailhead. Hōlua Wilderness Cabin building sits at base of cliff in the distance with clouds rolling over hills in background Hōlua Wilderness cabin requires the shortest hike of 3.7 miles. Wilderness Tent Sites There are two primitive wilderness tent areas which are accessible only by trail, Hōlua and Palikū. These sites are only reservable on recreation.gov. No first come-first serve sites are available. Entrance Fee - Per Vehicle 30.00 All park visitors are required to purchase a 3-day Entrance Pass at the Entrance Gate upon arrival to the park. The campsite reservation does not cover your Entrance Pass. An automated entrance pass machine is available after hours. Rec.Gov Service Fee 8.00 When making a reservation online with rec.gov, users will incur an $8.00 service fee. If making reservations using the rec.gov call center, users will incur a $9.00 service fee. Hōlua group campsite 5 orange tent set up in grassy area with mist and clouds in background Hōlua group site allows a maximum of 4 tents and 10 people. Hōlua tent site 1 orange tent on gravel surface behind brown stake reading 1 and 2 Hōlua tent site 1 is surrounded by a short, rock wall on one side Palikū tent site 1 camper setting up tent in grassy area with mountain peak in background Palikū tent sites are located in a grassy field. 'Ahinahina blooms in Haleakala crater 'Ahinahina blooms in Haleakala crater 'Ahinahina silversword blooms in Haleakala crater Waimoku Waterfall Waimoku waterfall in the park's Kipahulu District Waimoku waterfall in the park's Kipahulu District The Pools of ?Ohe?o in the park's Kipahulu District The Pools of ?Ohe?o in the park's Kipahulu District The Pools of ?Ohe?o in the park's Kipahulu District Sunset Over the Crater Sun setting over the volcano crater and horizon The sun is setting over the volcano crater and horizon at Haleakela. 2019 Connecting with our Homelands Awardees Hopa Mountain, in partnership with the National Park Service, is pleased to announce the 2019 awardees of the Connecting with our Homelands travel grants. Twenty-one Indigenous organizations, schools, and nonprofits have been awarded travel funds for trips to national park units across 12 states/territories within the United States. An elder and young student talk while sitting on a rock. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Haleakalā National Park, Hawai'i Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. Haleakala volcanic landscape Veteran Story: Patrick Pilcher After a successful military and NPS career, Patrick Pilcher helps visitors connect with the Klondike Gold Rush as a volunteer. A man poses in a volunteer uniform by a door labeled "Klondike Gold Rush" Park Air Profiles - Haleakalā National Park Air quality profile for Haleakalā National Park. Gives park-specific information about air quality and air pollution impacts for Haleakalā NP as well as the studies and monitoring conducted for Haleakalā NP. 'I'iwi, a bird of the honeycreeper family, on māmane tree Climate Change Clues from Monitoring As climate changes, significant changes in weather conditions impact the natural environment by shifting patterns of precipitation, promoting extremes in storm behavior, and influencing bird migration, invasive species spread, coral reef decline, and much more. The Pacific Island Network (PACN) undertakes systematic long-term monitoring of a wide variety of natural resources to accurately determine if change is occurring and why. Precipitation seen over the lush valleys of Kalaupapa National Historical Park. Stream Life in Hawai‘i National Parks Changes in weather patterns affect the quantity and quality of the water, which has profound effects on our native stream animals. In the Hawaiian Islands, the total amount of rain is expected to decrease as the impacts of climate change manifest. A stream cascading through green vegetation Early Detection Pilot Studies Pacific Islands Inventory & Monitoring Network performs an early detection pilot study at Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park and Haleakalā National Park to document the presence of non-native and invasive plant species. I&M is evaluating the effectiveness of this study to enhance the Early Detection of Invasive Plants protocol and the feasibility of instituting early detection at a larger scale throughout these and other the Pacific island national parks. Monitoring invasive kahili ginger at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Building Capacity for Rare Plants in Hawai‘i The National Park Service at Haleakalā and Hawai‘i Volcanoes have combined resources and know-how to give three dozen species a fighting chance to remain viable in the midst of climate change. Two observers admire a rare flowering Trematolobelia wimmeri, endemic to Hawai‘i National Parks Defend America's Coast During World War II Many national park sites joined the war effort in World War II by erecting Aircraft Warning, radio and radar stations. Some historic forts came to life with coastal defenses ready to defend the nation. color photo of explosion atop a fort wall, ocean beyond Holo Mai Pele (The Journey of Pele) The storied journey of the volcano deity Pele to her home in Halemaʻumaʻu crater on the island of Hawaiʻi National Park Service Commemoration of the 19th Amendment In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the passing of the 19th Amendment the National Park Service has developed a number of special programs. This includes online content, exhibits, and special events. The National Park Service’s Cultural Resources Geographic Information Systems (CRGIS) announces the release of a story map that highlights some of these programs and provides information for the public to locate and participate. Opening slide of the 19th Amendment NPS Commemoration Story Map Civilian Conservation Corps Haleakalā Crater Trails District Cultural Landscape The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) Haleakala Crater Trails District is located in Haleakala Crater. The trail system was designed by NPS landscape architects, with construction and improvements made by CCC crews between 1930 and 1941. The trails blends in with the surrounding environment through the use of native materials. A hiker stands on a straight, sandy trail cleared through low vegetation in a crater basin. Haleakalā Highway Cultural Landscape The Haleakala Highway is a 37-mile road from the Maui town of Kahului to the summit of Haleakala. The Haleakala Highway cultural landscape is a historic district that includes the 10.6 miles within Haleakala National Park, as well as development nodes along its route. Along its entire course, the highway climbs to 10,000’ from sea level, attaining this height in a shorter distance than any other road in the world, and provides access and views of the Haleakala Crater. Haleakala Highway Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display at a visitor center Series: Park Air Profiles Clean air matters for national parks around the country. Photo of clouds above the Grand Canyon, AZ Quaternary Period—2.58 MYA to Today Massive ice sheets advanced and retreated across North America during much of the Quaternary, carving landscapes in many parks. Bering Land Bridge National Preserve contains geologic evidence of lower sea level during glacial periods, facilitating the prehistoric peopling of the Americas. The youngest rocks in the NPS include the lava of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park and the travertine at Yellowstone National Park, which can be just a few hours old. fossil bone bed and murals of mammoths Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display in a visitor center Tracking the Spread of Avian Malaria within Haleakalā National Park Scientists with the National Park Service Pacific Island Inventory & Monitoring Network (PACN) and US Geological Survey (USGS) Pacific Island Ecosystems Research Center recently teamed up to answer a pressing question: how prevalent is avian malaria in Haleakalā National Park? USGS scientists had tackled the question once before in 2002. But this time, they suspected they might find very different answers. Finger holding open the wing of a honeycreeper getting it's blood tested for avian malaria. Scientists Examine Why Some Pacific Islands National Parks Have More Non-native Plants than Others Invasive non-native species represent one of the main threats to vulnerable island biodiversity. But why do some national parks in the Pacific Islands have more non-native plant species than others? Scientists examined how native plant communities, environment, and geography are associated with non-native plant species invasion across national parks in the Pacific islands to help understand this threat. Yellow flowers of non-native Kahili ginger blanket a forest floor. The First Woman Ranger at Hawai’i National Park Yellowstone wasn’t the only park to have a woman ranger in 1922. That same year, M. Lydia Barrette became the first temporary women ranger at Hawai’i National Park (now Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park and Haleakalā National Park). Lydia Barrett 1922 Substitute Rangers As the 1940s dawned, the United States was still dealing with the economic woes of the Great Depression and trying not to get drawn in WWII. Even as it continued to manage New Deal Program work in national and state parks, the NPS remained understaffed as a government bureau. The emergency relief workers and about 15 percent of NPS staff enlisted or were drafted during the first couple of years of WWII. Winifred Tada, 1940. (Courtesy of the Honolulu Star-Bulletin) Volcanic Craters Craters are present at many volcanic vents. The size and shape of volcanic craters vary a great deal from volcano to volcano, and they even change during the lifespan of an active volcano. Craters can become filled by lava domes or lava flows, and new craters may form during subsequent eruptions. cinder cone crater Magmatic Eruptions Magmatic eruptions include fresh lava or tephra from a magma source. Magmatic eruptions range from quiet effusions of lava to extremely explosive eruptions that can blow apart mountains and send ash clouds around the globe. volcanic eruption with glowing lava seen at night Shield Volcanoes Shield volcanoes are typically very large volcanoes with very gentle slopes made up of basaltic lava flows. Mauna Loa and Kilauea in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park are shield volcanoes. diagram of a shield volcano with lava features Cinder Cones Cinder cones are typically simple volcanoes that consist of accumulations of ash and cinders around a vent. Sunset Crater Volcano and Capulin Volcano are cinder cones. photo of a dry grassy field with a cinder cone in the distance Series: Volcanic Features Volcanoes vary greatly in size and shape. Volcanoes also may have a variety of other features, which in turn, have a great range in diversity of form, size, shape, and permanence. Many volcanoes have craters at their summits and/or at the location of other vents. Some craters contain water lakes. Lakes of molten or solidified lava may exist on some volcanoes. Fumaroles and other geothermal features are a product of heat from magma reservoirs and volcanic gases. photo of a lava lake in a summit crater Series: Volcano Types Volcanoes vary in size from small cinder cones that stand only a few hundred feet tall to the most massive mountains on earth. photo of a volcanic mountain with snow and ice Mosquitoes on Maui As you spend your days exploring Maui, you are likely to experience a couple notable distractions from the island’s native sights and sounds: buzzing and biting from mosquitoes. On Maui these insects are more than just an average outdoor nuisance—they are causing irreversible damage to the island’s ecology. Striped mosquito resting on brown surface with green background Time Is Running Out: Maui’s Forest Birds Will Go Extinct without Action The island of Maui is known for beautiful sand beaches, rich Hawaiian culture, and stunning biodiversity, but the island is at risk of losing one of its most iconic features – the native forest birds, a group of species found nowhere else on earth. A small red and black bird with a curved orange beak sits on a green leaved branch Series: Volcanic Eruption Types The most fundamental way to characterize a volcanic eruption is whether it is magmatic, phreatic, or phreatomagmatic. volcanic eruption seen at a distance Series: Geologic Time—Major Divisions and NPS Fossils The National Park System contains a magnificent record of geologic time because rocks from each period of the geologic time scale are preserved in park landscapes. The geologic time scale is divided into four large periods of time—the Cenozoic Era, Mesozoic Era, Paleozoic Era, and The Precambrian. photo of desert landscape with a petrified wood log on the surface Department of the Interior Announces Multiagency Strategy for Preventing Imminent Extinction of Hawaiʻi Forest Birds Efforts to conserve endangered species strengthened by President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law. A black and yellow speckled bird on a branch The Time Is Now: Saving Maui’s Honeycreepers Before It Is Too Late Within the next ten years, many native Hawaiian honeycreeper species will be pushed to extinction by the uncontrolled spread of avian malaria—but it’s not too late to save them! A brown and orange bird stands on top of a wooden branch. Experiencing a Health Victory While Exploring Haleakalā Sierra Needles tells her inspiring park story experiencing a health victory while exploring Haleakalā. A close-up of the inside of the crater Perimeter Fencing at Three Hawaiʻi Parks to be Reconstructed Through GAOA Funding to Protect Unique Park Ecosystems Three Hawaiʻi National Parks, with funding through the Great American Outdoors Act, will reconstruct approximately 64 miles of perimeter exclusionary fencing segments most likely to fail. Perimeter exclusionary fencing is a type of fencing used to keep invasive animals outside of protected areas and continues to be an effective tool used to support the protection of those area’s ecosystems from damage. A wire fence running along rocky terrain Q and A with NPS Filmmaker David Ehrenberg Get to know NPS filmmaker David Ehrenberg is this Q and A session! Cameraman stands on far left pointing a large black camera towards two people amongs green trees. Travel Blog: The Pacific Islands Writing Prompt: Travel Blog written by Audrey Nelson for "A Day in the Life of a Fellow" Article Series. Audrey is a NPS Workforce Management Fellow, in partnership with Northwest Youth Corps Map of the Pacific Islands NPS Staff and Interns Learn, Engage, and Connect at The Corps Network's Annual Conference From March 7-9, 2023, the National Park Service Youth Programs Division, along with several regional youth and volunteer program managers park staff, and interns attended The Corps Network’s annual National Conference in-person. The conference included informative workshops, inspiring plenary sessions, and networking opportunities. Group of individuals at a conference Project Profile: Collect Seed for Resilient Pacific Islands The National Park Service is collaborating with a range of partner organizations to coordinate native seed collection for ecosystem restoration and rare species conservation in Pacific Island parks. Seeds will be collected and curated for use in species reintroduction and conservation efforts, post-fire restoration, and to develop sustainable seed supply chains for island parks. a plant nursery with various native plants Project Profile: Address Impacts of Avian Malaria in Hawaii The National Park Service, in partnership with many other agencies and organizations, will suppress invasive mosquito populations through biocontrol to reduce avian malaria and prevent the extinction of several federally threatened and endangered native forest bird populations at Haleakala National Park. a yellow Hawaiian bird with curved beak perches on a branch

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