"Autumn - Heintooga Ridge Road" by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

Great Smoky Mountains

National Park - NC, TN

Great Smoky Mountains National Park straddles the border between North Carolina and Tennessee. The sprawling landscape encompasses lush forests and an abundance of wildflowers that bloom year-round. Streams, rivers and waterfalls appear along hiking routes that include a segment of the Appalachian Trail. An observation tower tops Clingmans Dome, the highest peak, offering scenic views of the mist-covered mountains.

location

maps

Tail Map of Appalachian National Scenic Trail (NST) in Connecticut, Georgia, Massachusetts, Maryland, Maine, North Carolina, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, Vermont, West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Appalachian - Trail Map

Tail Map of Appalachian National Scenic Trail (NST) in Connecticut, Georgia, Massachusetts, Maryland, Maine, North Carolina, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, Vermont, West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official Visitor Map of Trail of Tears National Historic Trail (NHT) in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Trail of Tears - Trail Map

Official Visitor Map of Trail of Tears National Historic Trail (NHT) in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Recreation Map of Great Smoky Mountains National Park (NP) in North Carolina and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Great Smoky Mountains - Recreation Map

Recreation Map of Great Smoky Mountains National Park (NP) in North Carolina and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official Visitor Map of Great Smoky Mountains National Park (NP) in North Carolina and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Great Smoky Mountains - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Great Smoky Mountains National Park (NP) in North Carolina and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Trail Map of Great Smoky Mountains National Park (NP) in North Carolina and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Great Smoky Mountains - Trail Map

Trail Map of Great Smoky Mountains National Park (NP) in North Carolina and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official Visitor Map of Blue Ridge Parkway (PKWY) in North Carolina and Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Blue Ridge - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Blue Ridge Parkway (PKWY) in North Carolina and Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

North Carolina State Transportation Map. Published by the North Carolina Department of TransportationNorth Carolina - North Carolina State Map

North Carolina State Transportation Map. Published by the North Carolina Department of Transportation

brochures

Trail Map of Great Smoky Mountains National Park in North Carolina and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Great Smoky Mountains - Trail Map

Trail Map of Great Smoky Mountains National Park in North Carolina and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Recreation Map of Great Smoky Mountains National Park in North Carolina and Tennessee. Published by the recreationlinks.org.Great Smoky Mountains - Recreation Map

Recreation Map of Great Smoky Mountains National Park in North Carolina and Tennessee. Published by the recreationlinks.org.

Official Spring Visitor Guide to Great Smoky Mountains National Park in North Carolina and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Great Smoky Mountains - Spring 2024

Official Spring Visitor Guide to Great Smoky Mountains National Park in North Carolina and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official Winter Visitor Guide to Great Smoky Mountains National Park in North Carolina and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Great Smoky Mountains - Winter 2023/2024

Official Winter Visitor Guide to Great Smoky Mountains National Park in North Carolina and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official Summer Visitor Guide to Great Smoky Mountains National Park in North Carolina and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Great Smoky Mountains - Fall Summer 2023

Official Summer Visitor Guide to Great Smoky Mountains National Park in North Carolina and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official Summer Visitor Guide to Great Smoky Mountains National Park in North Carolina and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Great Smoky Mountains - Guide Summer 2023

Official Summer Visitor Guide to Great Smoky Mountains National Park in North Carolina and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Birds of Great Smoky Mountains National Park in North Carolina and Tennessee. Published by the Great Smoky Mountains Association.Great Smoky Mountains - Birds

Birds of Great Smoky Mountains National Park in North Carolina and Tennessee. Published by the Great Smoky Mountains Association.

Butterflies of Great Smoky Mountains National Park in North Carolina and Tennessee. Published by the Great Smoky Mountains Association.Great Smoky Mountains - Butterflies

Butterflies of Great Smoky Mountains National Park in North Carolina and Tennessee. Published by the Great Smoky Mountains Association.

Mammals of Great Smoky Mountains National Park in North Carolina and Tennessee. Published by the Great Smoky Mountains Association.Great Smoky Mountains - Mammals

Mammals of Great Smoky Mountains National Park in North Carolina and Tennessee. Published by the Great Smoky Mountains Association.

Pollinators of Great Smoky Mountains National Park in North Carolina and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Great Smoky Mountains - Pollinators

Pollinators of Great Smoky Mountains National Park in North Carolina and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Reptiles and Amphibians of Great Smoky Mountains National Park in North Carolina and Tennessee. Published by the Great Smoky Mountains Association.Great Smoky Mountains - Reptiles and Amphibians

Reptiles and Amphibians of Great Smoky Mountains National Park in North Carolina and Tennessee. Published by the Great Smoky Mountains Association.

Brochure of World Heritage Sites in the United States. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park Service - World Heritage Sites

Brochure of World Heritage Sites in the United States. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/grsm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Smoky_Mountains_National_Park Great Smoky Mountains National Park straddles the border between North Carolina and Tennessee. The sprawling landscape encompasses lush forests and an abundance of wildflowers that bloom year-round. Streams, rivers and waterfalls appear along hiking routes that include a segment of the Appalachian Trail. An observation tower tops Clingmans Dome, the highest peak, offering scenic views of the mist-covered mountains. Ridge upon ridge of forest straddles the border between North Carolina and Tennessee in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. World renowned for its diversity of plant and animal life, the beauty of its ancient mountains, and the quality of its remnants of Southern Appalachian mountain culture, this is America's most visited national park. Plan your visit today! Great Smoky Mountains National Park straddles the borders of the states of Tennessee and North Carolina. The three main entrances to the park are in Gatlinburg, TN; Townsend, TN; and Cherokee, NC. Cades Cove Visitor Center Roughly half-way through the Cades Cove Loop Road, pause to speak with park staff and visit various exhibits. Learn about Southern Mountain life and culture, and see a gristmill (operates spring through fall), the Becky Cable house, and other historic structures. Enjoy seasonal ranger-led activities and peruse the park bookstore and shop. Public restrooms available. Located halfway around the Cades Cove Loop Road. Clingmans Dome Visitor Contact Station Enjoy sweeping views of the Smokies, weather permitting, and get your park questions answered. Peruse a small bookstore and shop. Public restrooms are available. Located at the end of Clingmans Dome Road, seven miles from Newfound Gap Road. Oconaluftee Visitor Center Near Cherokee, North Carolina, the Oconaluftee Visitor Center is an ideal starting point as you enter the park's South District. Explore cultural history exhibits. Enjoy ranger-led programs conducted seasonally. Peruse the park bookstore and shop. Find public restrooms and drink vending machines. The adjacent Mountain Farm Museum contains a collection of log structures including a farmhouse, barn, smokehouse, applehouse, corn crib and others. Located on Newfound Gap Road (US-441) two miles north of Cherokee, NC Sugarlands Visitor Center Near Gatlinburg, TN, Sugarlands Visitor Center is an excellent starting point as you enter the park's North District. Learn about the park's plants and animals with natural history exhibits. Enjoy ranger-led programs conducted seasonally. Peruse the park bookstore and shop. Access public restrooms and drink vending machines. The Backcountry Permit Office is here, too. Located on Newfound Gap Road (US-441) two miles south of Gatlinburg, TN. Abrams Creek Campground Abrams Creek Campground—open April 26–October 27, 2024—is located beside beautiful Abrams Creek in a remote and secluded setting. With an elevation of 1,125 feet (343 m), the climate is moderate, characterized by mild winters and hot, humid summers. Flush toilets and drinking water are available. No hookups or showers are available at the campground. Camping Fee 30.00 Camping Fee is per site, per night. Waterside Sites_Abrams Creek Campground Three campsites in a forested area near a creek, one with a large blue and white tent. Abrams Creek Campground offers many waterside sites. Waterside Tent Pad_Abrams Creek Campground A square tent pad at a waterside site with a picnic table and grill, near an orange and white tent. Each site offers a gravel tent pad, a grill, and a picnic table. Nearby sites are typically visible. Shaded Site_Abrams Creek Campground A forested campsite with a tent pad, picnic table, and grill. A nearby tent pad is visible. Most sites offer ample shade. Accessible Restrooms_Abrams Creek Campground A campground restroom with a paved pathway to it. A sign beside a door says, "Wash dishes here". Abrams Creek Campground provides accessible restrooms and a dishwashing area. Trash Receptacles_Abrams Creek Campground Multiple bear-proof trash cans along a gravel road near campsites under a canopy of trees. Promptly dispose of trash in bear-proof trash receptacles throughout the campground. Water View_Abrams Creek Campground Softly rippling water reflecting surrounding trees. A creek view from a bank in the campground. Find beautiful views of the water at Abrams Creek Campground. Accessible Restroom Path_Abrams Creek Campground A blue handicapped sign beside a paved path and campsite near the gravel roadway. A paved pathway near sites 12 and 13 provides access to the Abrams Creek Campground restrooms. Trailhead_Abrams Creek Campground Brown sign that says, "Cooper Road Trail, Little Bottom Trail 0.9, Cane Gap 3.1, Abrams Falls 5.1". The Cooper Road Trail starts near the back of Abrams Creek Campground. Site in Summer_Abrams Creek Campground A tent pad, grill, and picnic table at a waterside site under a green canopy of trees. Enjoy lush forest views in July. Multiple Sites_Abrams Creek Campground Multiple sites along a gravel road under a canopy of green trees. Colorful tents are visible. The 16 sites at Abrams Creek Campground are typically available from late-April to late-October. Balsam Mountain Campground Balsam Mountain Campground—open May 10–October 14, 2024—is surrounded by mountain ranges and streams. With an elevation of 5,310 feet (1,618 m), summer daytime temperatures rarely exceed 70°F (~21°C) and lows may dip to 50°F (10°C). RV and tent sites plus flush toilets and drinking water are available. No hookups or showers are available at the campground and the restrooms do not have lights. Camping Fee 30.00 Camping Fee is per site, per night. Several Sites at Balsam Mountain Campground A fire ring, picnic table, and gravel tent pad in the foreground surrounded by trees and grass. Each site includes a gravel tent pad, fire ring, and picnic table. Trash receptacles are available throughout the campground. Accessible Site at Balsam Mountain Campground A wheelchair accessible campsite with a picnic table, fire ring, and tent pad near grass and trees. Balsam Mountain Campground includes accessible camping opportunities. Balsam Mountain Campground View A paved road lined by grass, shrubs, and trees. A car, trash can, and restroom are in the distance. The road is fully paved at Balsam Mountain Campground. Balsam Mountain Campground Dish Washing Station A brick structure with a brown roof and small windows surrounded by trees. Two sinks visible inside. A dishwashing area is available near the center of the campground. Site at Balsam Mountain Campground A picnic table, fire ring, and tent pad beside a paved road with RVs visible in the background. Most parking areas for Balsam Mountain Campground are parallel to the sites, rather than individual driveways. Site with Stairs at Balsam Mountain Campground Stairs lead up a slight slope to a picnic table, tent pad, and fire ring surrounded by trees. Some sites include stairs from the parking area. Restrooms at Balsam Mountain Campground A paved sidewalk leads to a brick restroom building with a brown roof and trees in background. Restrooms with flush toilets and running water are available. Balsam Mountain Campground Site A picnic table, fire ring, and tent pad with grass in the foreground and trees in the background. Some sites are along the edge of the forest, offering additional privacy. Walk To Sites at Balsam Mountain Campground Two bear boxes, a tent, picnic tables, and multiple tent pads surrounded by trees and grass. Some sites at Balsam Mountain Campground require a short walk from the parking area. Tent Sites at Balsam Mountain Campground A fire ring, picnic table, and tent pad beside pavement. Additional site and trash can in background Some campsites are specifically designated for tents only. Big Creek Campground Big Creek Campground—open March 29–October 27, 2024—is located beside the beautiful Big Creek in a remote and secluded setting. With an elevation of 1,700 feet (518 m), the climate is moderate, characterized by mild winters and hot, humid summers. Tent only camping, flush toilets, and drinking water are available. No hookups or showers are available at the campground. Camping Fee 30.00 Camping Fee is per site, per night. Big Creek Campground A wooded campsite with gravel tent pad Big Creek Campground is located in a remote portion of Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Cades Cove Campground Cades Cove Campground—open year-round—combines the feel of primitive camping with the modern convenience of flush toilets and drinking water. With an elevation of 1,807 feet (551 m), the climate is moderate, characterized by mild winters and hot, humid summers. No hookups or showers are available at the campground. Camping Fee 30.00 Camping fee is per site, per night. Cades Cove Campground Wooded campsite with fall color surrounding a yellow tent. Over 2 million visitors annually come to enjoy the scenic beauty of Cades Cove and its many historic structures. Cades Cove Group Campground Cades Cove combines the feel of primitive camping with the modern convenience of flush toilets and drinking water. A camp store provides visitors with basic necessities and bike rentals. Events like interpretive programs in the nearby amphitheater and bicycle-only days on the Cades Cove Loop Road provide visitors with a fun and unique experience. Group Site #1-2 35.00 20 person maximum Group Site #3 65.00 30 person maximum Group Site#4 53.00 30 person maximum Cades Cove CADES COVE GROUP CADES COVE GROUP Cades Cove Night Sky Deer Bear Cub Wild Turkey Cataloochee Campground Cataloochee Campground—open March 29–October 27, 2024—is located in the historic Cataloochee Valley surrounded by mountain ranges and pristine streams. With an elevation of 2,610 feet (796 m), it is characterized by mild winters and hot, humid summers. It offers traditional camping with the convenience of flush toilets and drinking water. No hookups or showers are available in the campground. Camping Fee 30.00 Camping Fee is per site, per night. Reservations are required. Gravel Road_Cataloochee Campground Several campsites off of a gravel road through a campground. Tents, cars, and trailers visible. Cataloochee Campground's road is gravel and each site has a gravel driveway. Campsite_Cataloochee Campground An empty campsite with a fire ring, picnic table, tent pad, and metal pole in view of trash cans. Each site includes a gravel tent pad, fire ring, and picnic table. Trash receptacles are available throughout the campground. Stream View_Cataloochee Campground A rocky stream with greenery along its banks. Bright sky peaks through the tree canopy. A streamside view near Cataloochee Campground. RV and Trailer_Cataloochee Campground A white RV near a black SUV, a white popup camper, and trash cans in a campground with trees. In addition to tents, RVs and trailers are permitted at Cataloochee Campground. Campsite_Cataloochee Campground A picnic table, fire ring, gravel tent pad, and metal pole near a gravel parking area. Trees nearby. Campsites at Cataloochee Campground offer ample shade in the summer months. Parking and Site_Cataloochee Campground A picnic table, fire ring, tent pad, and metal pole near a gravel parking area and many trees. Each site includes a level tent pad near a parking spot. Cataloochee Campground offers a more secluded experience compared to some other Smokies campgrounds. Road_Cataloochee Campground A gravel roadway framed by trees. Two tents, a vehicle, and trash receptacles are in the distance. The gravel campground road is level and passable by most vehicles in good weather. Multiple Sites_Cataloochee Campground Two campsites near each other, each within view of restroom structure. Each site is within walking distance of a restroom facility. Most sites are visible to nearby sites. Cosby Campground Cosby Campground—open March 29–October 27, 2024—is tucked in the mountains under a canopy of shade. With an elevation of 2,459 feet (750 m), Cosby provides a moderate climate, characterized by mild winters and hot, humid summers. Campsites for both tents and RVs, flush toilets, and drinking water are available. No hookups or showers are available at the campground. Campsite Fee 30.00 Per site per night. Up to 6 people per site. Cosby Campground Ranger Station Sunlit trees behind the campground office with the flag raised Cosby Campground Ranger Station Cosby Campground Restroom Paved walkway leads to a wooden restroom structure Cosby Campground Restroom Cosby Campground Tent Only Site Steps lead to a tent only site occupied by a yellow tent Cosby Campground Tent-only Site Deep Creek Campground Deep Creek Campground—open March 29–October 27, 2024—is located next to one of the park's most popular creeks. With an elevation of 1,800 feet (549 m), the climate is characterized by mild winters and hot, humid summers. Whether blanketed in bright spring wildflowers or vivid fall colors, the scenery at Deep Creek never disappoints. Hookups and showers are not provided, but flush toilets and drinking water are available. Camping Fee 30.00 Camping fee is per site, per night. Deep Creek Campground A campsite near flowing water and trees. A blue tent with orange trim sits on the gravel pad. Deep Creek Campground offers a variety of sites, some streamside. Deep Creek Campground Fire Ring Beside a flowing creek, wood sits inside and next to a metal fire ring with a mobile grate afixed. Deep Creek Campground offers a variety of sites, some streamside. Bridge View at Deep Creek A flowing river from the vantage point of a bridge. The body of water is lined with green trees. Visitors can find many enjoyable water views near the Deep Creek Campground. Elkmont Campground Elkmont Campground—open March 8–November 24, 2024—is the closest family campground to Sugarlands Visitor Center in the North District of the park. With an elevation of 2,150 feet (655 m), the climate is characterized by mild winters and hot, humid summers. Campsites for both tents and RVs, flush toilets, and drinking water are available. No hookups or showers are available at the campground. Campsite 30.00 Camping Fee is per site, per night. Elkmont Campground Sun shining through the forest over an occupied campsite. Generations of campers have returned to Elkmont year after year, drawn by the sounds of the river, the tranquility of the forest, and the variety of recreational activities in the Elkmont area. Forested Elkmont Campground A paved site driveway, fire ring, picnic table, and tent pad surrounded by trees. Each site includes a level tent pad, picnic table, fire ring, and parking area. Multiple Sites at Elkmont Campground A tent pad, picnic table, and fire ring near rocks, trees, and other sites in the distance. Some sites are visible from others, with trees offering partial privacy. RVs at Elkmont Campground A gray and white RV attached to a blue truck. Other sites and trees are in the background. Elkmont Campground provides sites for both tents and RVs. Restrooms at Elkmont Campground A paved sidewalk leading to a restroom building with a brown roof. Trees and grass surround it. Restrooms with flush toilets and running water are available. Accessible Site at Elkmont Campground A wide, paved driveway to an accessible site with a fire ring, picnic table, and tent pad. Elkmont Campground provides wheelchair accessible camping opportunities. Creekside Sites at Elkmont Campground Two campsites separated by trees with a creek in the foreground. Elkmont Campground offers some waterside sites. Elkmont Campground A paved driveway, fire ring, picnic table, and tent pad surrounded by trees and near other sites. Elkmont Campground offers ample shade in the summer months. Site at Elkmont Campground A paved driveway, fire ring, picnic table, and tent pad along the forest's edge. Some sites are along the edge of the forest, offering additional privacy. Driveway at Elkmont Campground A paved driveway near a shaded picnic table, fire ring, and tent pad. Visitors can enjoy a variety of tree species, both deciduous and evergreen, at Elkmont Campground. Elkmont Group Campground These sites offers an ideal setting for group camping excursions and outdoor enthusiasts of all kinds. Camping Fee, Tent Only Area 53.00 Site #1, 30 people maximum, no RVs or trailers allowed. Camping Fee, Tent Only Area 35.00 Site #2, 20 person maximum Camping Fee, Tent Only Area 26.00 Site #3, 15 person maximum Camping Fee, Tent Only Area 35.00 Site #4, 20 person maximum ELKMONT GROUP CAMP ELKMONT GROUP CAMP ELKMONT GROUP CAMP ELKMONT GROUP CAMP ELKMONT GROUP CAMP ELKMONT GROUP CAMP Look Rock Campground Look Rock Campground—open April 26–October 27, 2024—is located along the beautiful Foothills Parkway West between Walland, Tennessee and Chilhowee Lake. With an elevation of 2,600 feet (792 m), the climate is characterized by mild winters and hot, humid summers. Flush toilets and drinking water are available. Ten of the sites offer electric and water hookups. No shower facilities are located in the campground. Standard Non-Electric Camping Fee 30.00 Camping fee is per site, per night. Standard Electric Camping Fee 36.00 Camping fee is per site, per night. Fall_Look Rock Campground A campsite in early fall surrounded by green, yellow, red, and orange trees. Each site is equipped with a gravel tent pad, picnic table, and fire ring. Tent_Look Rock Campground A white tent with a light green rainfly near a picnic table, fire ring, and two paved parking spots. Each site includes a picnic table, fire ring, and paved parking. Pop-Up Camper_Look Rock Campground A white pop-up camper shaded by trees, parked in a paved spot beside a wooden post. Look Rock Campground permits RVs and trailers, in addition to tents. Maximum size depends on the site and is listed on recreation.gov. Fall View_Look Rock Campground Paved road through a forested campground in early fall. Campsites and their parking spots in view. Look Rock Campground in early fall. Pull-Through Sites_Look Rock Campground Multiple pull-through driveways near site picnic tables, tent pads, and fire rings. Roads are paved. Pull-through, one-way driveways are available at some sites at Look Rock Campground. Accessible Parking_Look Rock Campground Paved handicap accessible parking beside a restroom facility surrounded by trees. Accessible parking is available near restroom facilities at Look Rock Campground. Look Rock Overlook Rolling mountains in early fall under clouds, seen from a viewing platform with a rail. Campers can find exceptional mountain views near the campground. Site with Hookup_Look Rock Campground A campsite in the forest with a gravel pad, fire ring, and hookups in view beside the parking spot. Ten sites at Look Rock Campground include electric and water hookups for RV campers. Look Rock Tower Early fall views of rolling mountains. A road cuts through the mountains touched with fall color. A short trail brings visitors to the top of the Look Rock Observation Tower. Site_Look Rock Campground A set of stone stairs leads down to a picnic table, fire ring, and gravel tent pad. Some Look Rock Campground sites are down a set of stone stairs or a slope from the parking space. Sloped Site_Look Rock Campground A picnic table and fire ring upslope from a tent pad at a forested campsite. Some sites are sloped at Look Rock Campground. Dumpster_Look Rock Campground A brown dumpster beside a paved road surrounded by green trees. Bear-proof dumpsters are located throughout Look Rock Campground. Smokemont Campground Smokemont Campground—open year-round—is the closest family campground to Oconaluftee Visitor Center in the South District of the park. With an elevation of 2,198 feet (670 m), the climate is characterized by mild winters and hot, humid summers. Campsites for both tents and RVs, flush toilets, and drinking water are available. No hookups or showers are available at the campground. Camping Fee 30.00 Camping fee is per site, per night. Tent at Smokemont Campground A yellow, orange, and white-colored tent on a level gravel pad near a picnic table and bikes. Each site is equipped with a gravel tent pad, picnic table, and fire ring. Trailer at Smokemont Campground A person standing on a level gravel area setting up a canopy tent, all next to a white trailer. Each campsite includes a level gravel area to set up needed gear. Trailer at Smokemont Campground A white trailer and gray SUV parked at a campsite with a red checkered cloth on its picnic table. Smokemont Campground offers many sites in the shade of the park's various tree species. Tiny Home Trailer at Smokemont Campground A trailer that resembles a tiny home with a red roof and porch cover parked in a campsite. Campsite areas offer space to set up personal chairs and tables. Trailer at Smokemont Campground A gray pickup truck and pop up trailer in the driveway of a campsite surrounded by trees. Smokemont Campground includes some sites that can accomodate trailers. Summer in Smokemont Campground Trees in summer surrounding several campsites, one with a white trailer and gold pickup truck. The trees around many sites in Smokemont Campground offer ample shade. RV in Smokemont Campground A white camper trailer with multiple bikes parked on the side, all under the shade of trees. Many campers enjoy biking around campgrounds during their stay. Side-by-side sites at Smokemont Campground A tent and pop up trailer in sites beside each other under green trees near a dumpster and bathroom. Smokemont Campground offers shady sites for tents, trailers, and RVs. Smokemont Group Campground Mountain ranges and pristine streams and rivers are the backdrop for your camping adventure in Smokemont. Whether blanketed in spring wildflowers or vivid fall colors, the scenery at Smokemont never disappoints. At 2,198 feet (~670 m), Smokemont provides a moderate climate, characterized by mild winters and hot, humid summers. Smokemont Campground offers an unforgettable outdoor experience with campsites for both tents and RVs. The "Wildflower National Park" A hillside in the forest covered with white trillium flowers Wildflowers, such as these white trillium, can be found blooming from February through November in the park. "Smoke" Rising From the Mountains Wisps of fog hang over the forests in the mountains. The park gets its name from mists that often rise like smoke from the mountains. Frosty Morning in Cades Cove A thick layer of frost covers the fields, trees, and mountains in Cades Cove. Wintertime brings a quiet beauty to the Great Smoky Mountains. Fall Colors Near Newfound Gap Bright gold and red leaves shine through the fog in a forest. Fall leaf season is one of the busiest times of year in the park. Fall Meets Winter Gold and red fall colors fill the valleys while snow coats the mountain tops. In spring and fall, weather in the foothills can be pleasant, while snow and cold rule on the mountain tops. A Foggy Morning at Cades Cove Methodist Church Tombstones stand in front of a white, wooden church on a foggy morning. Historic buildings such as churches, gristmills, barns, and homes allow visitors to get a feel for life in the mountains before the national park was created. The Waters of Roaring Fork Below Grotto Falls Rhododendron bushes line the banks of a stream filled with large boulders. Abundant rainfall means lush forests and beautiful stream scenes in the Great Smoky Mountains. Listening to the Eclipse: National Park Service scientists join Smithsonian, NASA in nationwide project A solar eclipse is visually stunning, but what will it sound like? NPS scientists will find out by recording sounds in parks across the USA. An NPS scientist installs audio recording equipment in a lush valley at Valles Caldera NP. 2015 Recipients: George and Helen Hartzog Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Service Six people and programs received the 2015 Harzog Award for their exceptional volunteer service. Check out their amazing contributions! Young volunteer giving a thumbs up sign 2014 Recipients: George and Helen Hartzog Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Service Discover the inspirational stories and amazing dedication of volunteers honored with the 2014 Hartzog Award. Volunteer Thelma Johnson standing with her cooking equipment 2012 Recipients: George and Helen Hartzog Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Service Every year, the National Park Service benefits from the extraordinary contributions of dedicated volunteers. Meet the six recipients of the 2012 Hartzog Awards honoring that service. Two volunteers assisting a visitor NPS Structural Fire Program Highlights 2014 Intern Accomplishments Study Finds Cleaner Air in the Smokies New research finds that ground-level ozone pollution in Great Smoky Mountains National Park (NP) has dropped to its lowest levels since the mid-1980s. Newfound Gap, Great Smoky Mountains National Park Natural Partnership Forged in Fire: National Park Service and The Nature Conservancy Early in 2015, Great Smoky Mountains fire staff met with local TNC representatives to explore avenues for sharing resources on prescribed fire activities and getting more fire on the ground in the Smokies and the Southern Appalachians. Cultural Landscapes by Bicycle There are many ways to experience national parks by bicycle, with route options for all levels of experience and preference. Here are just three examples of ways to explore park cultural landscapes by bike in the southeastern part of the United States. Ride a loop road through an agricultural community in a fertile valley, follow the path of a former railroad that once brought tourists to Mammoth Cave, or travel mountain bike trails to a farmstead from the late 1800s. Two people with bikes gaze over a valley filled with fog, with blue mountains in the background. Testing Hypotheses for Plant Species Distributions in the Mountains Great Smoky Mountains National Park is a site with scientific value. One such scientific landmark is the work of Robert Whittaker, whose PhD dissertation research in the 1940s illuminated the complexity of ecological succession. His work has had a lasting effect on the field of ecology ever since. Orange, yellow and green foliage on a mountainside Park Air Profiles - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Air quality profile for Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Gives park-specific information about air quality and air pollution impacts for Great Smoky Mountains NP as well as the studies and monitoring conducted for Great Smoky Mountains NP. Fall foliage in Great Smoky Mountains National Park Canadian Top Prescribed Burn 2013 In May 2013, wildland firefighters in Great Smoky Mountains NP began a prescribed burn in the Jesse Ridge subunit as part of the Canadian Top Prescribed Fire Plan for the pines and mixed hardwoods found on ridges surrounding the Cataloochee Valley area in the eastern portion on the North Carolina side of Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The plan includes reducing hazardous fuel accumulations and restoring and maintaining a diverse and functioning ecosystem. Ozone effects on two ecosystem services at Great Smoky Mountains National Park, USA Protected areas such as national parks are recognized as important providers of ecosystem services, the benefits nature conveys to humans. However, some threats to these services, such as air pollution, can derive from outside a park’s boundaries. Stream and forest in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. NPS/Tamara Blett World War II Plane Crashes in National Parks During WWII, more than 7,100 air crashes involved US Army Air Force (USAAF) aircraft occurred on American soil. Collectively these crashes resulted in the loss of more than 15,599 lives (Mireles 2006). Many of these military aircraft accidents occurred in remote, often mountainous, areas managed by the National Park Service. plane crash at base of grassy hill Louis E. Voorheis The Voorheis Estate, a landscape within the North District of Great Smoky Mountains National Park, encompass the former mountain retreat developed by Louis E. Voorheis from 1928-1944. It is an example of Rustic style architecture and landscape architecture, evident in the form of structures and designed water features. A stone wall with a rounded top and a square stone basin, surrounded by woodland Reef Bay Trail Rehabilitation Virgin Islands National Park wants to thank Great Smoky Mountain Trail Crew for their tremendous work in rehabilitate the Reef Bay Trail. In addition to clearing the trail much of it had to be reconstructed or redirected. Smoky Mountain Trail Crew Bat Projects in Parks: Great Smoky Mountains National Park There are more than one way to keep up with bats in a park. Find out all the Great Smoky Mountains National Park did! A bat with white fuzz on its muzzle Wildlife Connectivity Near Great Smoky Mountains National Park Jeff Hunter provides an overview of a collaborative wildlife connectivity project focused on 28-miles of highway corridor along I-40 near Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The project seeks to improve the ability of black bear, white-tailed deer, elk (reintroduced in 2001), & other wildlife to safely cross this busy interstate highway and access Cherokee National Forest and other conservation lands northeast of the park. (March 2019) two black bears Creating BearWise Community Partnerships Creating BearWise Community Partnerships looks at the working relationship between Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GRSM) and the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA), and how it has fostered community partnerships that encourage communities surrounding GRSM to become BearWise. (June 2020) evening city view with mountains in the background Women in Fire Science: Cynthia Worthington Cynthia Worthington is a fire effects monitor and has worked in several different units of the National Park Service during her career. The importance of collaboration with other fields and the built-in adaptability of fire programs is one of her favorite parts of working in fire that keeps her coming back. A woman in black rain gear stands with a clipboard in a meadow. Outside Science (inside parks): Smoky Salamanders Student interns get their hands dirty while looking for tiny salamanders at Great Smoky Mountains National Park. captured salamander in a baggie National Parks’ Homefront Battle: Protecting Parks During WWII Though the National Park Service (NPS) was only 25 years old at the outbreak of World War II, the agency found itself fighting a battle on the homefront. With little precedent to work from and dwindling budgets and staff, the NPS strongly defended its parks against a flood of demands to log, mine, graze, drain, and take over national parks Pollinators - Monarch butterfly More than beautiful, monarch butterflies contribute to the health of our planet. While feeding on nectar, they pollinate many types of wildflowers, yet one of the greatest threats to Monarch populations is loss of habitat. A Monarch clings to an orange flower Using Citizen Scientists to Document Life Cycle Changes Citizen scientists of all ages help uncover how the timing of natural events, such as flowering or migration, is changing from year to year in the Great Smoky Mountains. Two girls identifying a tree Partnerships Make Wetland Restoration Happen Tribes, volunteers, and students came together to restore a critically important wetland in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Teamwork made the project successful. group of people plant native plants in a grassy meadow Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Series: Parks in Science History Parks in Science History is a series of articles and videos made in cooperation with graduate students from various universities. They highlight the roles that national parks have played in the history of science and, therefore, the world's intellectual heritage. A woman looking through binoculars Series: Park Air Profiles Clean air matters for national parks around the country. Photo of clouds above the Grand Canyon, AZ Burned Area Recovery from the Chimney Tops 2 Fire, Great Smoky Mountains National Park After the 2016 Chimney Tops 2 Fire in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, staff has undertaken several projects to stabilize and restore the landscape, including a project for the cultivation and preservation of eastern hemlock. Two Americorps team members hold insecticide next to a tree. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Great Smoky Mountains National Park, North Carolina and Tennessee Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] valley with stream Cambrian Period—541 to 485.4 MYA The flat layers of rock exposed in Grand Canyon National Park encompass much of the Paleozoic, beginning in the Cambrian where they record an ancient shoreline. rock with fossil burrow tracks Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Dare to Imagine: Alix Pfennigwerth Scroll through this bright data visualization to learn how Biologist Alix Pfennigwerth studies and protects biodiversity hotspots in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. This data story is part of a National Park Foundation funded project called the Dare to Imagine project dedicated to highlighting women in parks who are breaking barriers and showing what a scientist looks like. Meet Alix Pfennigwerth, a Biological Science Technician at Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Great Smoky Mountains National Park and Appalachian-Piedmont-Coastal Zone Fire Management Staff Complete Wears Valley Boundary Prescribed Fire Great Smoky Mountains National Park and the Appalachian-Piedmont-Coastal Zone fire management staff successfully completed a 175-acre prescribed burn along a half-mile of the park boundary in Wears Valley in March 2021. The prescribed burn was conducted to reduce the amount of flammable brush along the park's boundary with residential homes, as well as maintain an open woodland habitat for drought-tolerant trees, like oak and pine.   Staff monitors prescribed fire at Great Smoky National Park. Changing Patterns of Water Availability May Change Vegetation Composition in US National Parks Across the US, changes in water availability are altering which plants grow where. These changes are evident at a broad scale. But not all areas experience the same climate in the same way, even within the boundaries of a single national park. A new dataset gives park managers a valuable tool for understanding why vegetation has changed and how it might change in the future under different climate-change scenarios. Green, orange, and dead grey junipers in red soil, mountains in background Girl (Guide) Power Just as the contributions of many women have been overlooked in NPS history, so too have the contributions of girls who held officially sanctioned guide positions. Two girl ranger aides speak with a man across a counter. The bioblitz: Good science, good outreach, good fun Part contest, part festival, part educational event, and part scientific endeavor, bioblitzes bring together naturalists, professional scientists, and the interested public, who canvass the area over a 24-hour period to find and document all plants and animals. young woman gathers flying insects from a backlit white sheet at night. 2021 National Park Service Aviation Awards In 2021, the National Park Service Aviation Program awarded the Excellence in Mentorship Aviation Award, the Tom Clausing Aviation All Risk (Hazard) Program Award, Aviator of the Year Award, and the Wright Brothers Aviation Safety Award. Five men and a woman stand surrounding a Mesa Verde Helitack sign. Two men hold awards. Taking the Pulse of U.S. National Parks How do we know if parks are healthy? We measure their vital signs, of course! Across the country, there are 32 inventory and monitoring networks that measure the status and trends of all kinds of park resources. We're learning a lot after years of collecting data. Check out these articles written for kids and reviewed by kids in partnership with the international online journal Frontiers for Young Minds. A cartoon of a ranger taking the pulse of the Earth. Series: Geologic Time—Major Divisions and NPS Fossils The National Park System contains a magnificent record of geologic time because rocks from each period of the geologic time scale are preserved in park landscapes. The geologic time scale is divided into four large periods of time—the Cenozoic Era, Mesozoic Era, Paleozoic Era, and The Precambrian. photo of desert landscape with a petrified wood log on the surface Fuels treatments fulfill needs of wildlife and visitors at Great Smoky Mountains National Park Over the past three years, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Cherokee National Forest, and the Appalachian-Piedmont-Coastal Fire Management Zone (APC Zone) have worked together to do fuels treatments. This project is one of a suite of management actions used at Great Smoky Mountains to preserve the cultural landscape and ecological character of this unique area in the park. The corner of a cabin looking toward a cleared area with deciduous forest beyond. Guide to the Thomas J. Allen Photograph Collection Finding aid for the Thomas J. Allen Photographs in the NPS History Collection. 50 Nifty Finds #5: Keeping Their Cool The park ranger uniform is known the world over. Perhaps the most iconic part of the uniform is the broad-brimmed flat hat. Over the last century, however, many different kinds of hats have been worn by rangers depending on their gender, where they work, the season of the year, and the jobs they do. While a pith helmet may bring up images of Colonial Britain, World War II soldiers, explorers, or people on safaris, for a while it was also be worn by some park rangers. Tan pith helmet with a silver Sequoia cone on the front Natural High Points of States in Parks We all strive to reach new heights whether taking on the physical challenge to climb to the top or armchair-exploring from the comfort of our own home through virtual experiences. Discover the highest natural points in each state that are located within the National Park System, many of which can be visited by hikers, climbers, mountaineers, and drivers who are often rewarded by breathtaking views. Find photos, virtual tours, fun facts, and more on park websites. Snow-covered mountain elevation 50 Nifty Finds #9: Green Stamps Described by some as "the greatest propaganda campaign ever launched by the federal government to exploit the scenic wonders of the United States," the national park stamps issued by the U.S. Post Office Department in 1934 became one of the most recognized series of U.S. stamps. Despite being in the middle of the Great Depression, over one billion of the 10 national park stamps were printed in under two years. College of ten colorful national park stamps Investigation and Stabilization of Apple Trees at Purchase Knob At Purchase Knob, more than 30 apple trees have persisted for well over a hundred years, despite decades without human care. When they were planted in the late 1800s by John Fergsuon, he found that the high elevation and cool nights were favorable to both production and storage. Now, the NPS is taking steps to stabilize these trees by clearing encroaching vegetation, removing dead or damaged limbs, and using DNA analysis to identify specific varieties. NPS staff stands with a sign beside the trunk of a tall apple tree with upright, leafless branches Girl Scouts Use Girl Scout Cookie Boxes to Create National Park Designs Have you ever considered how Girl Scout cookie boxes could be used for something other than the cookies themselves? In March of this year, six teams from the Girl Scouts of Northeast Texas in grades 6-12 partnered with local architects and engineers in Dallas Texas to compete in a design contest that transformed Girl Scout cookie boxes into National Park-themed structures. A view of a national park made from Girl Scout cookie boxes 2022 Excellence in Education Awards View regional recipients of the National Park Service Excellence in Education Awards, which recognize expertise within the field of education. Young students participate in an activity with a park ranger at a table outdoors. 2022 George and Helen Hartzog Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Service The National Park Service is pleased to congratulate the recipients of the 2022 George and Helen Hartzog Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Service. A montage of photos of volunteers working in a national park. Project Profile: Detect and Control Invasive Feral Swine The National Park Service will reduce invasive wild hog populations at Great Smoky Mountains National Park to protect cultural and natural resources. a group of feral swine 50 Nifty Finds #33: "First Lady" of National Parks Although the spouses of directors don't have formal roles in the NPS, they can be crucial to the success of a directorship. This was certainly true of the powerful partnership of Director George B. Hartzog, Jr. and his wife. Throughout his career, Helen C. Hartzog was his cheerleader, confident, and partner in developing a vision for the NPS that has had long-lasting effects. More than anyone, she served as a “first lady” of the NPS. Woman smiling at the camera wearing a fur wrap and corsage. Mission 66 and Modern Architecture A brief overview of the Park Service Modern architectural style established during Mission 66. A modern building with tall, angular window walls and an attached cyclorama Intern Spotlight: Avery Guy Meet Avery Guy, a former Fish and Feathers intern through Environment for the Americas. She shares her experience of her internship and the impact it had on her. A woman sitting on a bench with water, trees, and mountains behind her 50 Nifty Finds #39: An NPS Art Factory Between 1938 and 1941 the National Park Service (NPS) Western Museum Laboratories (WML) created many iconic posters. Often described as “the WPA park posters,” they should be called “the WML posters.” Research reveals more designs than previously thought (including several previously unknown ones), reevaluates what is known about the artists, and argues that modern reproductions have made the designs more significant to NPS graphic identity today than they were in the past. Poster with a purple El Capitan at Yosemite How to Assess Air Pollution's Impacts on Forests The interconnectedness of living things is evident in a forest, where lichens act as pollution alarm clocks, and soil fungi help trees survive. Scientists studied just four types of organisms in the national park forest ecosystem to gauge its health. Colorful lichens on a tree trunk. The Devoted People behind Big Data in National Parks Citizen science volunteers collect massive amounts of crucial scientific information. They gather it from sources as varied as oceans, mountainsides, and historic archives. Smart new tools are making their contributions even more powerful. Two smiling women stand in front of a national park sign.
5 Tr er ay er m am Tr tC oun M we Lo 1 2. M o 0.6 il e Cr Bi g to g Bo t Walnu t il l Ga p Trail 2.5 1.0 ee T 4.1 rail oc h a lo 9 3. t il 0.8 h Li t Ri 2. 3 Br Tr k 40 E Exit 20 Appalachian Highlands Science Learning Center Purchase Gap 0 276 1.8 Bal d CH EE Jonath O C ATA L O an 5.5 ph E C r ee k il l Hem Black Camp Gap To Asheville Dellwood Maggie Valley To Asheville Soco Gap Tr ai l 2. 4 Q UAL L A B O UNDAR Y (Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians land) F Creek WAYNESVILLE Waterrock Knob Great Smoky Mountains National Park occupies the traditional lands of the Cherokee (ᏣᎳᎩ, Tsalagi) people, now the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, the Cherokee Nation, and the United MS L SA Keetoowah Band of the Cherokee. BA ue Bl Ridge Whittier Pa 74 G rk Swain County Visitor Center P LO TT wa k Tuc a gee R i ve r l pa 23 hi ac ad ley an SYLVA Fork ok em on t Lo 9 op 3. Tr ws 1.0 10 Kilometers 1 10 Miles 1 trin Appalachian Trail Hiking only (top) Horse and hiking Hiking trail Mountains-To-Sea Trail Horse and hiking trail Benton MacKaye Trail g Tr Unpaved road 2.2 Ri ve Developed campground Auto-access horse camp r ta ha la Ranger station Observation tower MO 129 Roads in park are closed to commercial vehicles. TA H ALA UNT AIN S 5 6 7 8 9 10 Shelter (Hiker only) Shelter (Horse and hiker) 00 Hiker only campsite 1.3 Trail distances are shown in miles between intersections 00 Horse and hiker campsite 00 Boat-in only campsite This trail map is not intended to show legal boundary of the national park. To Atlanta 4 H 441 NAN I NS LD To Tennessee ton Bald Tr E MAP LEGEND North 0 Riv er BA 23 0 New G OLD 0.9 Lit tle 28 D 441 Br 0.3 Cheoah Bald D Ro DIV ee 3.9 Tra il 1.9 ee Cr ee D iv ide 4.6 Tr a 0.5 M cK n ma Catalo och 2.9 il B ooger Tr 6 4. ad Ro Fork gh t e C a t a l o oc h e e ra e 1.7 For rk Fo Parkway ve Double Gap r dg 3. Polls Gap oga Rid ge into He Road s o (cl ed in winter) e Ra v e n 4.4 ast Stra i 1.7 l el w .4 1 ld Balsam Mountain i Ra g ve n as m Tr a Tra il 3. 3 0.6 Ba 3.1 Divide MA S Cre e Ch Tr rk Fo Trail E G RI D il Tra ge Rid 2 2. an di 1.1 1.0 2.0 0.7 k T rail Sunk o ta 0.7 3.8 p TH O Trail 3.6 Cr ee k p Dee Cree 4.3 k IDE D IV A NOL Dee Tr 4.1 k C d lan No 1.0 Sna k 0 1. 4. 5 Tr ai l in ta in w int er ) d P 5 re ek ND y ch Y NE FO R 0.4 3.9 Do m 3.5 Clin gm an s il T 4. e l Cr ee k Fo 1.2 h ug 3.5 Co ID in k 7.6 0.4 3.6 T e r Ro u 0.7 1.1 Forney e ac Ka y M 1.8 Huskey 2. 1 1.7 0.9 A lu m C av l ai Tra il Welc h GE RID Cr 1.3 Tr Cr Cree k H 0.9 0.9 C es J ak 5 2. R I D GE JENK INS kins Ridge T RAIL Trail Jen 5.2 S na Creek Cove 1.4 Lu m 4.1 b Trail C e Eag l Ea gl e 8.7 3.1 3.7 ty W es t TN E M BO T Tra il ll F us se 6. 4 il e Tra idg yR or Pro ng 2. 7 Mtn t ie l d 3.5 Road k 1.2 Rd n Rich one-way 0 1. r) Forge C ( clo sed in Bote Mtn d TC HA 2.6 rM tn Tr Turkeypen Ridg La 3.4 Cr ee k M R Ca HE an 7 1. ar re g Tr IN ne O U 4.2 Tr N TA 2.1 Tr ai l Cr ee e k M 9 0. d rk wa y Be 2. Tw 6 en Ro Ca rk Fo Ri dg e 3.2 41 rk T (tem po Fo Cove Creek Gap l y ey Ro a 40 2.6 Parson B er ) Bi 42 Creek NA i Tra ad Pa Palmer House Tr pp yV al l PISGAH NATIONAL FOREST 0.8 Spruce Mountain Flat LI ai l Tr ek Cataloochee g Fk Round Bottom Rd om ot t RO eek Cr e Cr 0.8 lls 3 Spruce Mountain Trail H Ha Pin Oak Gap 1.2 CA il Tra 3.6 3. 40 k 4.0 rail p T ow Ga S C WATERVILLE LAKE un e Ridg tty Holl N d t hi i aye Tra acK Pretty Hollow Gap Palmer dB t o o g a / Ro u n ot T Mount Sterling Gap 39 le Tr ei n E t Sterling T r Long B l I TA Fo 3 M Tra i UN SE 2. Fo rk MO 2.3 lsam Mtn in w ES Cree k Tr ail Mount Sterling 4.0 Laurel Gap 0 in H e xt Ba r 1 Pre AM n Mount ed 441 FOREST 19 3 6. 38 ow LS to Ben c Bee n Na 2 m a ll Sw BA 9 (clo s 19 Ap NATIONAL 74 1 n ap k ek Plott Balsam Ela er NANTAHALA 143 S es t ek Tr Trail 5.1 Oconaluftee River Trail 1.5 S oc o 28 ROBBINSVILLE NO Br Tr CHEROKEE 0.5 Trail Wesser NTA B 2.1 RI Skyway nic MO U ut 19 441 143 D MOUNTAIN Waterville Big Creek 9 1. Ch Cr e 36 M Tr B Oconaluftee Visitor Center 4 2.8 ge p H ya t t NN y 0.9 Ga Ri Trail lu e 1.0 Mt Cammerer Bi 9 E 5 or Tow String Deep Creek er RIDG R iv HES Smokemont Davenport Gap e ek Cr 37 1.0 ail .1 R o ad Cove 2.2 e 4. Ba 1.8 47 50 Tow String Tr k Trail or 2.2 Tuckasege ge Stone Pile Gap Trail l k Tr 3.6 lo e C ree k k Creek Tr 2.9 Indian Creek Motor Trail In 0.9 Rid 60 2. 2.5 RT NORTH CAROLINA 2.3 Low Gap Tr ail 2.5 B o Th 1. 1.8 51 Tra i 9 r 59 e De
B A C Monticello 1 200 92 B3 167 KY 154 Middlesborough, KY/TN/VA 74 W Cumberland Trail B11 52 63 Cumberland Trail 441 329 New Tazewell Obed Wild & Wartburg Scenic River 139 321 321 321 Walland Maryville and Alcoa 72 Tellico Lake 321 95 68 Sweetwater 58 Foothills Parkway Sequoyah Birthplace Museum 68 Madisonville 360 REST Tellico Plains Etowah Tellico River 11 Delano Charleston 315 r ke Co 68 Nancy Ward Reliance Gravesite State Historic Site Benton 30 74 64 Ocoee Ranger Station Parksville C6 Lake 60 Oc oee Ocoee Scenic Byway Red Clay State Historic Park e River Riv er N3 C7 Ranger Ducktown Tusquitee Ranger Station Crandall Conasauga River 60 Blue Ridge Young Harris 76 Benton MacKaye Trail 225 Blue Ridge Lake 286 Nottely Blairsville Lake CHATTAHOOCHEE NATIONAL FOREST Lake Chatuge 76 180 19 2 A N11 N12 441 Clayton SUMTER NATIONAL FOREST 197 17 Lake Burton 76 130 C D Hendersonville Carl Sandburg Home National Historic Site CS Landrum, SC/NC E 74 U.S. Forest Service Shelby 226 Boiling National Park ServiceSprings 9 National Park Service Site* 00 W 5 198 State Park Urban Area 11 Chesnee MAP AREA Gaffney 85 Major Water Body 110 SC 14 292 Major River 9 40 85 85 Scenic Driving Route 29 136 Other National Heritage Areas Greenville Blue Ridge National Heritage 183 Area Name221 ©2021 RecreationLinks.org / Updated January 2021 F 6 9 14 123 NOTE: This publication and the information it contains are provided as a public service. The publisher makes no claims, promises or guarantees about the accuracy, completeness, or adequacy of the contents and expressly disclaims liability for errors and omissions in the contents. No warranty of any kind, implied, expressed or statutory, is given with respect to the contents of this publication. 9 Blue Ridge Parkway 101 296 385 18 176 276 135 29 Major Hiking Route Name 585 25 186 18 State Boundary 176 290 178 Landmark (*See list on other side of page) 74 101 Tennessee Civil War National Heritage 11 Area Rest Area Forest City Public Recreation Sites* 26 0 178 Seneca State Route 74 French Broad River 183 183 00 4 Welcome Center 108 Locator Lake Jocassee Dillard US Route 276 28 106 00 W City/Town 64 280 Gorges State Park 281 Highlands 23 191 11 64 Cashiers Interstate Chimney Rock State Park 176 Brevard Lake Toxaway Yellow Mtn. Tower N4 P3 215 Forest Heritage Scenic Byway 255 B Pisgah Ranger Station 281 Lake Glenville REST South Mountains State Park 00 00 0 R6 1756 107 Brasstown Bald 348 Chatsworth Franklin GA 75 P6 P2 N7 515 5 411 NANTAHALA NATIONAL FOREST 74 18 64 221 25 REST 70 18 Grandfather Ranger Station 226 P4 FOREST ROAD 5000 Morganton 40 215 N1 Tuckasegee 69 McCaysville 225 28 Albert Mountain Tower 64 Brasstown R5 276 Sylva N9 REST PISGAH NATIONAL FOREST REST 74 23 Nantahala Ranger Station Murphy 74 64 Copperhill 6 N5 294 Riv er FOREST ROAD 479 151 Lake James State Park NC 9 191 441 Mountain Waters Byway 141 123 74 Waynesville 107 Nantahala Lake Hiwassee Lake Apalachia Lake FOREST ROAD 77 314 Ocoee 313 Hiwasse The Qualla Boundary Cherokee Blue Ridge Parkway Wayah Bald 74 19 C2 411 64 11 Unaka 19 441 Appalachian Trail Andrews Benton MacKaye Trail Unicoi Gap N8 Wesser Bald 129 Cherohala Skyway k ee Cr C3 Robbinsville T2 Coker Creek Hiwassee-Ocoee Scenic River State Park Cleveland 143 ROAD 210 Canton Blue Ridge Parkway Visitor Center 19 Catawba River 70 Old REST Fort P9 Flattop Mtn. 70 240 64 226 Black Mountain Asheville 276 Maggie Valley S8 19 e 163 C10 FOREST S5 74 N10 28 N2 Santeetlah Lake Cheoah N13 Ranger 143 Station N6 165 CHEROKEE NATIONAL FOREST 306 Fontana Lake Benton MacKaye Trail C4 Tellico Ranger Station 28 Little Tennesse 30 Fontana Village 1227 REST Lenoir 181 Marion P1 Leicester 25 S6 19 R4 Weaverville 63 40 S7 S9 S17 Englewood 411 441 Benton MacKaye Trail Citico Creek 68 209 FOREST ROAD 482 3 126 80 FOREST ROAD 472 REST S4 Clingmans Dome la 307 S3 1238 Blue Ridge Parkway Mt. Mitchell State Park Barnardsville 25 P7 268 321 P8 Wilson Creek 1328 P5 226 26 French Broad River W GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS NATIONAL PARK Little Tennessee River 75 Appalachian Trail S14 Cades Cove Loop 129 30 Athens S16 S15 Fort Loudoun State Historic Park 68 321 S10 r 72 Townsend Look Rock Tower 411 r Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail S12 Riv e 27 73 Na nta ha 11 C12 S1 S11 Marshall PISGAH NATIONAL FOREST R3 19e 197 R1 R2 Grandfather REST Blowing Rock Mountain State Park 183 Spruce Pine Mars Hill 213 Bluff ive S2 Gatlinburg Walnut 421 90 194 Appalachian Ranger Station Deep Gap 221 181 221 Hot Springs Hartford R 194 Burnsville Appalachian Trail 184 261 19 Max Patch
Great Smoky Mountains National Park National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior SMOKIES GUIDE The Official Newspaper of the Smokies • Spring 2024 rr y De ng La er A singing northern parula, one of many warblers whose migration back to the Smokies heralds the coming of spring. Image courtesy of N. Lewis. che s s e r, R ov ing P ar k Ra Words with a Ranger My desire to become a park ranger came as an epiphany several years ago while I was on a guided walk in Yellowstone National Park. The walk was through what is known as the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone, and the ranger who led it made it an incredible experience. Before the group dispersed, the ranger recommended considering a career with the park service and gave each of us a puzzle piece with a small part of the canyon to take home. After that, I was determined to become a ranger so I could make the same difference for others that the Yellowstone ranger had made for me. After I concluded my military career, I joined the park service, and that puzzle piece is still with me today. It has traveled to more than 30 other national parks so far. Continued on page 8 For Birds and Blooms, Timing Is Everything Species tune into key seasonal signals to thrive H umans seem to be the only forms of life in the Smokies that rely on a calendar. For the other 21,000+ species discovered in these mountains so far, knowing when to sing, bloom, or set out in search of food depends on paying close attention to environmental cues. In spring, as days lengthen, temperatures climb, and rains soak the ground, a whole host of plants known as “spring ephemerals” receive their signal to flower. Over millennia, these early risers have adapted to attract pollinators within the brief window of springtime when most deciduous trees have yet to put out their leaves and direct sunlight is still plentiful on the forest floor. Spring ephemerals generally peak in early to mid-April in the Smokies with some persisting into May at the cooler higher elevations. Songbirds also take note of these seasonal signals and the growing avail- OUR PARK ON SOCIAL MEDIA ability of food. Resident birds establish their territories, sing more frequently, and develop colorful plumage in hopes of attracting a mate. Meanwhile, migrant songbirds start to move and arrive daily throughout spring from their wintering grounds elsewhere to join in the chorus of song and set to building their nests. When we humans decide to study these changes, we call it phenology. Every year, park biologists and community volunteers organized by the Great Smoky Mountains Institute at Tremont visit designated phenology plots to measure the progress of the seaons. By carefully collecting data about natural events over time, we can reveal fascinating interconnections and better understand how everything from blooming wildflowers to migrating songbirds will respond to change as they set their busy schedules. GreatSmoky MountainsNPS 86A-B68 PARKING TAG REQUIRED! Parking in the Smokies for more than 15 minutes requires a valid parking tag (annual tag pictured). For more info, scan code with camera app GreatSmokyNPS GreatSmokyNPS S M O K I E S Visitor centers Sugarlands, Oconaluftee, and Cades Cove: open 9 a.m.–5 p.m. March through May (7 a.m.–3:30 p.m. Wednesdays in May at Cades Cove). Clingmans Dome: reopens April 1; open 9:30 a.m.–6 p.m. April and May. GSM Institute at Tremont: open 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Tuesday–Saturday. Cable Mill: reopens April 1. Mingus Mill: closed until further notice for repairs. Road closures Many secondary and higherelevation roads are closed seasonally in winter and reopen in spring. Refer to the map on pages 6-7 for opening dates. • Cades Cove Loop Road is closed to vehicles on Wednesdays from May 1 through September 25 to allow for non-motorized recreation. • All park roads are subject to temporary closure during dangerous driving conditions. Visit nps.gov/grsm and click “Alerts.” Shuttle services Local shuttle services offer convenient transportation to and from the park’s most iconic destinations. Routes, schedules, pricing, and pick-up/drop-off locations vary. Visit go.nps.gov/grsmshuttles for a list of authorized concessioners. T R I P P L A N N E R Firewood Campgrounds in the national park The National Park Service maintains developed campgrounds at ten locations in the park. There are no showers, and hookups are only available at Look Rock Campground (ten campsites include electric and water hookups). There are circuits for special medical uses at Cades Cove, Elkmont, and Smokemont. Campsite reservations are required at all park campgrounds. Sites may be reserved up to six months in advance. Make your reservation online at recreation.gov or call 877.444.6777. Site occupancy is limited to six people and two vehicles (a trailer is considered one vehicle). The maximum stay is 14 days. Campsites for larger groups are available at Big Creek, Cades Cove, Cataloochee, Cosby, De
Great Smoky Mountains National Park National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior SMOKIES GUIDE For current road conditions, call 865.436.1200. For seasonal road closures, see map page 6 or visit nps.gov/grsm. Image courtesy of Great Smoky Mountains Association. at na ra H ge ba me B ar nt The Official Newspaper of the Smokies • Winter 2023-24 ch e r, C h i e f of Fa c i M li t y a Words with a Ranger In my role as chief of facility management, I’m responsible for the maintenance and operations of park buildings and infrastructure including 10 campgrounds, 11 picnic areas, 90 historic structures, 150 cemeteries, 270 miles of road, and 848 miles of trail. Thankfully, I’m only one member of an incredibly capable and devoted team that makes it all possible day in and day out. Some fourteen years ago, I began my park service career right here in the Smokies as a park engineer, but before that I worked as a community planner and transportation engineer in the public and private sectors. After moving on to other managerial positions in different regional and Washington offices, I was grateful for the chance to return to this park last year. The Continued on page 8 Your Guide to Winter Driving Take road closures and conditions into account when planning your trip W inter is typically the quietest season in the Smokies, which makes it a great time to get out and explore the park. With a little planning and a few extra layers, the well-prepared can find frosty fields, snow-dusted mountaintops, and waterfalls dripping with icicles. The first step is knowing which roads will take you there. Several of the park’s secondary and higher-elevation roadways are closed for the winter season to ensure visitor safety. Other roads may be temporarily closed due to unsafe conditions and reopened as soon as possible. Road salts are not used within the park to protect vegetation and water quality. Instead, road crews regularly plow and apply a mixture of sand and gravel called ‘chat’ to improve traction. One major roadway subject to frequent closure is Newfound OUR PARK ON SOCIAL MEDIA Gap Road (US 441), the main route connecting Gatlinburg, Tennessee, and Cherokee, North Carolina. This road stretches 33 miles across the mountains and rises to a height of 5,046 feet. Even though conditions may seem safe down around Gatlinburg or Cherokee, temperatures drop rapidly at higher elevations, and precipitation is much more frequent and heavy. The steep grades and blind corners of this road quickly become dangerous in inclement weather. As you enjoy the park this winter, remember to reduce your speed, avoid sudden braking, and leave extra space between you and the vehicle in front of you. Travel speeds on most of the park’s paved roads average 30 miles per hour. To plan your trip, see the park map on page 6 for seasonal road closures and the map on the back page for alternate routes. GreatSmokyMountainsNPS 86A-B68 PARKING TAG REQUIRED! Parking in the Smokies for more than 15 minutes requires a valid parking tag (annual tag pictured). For more info, scan code with camera app GreatSmokyNPS S M O K I E S Visitor centers Sugarlands, Oconaluftee, and Cades Cove: open 9 a.m.–4:30 p.m. December through February, 9 a.m–5 p.m. in March. Clingmans Dome: closed for winter, reopens 9:30 a.m.–5 p.m. in March. GSM Institute at Tremont: open 10 a.m–4 p.m. Tuesday through Friday only. All visitor centers are closed on December 25. Road closures • Many secondary and higher-­elevation roads close in late fall and remain closed through winter. Refer to the map on pages 6–7 for closing and opening dates. • All roads are subject to temporary closure due to dangerous driving conditions. Shuttle services Local shuttle services offer convenient transportation to and from the park’s most iconic destinations. Routes, schedules, pricing, and pick-up/drop-off locations vary. Visit go.nps.gov/GRSMShuttles for a list of authorized concessioners. Weather As winter arrives, days can be sunny and 65°F or snowy with highs in the 20s. Conditions vary considerably between low and high elevations. Nearly 70 inches of snow fall on Mount Le Conte every year. Lows of -20°F are possible at the higher elevations. At lower elevations, snows of an inch or more can be expected about three to five times a year. Milder temperatures typically arrive by mid-to-late April. T R I P P L A N N E R Firewood Campgrounds in the national park The National Park Service ­maintains developed campgrounds at ten locations in the park. There are no showers, and hookups are only available at Look Rock Campground (ten campsites include electric and water hookups). There are circuits for special medical uses at Cades Cove, Elkmont, and Smokemont. Campsite reservations are required at all park campgrounds. Sites may be reserved up to six months in advance. Make your reservation online at ­recreation.gov or call 877.444.6777. Site occupancy is limited to six peop
Great Smoky Mountains National Park National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior SMOKIES GUIDE s, ra be rt nc Ro hC B rad hief The Official Newspaper of the Smokies • Fall 2023 Bu il d i ng s an d G n r ou ds B Words with a Ranger As branch chief of buildings and grounds, I oversee a talented and dedicated team responsible for maintaining 10 campgrounds, 11 picnic areas, and more than 360 structures here in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. It may not be the first thing you notice as you take in the scenery, but our team works hard year-round to make sure all kinds of critical park facilities stay clean, safe, and structurally sound. I began my 31-year career in the Smokies at the age of 16 as a Job Corps member serving in Oconaluftee and then as a ‘student in training’ before I was eventually hired as a permanent staff member. Between then and now, I’ve worked as a laborer, maintenance worker, work leader, sign maker, building utility supervisor, and maintenance mechanic supervisor. If you’ve ever enjoyed a campground or picnic area in the Smokies, chances are your experience was made possible by a custodial or grounds employee. These staff members perform vital services like cleaning bathrooms, removing trash, Continued on page 8 Vacation homes constructed just prior to the creation of the national park are preserved in the Daisy Town area of Elkmont. Thirteen renovated cabins were recently reopened for visitors to explore. Image by Susan Milinkovich. Windows into the Past Historic structures help tell the Smokies story T he Great Smoky Mountains are home to an amazing diversity of wildlife, more than 100 species of native trees, and some of the largest stands of old-growth forest in the eastern United States. While much of this mountain range may seem like a rugged wilderness, human stories have been embedded within this landscape even longer than the park’s very oldest blackgum tree. “For thousands of years, there has been a human footprint on this land,” said Interpretive Ranger Brad Free. Today, traces of these stories can still be found in everything from the routes of trails first created by Cherokee people to the many historic homes, schools, churches, and mills maintained by the park’s Forever Places preservation crew. “Over a hundred structures have become tangible pieces of evidence OUR PARK ON SOCIAL MEDIA that show us how life was here in the Smokies,” said Free. “It doesn’t give us the whole picture, but it does give us a foundation on which to gain more knowledge of the folks who once lived here.” Historic buildings recently renovated and reopened to the public include more than a dozen cabins in the Daisy Town area of Elkmont as well as the Walker Sisters Cabin near Metcalf Bottoms. Cades Cove, Cataloochee, and Oconaluftee also offer opportunities to explore the Smokies’ rich cultural history. Several structures in these areas date to the 1800s, and nearly all make use of materials sourced nearby. To learn more, talk to a volunteer or ranger, pick up a book in a park bookstore, or visit nps.gov/grsm. You can also visit Elkmont during Daisy Town Day (see page 3) or dive into the Daisy Town scavenger hunt on page 11. GreatSmokyMountainsNPS 86A-B68 PARKING TAG REQUIRED! Parking in the Smokies for more than 15 minutes requires a valid parking tag (annual tag pictured). For more info, scan code with camera app GreatSmokyNPS S M O K I E S Visitor centers Sugarlands, Oconaluftee, and Cades Cove: open 9 a.m.–5 p.m. September through November; 9 a.m.–4:30 p.m. December. Clingmans Dome: open 10 a.m.–6 p.m. September through October; 10 a.m.–5 p.m. November. Closed December. GSM Institute at Tremont: open 10 a.m–4 p.m. Tuesday–Saturday through December 16. Tuesday–Friday only after December 16. Road closures • Cades Cove Loop Road is closed to vehicles on Wednesdays from May 3 through September 27 to allow for walking and biking. • Many secondary and higher-­ elevation roads close in late fall and remain closed through winter. Refer to the map on pages 6-7 for closing dates. • All roads are subject to temporary closure due to dangerous driving conditions. Shuttle services Local shuttle services offer convenient transportation to and from the park’s most iconic destinations. Routes, schedules, pricing, and pick-up/drop-off locations vary. Visit go.nps.gov/GRSMShuttles for a list of authorized concessioners. Park weather In autumn, a pattern of warm, sunny days and crisp, clear nights emerges by mid-September. However, cool, rainy days may also occur. Snow may fall at higher elevations beginning in November. As winter arrives, days can be sunny and 65°F or snowy with highs in the 20s. Snows of an inch or more may occur at lower ­elevations. SMOKIES GUIDE P L A N N E R Firewood Camping in the national park The National Park Service maintains developed campgrounds at ten locations in the park. There are no showers, and hookups are only available at Look Rock
Great Smoky Mountains National Park National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior SMOKIES GUIDE t Ku lp Bi ol at og M is t The Official Newspaper of the Smokies • Summer 2023 ,S upe r v is or y e Fish ry Words with a Ranger As the supervisory fishery biologist for Great Smoky Mountains National Park, I am responsible for protecting, preserving, and managing more than 70 species of fish, setting fishing regulations for 5 species of game fish, and maintaining and improving the water quality of more than 2,900 miles of park streams and rivers. We protect and preserve fish populations by monitoring them annually, restoring native fish in select streams, and working with neighboring state and federal partners to ensure stream populations remain free from nonnative parasites and diseases. We also lead a variety of research studies to inform park managers on current topics such as water chemistry changes associated with acid rain, conservation genetics of our native fish species, and mercury levels in fish tissue. I became interested in this field after attending local fishing club meetings with my father and watching presentations by the state fishery biologist. Continued on page 8 Mouse Creek Falls cascades into the scenic Big Creek. Shuttle services can provide transportation to the Big Creek area and other popular destinations where parking may be limited. Image by Michele Sons. Explore More with a Shuttle This Summer Shuttle services offer a dependable transportation alternative P lanning an adventure in the Smokies this summer but worried about finding a parking spot? Local shuttle services can take the uncertainty out of trip planning and guarantee a smooth, stress-free ride to the destination of your choice. Several local businesses are now offering expanded shuttle services to and from the park’s most popular hubs including Newfound Gap, Alum Cave trailhead, and Laurel Falls trailhead where visitor demand for parking regularly exceeds capacity. Some shuttles maintain a regular route and schedule, while others can be reserved for any time and pick-up or drop-off location. Prices generally range from $10 to $25 per person depending on the destination and provider, and services cater to single passengers as well as groups of up to 15. Summer can be a particularly busy time in the Smokies, where annual visi- OUR PARK ON SOCIAL MEDIA tation regularly exceeds that of Yellowstone, Yosemite, and Grand Canyon national parks combined. As of March 2023, all vehicles parked anywhere in Great Smoky Mountains National Park for longer than 15 minutes are required to display a valid parking tag. Parking tags do not guarantee a specific parking spot in a specific location, and parking spaces continue to be available on a first come, first served basis. Mid-week and early mornings or late afternoons are usually the best times to secure parking, but if no spaces are available, visitors will need to try an alternative destination or time. For more information about shuttle services and a list of authorized providers, visit go.nps.gov/GRSMshuttles. Park staff cannot make shuttle reservations for visitors. The Backcountry Office offers additional trip-planning help at 865.436.1297. GreatSmoky MountainsNPS 86A-B68 PARKING TAG REQUIRED! Parking in the Smokies for more than 15 minutes requires a valid parking tag (annual tag pictured). For more info, scan code with camera app GreatSmokyNPS and SmokiesRoadsNPS GreatSmokyNPS S M O K I E S Visitor centers Sugarlands, Oconaluftee, and Cades Cove: open 9 a.m–5 p.m. June through September. Clingmans Dome: open 10 a.m.–6:30 p.m. June through August; 10 a.m.–6 p.m. September. GSM Institute at Tremont: open 10 a.m–4 p.m. Tuesday–Saturday only. Road closures • Cades Cove Loop Road is closed to vehicles on Wednesdays from May 3 through September 27 to allow for walking and biking. • All roads including Newfound Gap, Cataloochee, and Cades Cove Loop roads are subject to temporary closure due to dangerous driving conditions. Check twitter.com/SmokiesRoadsNPS for updates. Shuttle services Local shuttle services offer convenient transportation to and from the park’s most iconic destinations. Routes, schedules, pricing, and pick-up/drop-off locations vary. Visit go.nps.gov/GRSMShuttles for a list of authorized concessioners. Park weather In summer, heat, haze, and humidity are the norm by mid-June. Most precipitation occurs as afternoon thundershowers. By mid-September, a pattern of warm, sunny days and crisp, clear nights often begins. However, cool, rainy days also occur. Special events and ranger programs See page 5 for ranger programs and visit go.nps.gov/GRSMcalendar for a full calendar of events. SMOKIES GUIDE P L A N N E R Firewood Camping in the national park Make your reservation online at recreation.gov or call 877.444.6777. Site occupancy is limited to six people and two vehicles (a trailer = one vehicle). The maximum stay is 14 days. Campsites for larg
BIRDS A CHECKLIST FOR SPECIES IN GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS NATIONAL PARK KEY STATUS CODE A = Abundant; over 25 seen on a given day in proper habitat/season. C = Common; 5-25 seen per day in proper habitat/season. F = Fairly common; at least one individual seen per day in proper habitat/season. U = Uncommon; at least one individual seen per proper season or several per year. O = Occasional; one seen per year or less. R = Rare; has occurred in park at least once, but is not to be expected. P = Permanent Resident S = Summer Resident W = Winter Resident M = Migrant SPECIAL NOTATIONS * considered to breed within park *? suspected to breed within park cc = most commonly in Cades Cove he = high elevation (above 3,500’) ri = reintroduced (historic) = last recorded sighting 50+ years ago LOONS ❒ Red-throated Loon RM ❒ Common Loon OM GREBES ❒ Pied-billed Grebe UM ❒ Horned Grebe RM STORM-PETRELS ❒ Band-rumped Storm Petrel RM PELICANS AND CORMORANTS ❒ American White Pelican RM ❒ Double-crested Cormorant OM BITTERNS AND HERONS ❒ American Bittern OM ❒ Great Blue Heron UP cc ❒ Great Egret OM ❒ Little Blue Heron OM ❒ Cattle Egret RM ❒ Green Heron US* cc ❒ Yellow-crowned Night-Heron RS* (historic) GEESE AND DUCKS ❒ Snow Goose RM ❒ Ross’ Goose RW ❒ Brant RM ❒ Canada Goose UP* ❒ Wood Duck UP* cc ❒ Green-winged Teal RM cc ❒ American Black Duck RM cc ❒ Mallard UP* cc ❒ Gadwall RW cc ❒ Northern Pintail RM ❒ Blue-winged Teal UM, OW ❒ Northern Shoveler OM ❒ American Wigeon RW cc ❒ Redhead RM cc ❒ Canvasback RM cc ❒ Ring-necked Duck UW cc ❒ Lesser Scaup RM ❒ Greater Scaup RM ❒ Harlequin Duck RM ❒ White-winged Scoter RW ❒ Common Goldeneye RM cc ❒ Bufflehead UW cc ❒ Hooded Merganser UW cc ❒ Common Merganser OS* ❒ Red-breasted Merganser RW cc ❒ Ruddy Duck OW cc HAWKS AND EAGLES ❒ Osprey UM ❒ Swallow-tailed Kite RS cc ❒ Mississippi Kite RM ❒ Bald Eagle UMP* ❒ Northern Harrier UMW ❒ Sharp-shinned Hawk UP*? ❒ Cooper’s Hawk UP*? ❒ Northern Goshawk RM ❒ Red-shouldered Hawk OMW, US* cc ❒ Broad-winged Hawk FS*, CM ❒ Red-tailed Hawk UP*? ❒ Golden Eagle RMW, RS ❒ American Kestrel UMP* cc ❒ Merlin RM ❒ Peregrine Falcon OWM, US* ri GROUSE, TURKEYS AND QUAILS ❒ Ruffed Grouse FP* ❒ Wild Turkey CR* cc ❒ Northern Bobwhite UP* RAILS, GALLINULES AND COOTS ❒ King Rail RM ❒ Virginia Rail RM ❒ Sora OM ❒ Common Moorhen RM ❒ American Coot RMW cc CRANES AND VULTURES ❒ Sandhill Crane OM cc ❒ Black Vulture FP* cc ❒ Turkey Vulture CP* SHOREBIRDS ❒ American Golden-Plover RM ❒ Semipalmated Plover RM cc ❒ Killdeer UP* cc ❒ Greater Yellowlegs OM ❒ Lesser Yellowlegs RM ❒ Solitary Sandpiper OM ❒ Willet RM ❒ Spotted Sandpiper UM ❒ Least Sandpiper OM cc ❒ Ruff RM ❒ Short-billed Dowitcher RM ❒ Wilson’s Snipe UMW cc ❒ American Woodcock UP* ❒ Red-necked Phalarope RM ❒ Red Phalarope RM GULLS AND TERNS ❒ Laughing Gull RM ❒ Bonaparte’s Gull RM ❒ Ring-billed Gull OMW ❒ Herring Gull RW ❒ Sooty Tern RS DOVES ❒ Rock Dove OM ❒ Mourning Dove CP* cc CUCKOOS ❒ Black-billed Cuckoo US* ❒ Yellow-billed Cuckoo FS* OWLS ❒ Barn Owl OP (historic) ❒ Long-eared Owl RW cc ❒ Short-eared Owl OW cc ❒ Eastern Screech-Owl FP* ❒ Great Horned Owl UP* ❒ Barred Owl FP* ❒ Northern Saw-whet Owl FP* he NIGHTHAWKS AND NIGHTJARS ❒ Common Nighthawk OM ❒ Chuck-will’s-widow US* ❒ Eastern Whip-poor-will FS* SWIFTS AND HUMMINGBIRDS ❒ Chimney Swift CS* ❒ Ruby-throated Hummingbird FS,* CM-fall KINGFISHERS ❒ Belted Kingfisher FP* WOODPECKERS ❒ Red-headed Woodpecker OP*, UM cc ❒ Red-bellied Woodpecker FP* ❒ Yellow-bellied Sapsucker US*, FW ❒ Downy Woodpecker CP* ❒ Hairy Woodpecker FP* ❒ Red-cockaded Woodpecker OP* (historic) ❒ Northern Flicker FP* ❒ Pileated Woodpecker FP* FLYCATCHERS ❒ Olive-sided Flycatcher OS* UM he ❒ Eastern Wood-Pewee CS* ❒ Acadian Flycatcher CS* ❒ Alder Flycatcher OM RS ❒ Willow Flycatcher OS ❒ Least Flycatcher US* he ❒ Eastern Phoebe CP* (UW) ❒ Great Crested Flycatcher FS* ❒ Western Kingbird RM ❒ Eastern Kingbird FS* cc ❒ Scissor-tailed Flycatcher RM cc LARKS ❒ Horned Lark OMW SWALLOWS ❒ Purple Martin OS ❒ Tree Swallow UMS* ❒ Northern Rough-winged Swallow FSM* ❒ Bank Swallow OM ❒ Cliff Swallow OM ❒ Barn Swallow CS* GNATCATCHERS ❒ Blue-gray Gnatcatcher CS* THRUSHES ❒ Eastern Bluebird FP* cc ❒ Veery CS* he ❒ Gray-cheeked Thrush FM ❒ Swainson’s Thrush CM, OS*? ❒ Hermit Thrush FW, US* ❒ Wood Thrush CS* ❒ American Robin FP*, CM THRASHERS ❒ Gray Catbird FS*, OW ❒ Northern Mockingbird UP* ❒ Brown Thrasher FS,* UW SHRIKES ❒ Loggerhead Shrike OM cc STARLINGS ❒ European Starling UP* VIREOS ❒ White-eyed Vireo FS* ❒ Blue-headed Vireo CS* he ❒ Yellow-throated Vireo CS* ❒ Warbling Vireo OSM ❒ Philadelphia Vireo OM ❒ Red-eyed Vireo AS* PIPITS AND WAXWINGS ❒ Water Pipit OWM ❒ Cedar Waxwing FP* (erratic) JAYS, CROWS AND RAVENS ❒ Blue Jay FP* ❒ American Crow CP* ❒ Common Raven FP* he CHICKADEES AND TITMICE ❒ Carolina Chickadee CP* ❒ Black-capped Chickadee FP* he ❒ Tufted Titmouse CP* NUTHATCHES AND CREEPERS ❒ Red-breasted Nuthatch CP* he ❒ White-breasted Nuthatch FP* ❒ Brown-headed Nuthatch OP ❒ Br
BUTTERFLIES A CHECKLIST FOR SPECIES IN GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS NATIONAL PARK KEY STATUS CODE A = Abundant C = Common U = Uncommon O = Occasional R = Rare SPECIAL NOTATIONS + Non-native SWALLOWTAILS ❒ Pipevine Swallowtail A ❒ Black Swallowtail C ❒ Spicebush Swallowtail C ❒ Zebra Swallowtail U ❒ Giant Swallowtail U ❒ Eastern Tiger Swallowtail A ❒ Appalachian Tiger Swallowtail U WHITES AND SULFURS ❒ Falcate Orangetip U ❒ +Cabbage White C ❒ West Virginia White C ❒ Sleepy Orange C ❒ Clouded Sulphur C ❒ Cloudless Sulphur C ❒ Orange Sulphur A ❒ Olympia Marble R ❒ Barred Yellow R ❒ Dainty Sulphur O ❒ Checkered White U ❒ Little Yellow C COPPERS, HAIRSTREAKS AND BLUES ❒ Harvester U ❒ American Copper C ❒ Juniper Hairstreak R ❒ Gray Hairstreak C ❒ Banded Hairstreak U ❒ Red-banded Hairstreak C ❒ Striped Hairstreak R ❒ Great Purple Hairstreak R ❒ Eastern Tailed-Blue C ❒ Spring Azure C ❒ Summer Azure A ❒ Appalachian Azure C ❒ Silvery Blue R ❒ Brown Elfin C ❒ Eastern Pine Elfin U ❒ Henry’s Elfin O ❒ Frosted Elfin R ❒ Early Hairstreak R ❒ White M Hairstreak U ❒ King’s Hairstreak R ❒ Coral Hairstreak R BRUSHFOOTS ❒ Silvery Checkerspot C ❒ Baltimore Checkerspot R ❒ Pearl Crescent A ❒ Meadow Fritillary C ❒ Appalachian Brown U ❒ Gemmed Satyr U ❒ Carolina Satyr A ❒ Little Wood-Satyr C ❒ Common Wood-Nymph C ❒ Northern Pearly-Eye R ❒ American Snout U ❒ Hackberry Emperor U ❒ American Lady C ❒ Painted Lady U ❒ Common Buckeye C ❒ Red Admiral C ❒ Red-spotted Purple C ❒ Mourning Cloak C ❒ Question Mark C ❒ Eastern Comma C ❒ Green Comma U ❒ Gray Comma U ❒ Gulf Fritillary C ❒ Variegated Fritillary C ❒ Aphrodite Fritillary C ❒ Great Spangled Fritillary C ❒ Diana Fritillary U ❒ Viceroy R ❒ Monarch C ❒ Goatweed Leafwing R ❒ Tawny Emperor R ❒ Tawny Crescent R ❒ Northern Crescent O SKIPPERS ❒ Silver-spotted Skipper C ❒ Juvenal’s Duskywing C ❒ Horace’s Duskywing C ❒ Common Checkered-Skipper C ❒ Least Skipper C ❒ +European Skipper R ❒ Fiery Skipper C ❒ Long-tailed Skipper O ❒ Peck’s Skipper C ❒ Tawny-edged Skipper U ❒ Northern Broken-Dash U ❒ Sachem A ❒ Hobomok Skipper U ❒ Zabulon Skipper A ❒ Dun Skipper C ❒ Dusted Skipper R ❒ Hoary Edge O ❒ Lace-Winged Roadside Skipper R ❒ Pepper and Salt Skipper R ❒ Reversed Roadside Skipper O ❒ Common Roadside Skipper R ❒ Golden-banded Skipper U ❒ Brazilian Skipper O ❒ Wild Indigo Duskywing R ❒ Sleepy Duskywing U ❒ Dreamy Duskywing C ❒ Mottled Duskywing R ❒ Cobweb Skipper O ❒ Indian Skipper R ❒ Clouded Skipper C ❒ Swarthy Skipper U ❒ Twin-spot Skipper O ❒ Ocola Skipper O ❒ Crossline Skipper C ❒ Little Glassywing C ❒ Southern Cloudywing U ❒ Northern Cloudywing C REFERENCE Smith, Charles R., and Elizabeth A. Domingue. Butterflies and Moths of the Smokies. Gatlinburg, TN: Great Smoky Mountains Association, 2019. BUTTERFLY OBSERVATIONS Great Smoky Mountains National Park staff are interested in your observations of unusual butterflies in the park. Information that is of assistance to the park staff includes: •date and time •exact location •elevation •weather and temperature •number of individuals •your familiarity with the species Send observations of butterflies to: Research Coordinator Great Smoky Mountains National Park Twin Creeks Science and Education Center 1316 Cherokee Orchard Road Gatlinburg, TN 37738 Produced by Great Smoky Mountains Association in cooperation with Great Smoky Mountains National Park. This checklist is available online as a PDF at SmokiesInformation.org. 115 Park Headquarters Road Gatlinburg, TN 37738 865.436.7318 SmokiesInformation.org Revised 4-2020
MAMMALS A CHECKLIST FOR SPECIES IN GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS NATIONAL PARK KEY STATUS CODE C = Common U = Uncommon R = Rare X = Unknown SPECIAL NOTATIONS + Non-native (historic) = last recorded sighting 50+ years ago OPOSSUMS ❒ Virginia Opossum C SHREWS AND MOLES ❒ Masked Shrew C ❒ Southeastern Shrew R ❒ Water Shrew R ❒ Smoky Shrew C ❒ Long-tailed Shrew or Rock Shrew U ❒ Pygmy Shrew U ❒ Northern Short-tailed Shrew C ❒ Least Shrew U ❒ Star-nosed Mole R ❒ Hairy-tailed Mole C ❒ Eastern Mole U BATS ❒ Little Brown Bat R ❒ Northern Long-eared Bat R ❒ Indiana Bat R ❒ Eastern Small-footed Bat R ❒ Silver-haired Bat U ❒ Tri-colored Bat R ❒ Big Brown Bat U ❒ Eastern Red Bat C ❒ Hoary Bat U ❒ Rafinesque’s Big-eared Bat U ❒ Evening Bat R ❒ Seminole Bat R ❒ Gray Bat R RABBITS ❒ Eastern Cottontail C ❒ Appalachian Cottontail R SQUIRRELS AND RELATIVES ❒ Eastern Chipmunk C ❒ Woodchuck or Groundhog U ❒ Eastern Gray Squirrel C ❒ Eastern Fox Squirrel R ❒ Red Squirrel C ❒ Southern Flying Squirrel C ❒ Carolina Northern Flying Squirrel R BEAVERS ❒ American Beaver U MOUSE-LIKE RODENTS ❒ Eastern Harvest Mouse R ❒ Deer Mouse C ❒ White-footed Mouse C ❒ Cotton Mouse U ❒ Golden Mouse U ❒ +House Mouse R ❒ Meadow Vole R ❒ Rock Vole U ❒ Woodland Vole U ❒ Southern Red-backed Vole C ❒ Southern Bog Lemming U ❒ Muskrat C ❒ Allegheny Woodrat R ❒ Hispid Cotton Rat R ❒ Marsh Rice Rat (historic) ❒ +Black Rat R ❒ +Norway Rat R ❒ Meadow Jumping Mouse R ❒ Woodland Jumping Mouse U CANINES ❒ Coyote C ❒ Red Fox U ❒ Gray Fox C ❒ Red Wolf (historic) ❒ Gray Wolf (historic) BEARS ❒ American Black Bear C RACOONS ❒ Raccoon C SKUNKS ❒ Eastern Spotted Skunk R ❒ Striped Skunk C WEASELS AND RELATIVES ❒ Long-tailed Weasel C ❒ Least Weasel X ❒ Mink U ❒ Northern River Otter U ❒ Fisher (historic) FELINES ❒ Bobcat C ❒ Mountain Lion or Cougar (historic) EVEN-TOED UNGULATES ❒ +Wild Boar C ❒ American Bison (historic) ❒ White-tailed Deer C ❒ Elk or Wapiti C ARMORED MAMMALS ❒ Nine-banded Armadillo X REFERENCE NPSpecies—The National Park Service Biodiversity Database (online). Fort Collins, CO: National Park Service, Natural Resource Stewardship and Science, 2020. Pivorun, Edward, et al. Mammals of the Smokies. Gatlinburg, TN: Great Smoky Mountains Association, 2009. MAMMAL OBSERVATIONS Great Smoky Mountains National Park staff are interested in your observations of unusual mammals in the park. Information that is of assistance to the park staff includes: •date and time •exact location •elevation •weather and temperature •number of individuals •your familiarity with the species Send observations of mammals to: Research Coordinator Great Smoky Mountains National Park Twin Creeks Science and Education Center 1316 Cherokee Orchard Road Gatlinburg, TN 37738 Produced by Great Smoky Mountains Association in cooperation with Great Smoky Mountains National Park. This checklist is available online as a PDF at SmokiesInformation.org. 115 Park Headquarters Road Gatlinburg, TN 37738 865.436.7318 SmokiesInformation.org Revised 4-2020
the the of ? 4 6 7 λε ίδος τερόν AND POLLINATOR IN YOUR www.nrcs.usda.gov/pollinators www.fws.gov/pollinators www.fs.fed.us/wildflowers/pollinators www.nps.gov/subjects/pollinators 32
REPTILES AND AMPHIBIANS A CHECKLIST FOR SPECIES IN GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS NATIONAL PARK KEY STATUS CODE C = Common U = Uncommon R = Rare X = Unknown SPECIAL NOTATIONS + Non-native (historic) = last recorded sighting 50+ years ago REPTILES TURTLES ❒ Common Snapping Turtle C ❒ Stripeneck Musk Turtle R ❒ Common Musk Turtle or Stinkpot Turtle R ❒ Eastern Box Turtle C ❒ Northern Map Turtle R ❒ Midland Painted Turtle C ❒ Eastern Spiny Softshell U ❒ Cumberland Slider R LIZARDS ❒ Green Anole C ❒ Eastern Fence Lizard C ❒ Eastern Six-lined Racerunner C ❒ Little Brown Skink C ❒ Five-lined Skink C ❒ Southeastern Five-lined Skink R ❒ Broadhead Skink C ❒ Coal Skink R ❒ Eastern Slender Glass Lizard C SNAKES ❒ Northern Water Snake C ❒ Queen Snake U ❒ Brown Snake C ❒ Northern Red-bellied Snake C ❒ Eastern Garter Snake C ❒ Eastern Smooth Earth Snake U ❒ Eastern Hog-nosed Snake U ❒ Ring-necked Snake C ❒ Eastern Worm Snake C ❒ Northern Black Racer C ❒ Northern Rough Green Snake C ❒ Red Corn Snake C ❒ Eastern Rat Snake C ❒ Northern Pine Snake R ❒ Eastern Kingsnake C ❒ Black Kingsnake C ❒ Eastern Milk Snake U ❒ Scarlet Kingsnake (historic) ❒ Mole Kingsnake U ❒ Northern Scarlet Snake R ❒ Southeastern Crowned Snake U ❒ Northern Copperhead C ❒ Timber Rattlesnake C AMPHIBIANS SALAMANDERS ❒ Eastern Hellbender U ❒ Common Mudpuppy R ❒ Mole Salamander R ❒ Marbled Salamander U ❒ Spotted Salamander U ❒ Red-spotted Newt C ❒ Spotted Dusky Salamander C ❒ Santeetlah Dusky Salamander C ❒ Seal Salamander C ❒ Black-bellied Salamander C ❒ Shovel-nosed Salamander U ❒ Ocoee Salamander C ❒ Imitator Salamander C ❒ Pygmy Salamander C ❒ Seepage Salamander R ❒ Southern Red-backed Salamander C ❒ Southern Zigzag Salamander U ❒ Northern Slimy Salamander C ❒ Southern Appalachian Salamander C ❒ Red-cheeked Salamander C ❒ Southern Gray-cheeked Salamander C ❒ Four-toed Salamander U ❒ Black-chinned Red Salamander C ❒ Mud Salamander R ❒ Blue Ridge Spring Salamander U ❒ Cave Salamander R ❒ Long-tailed Salamander U ❒ Three-lined Salamander R ❒ Junaluska Salamander R ❒ Blue Ridge Two-lined Salamander C ❒ Green Salamander (historic) FROGS AND TOADS ❒ Eastern Spadefoot R ❒ Eastern American Toad C ❒ Fowler’s Toad U ❒ Eastern Cricket Frog X ❒ Cope’s Gray Tree Frog U ❒ +Green Tree Frog U ❒ Northern Spring Peeper C ❒ Upland Chorus Frog U ❒ Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad R ❒ American Bullfrog C ❒ Green Frog C ❒ Pickerel Frog U ❒ Leopard Frog (historic) ❒ Wood Frog C REFERENCE NPSpecies—The National Park Service Biodiversity Database (online). Fort Collins, CO: National Park Service, Natural Resource Stewardship and Science, 2020. Tilley, Stephen G., and James E. Huheey. Reptiles and Amphibians of the Smokies. Gatlinburg, TN: Great Smoky Mountains Association, 2004. REPTILE AND AMPHIBIAN OBSERVATIONS Great Smoky Mountains National Park staff are interested in your observations of unusual reptiles and amphibians in the park. Information that is of assistance to the park staff includes: •date and time •exact location •elevation •weather and temperature •number of individuals •your familiarity with the species Send observations of reptiles or amphibians to: Research Coordinator Great Smoky Mountains National Park Twin Creeks Science and Education Center 1316 Cherokee Orchard Road Gatlinburg, TN 37738 Produced by Great Smoky Mountains Association in cooperation with Great Smoky Mountains National Park. This checklist is available online as a PDF at SmokiesInformation.org. 115 Park Headquarters Road Gatlinburg, TN 37738 865.436.7318 SmokiesInformation.org Revised 4-2020
World Heritage Sites in the United States Governor’s House, La Fortaleza and San Juan National Historical Site Red-footed booby, Papahaˉnaumokuaˉ kea Morning Glory Pool, Yellowstone National Park © HARVEY BARRISON © KRIS KRUG JEFF SULLIVAN PHOTOGRAPHY 2 Kluane /  Wrangell-St. Elias / Glacier Bay /  Tatshenshini-Alsek 1 Statue of Liberty Grand Canyon National Park © MICHAEL BELL PIXABAY/SKEEZE © MICHAEL LOYD Olympic National Park 3 WA SH I N GTO N - 19 81 Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park vii • ix vii • viii • ix • x A L A SK A (US), C A N A DA - 1979 Features temperate rainforest, glaciers, peaks, alpine meadows, old-growth forest, and wilderness coastline. Critical habitat for endangered species including northern spotted owl and bull trout. www.nps.gov/olym Over 24 million acres of wild lands and waters are changed by glaciers and volcanic activity. www.nps.gov/glba, www.nps.gov/wrst www.pc.gc.ca/en/pn-np/yt/kluane www.env.gov.bc.ca/bcparks/explore vii • ix © MIKE CRISS Montana (US), Canada - 1995 World’s first international peace park. Rich biodiversity and outstanding scenery with prairie, forest, alpine, and glacial features. www.nps.gov/glac www.pc.gc.ca/en/pn-np/ab/waterton/ Grinnell Point © MIKE KOCH Old Faithful © MARK STEVENS 23 © STEVE BOND Yellowstone National Park vii • viii • ix • x Renowned for geothermal features, Yellowstone has the world’s largest concentration of geysers. Protects grizzly bears, wolves, bison, and elk. www.nps.gov/yell iii • iv I L L I N O I S - 19 82 With over 1,100 properties, the World Heritage List This urban complex flourished 1000– 1350 CE (Common Era). Regional center for prehistoric Mississippian culture. www.cahokiamounds.org shows a shared global commitment to preserve the world’s most important natural and cultural sites. Monks Mound Learn more about the World Heritage sites in the 22 4 Cahokia Mounds State Historic Site Preserved for All Humanity W YO M I N G, M O N TA N A , I DA H O - 1978 © JIM WARK/AIRPHOTO United States, described here with selection criteria Redwood National and State Parks This gift from France to the United States is a symbol of international friendship, peace, progress, freedom, democracy, and human migration. Renowned for art and engineering. www.nps.gov/stli World Heritage Sites in the United States can be pur- Coastal mountain home to California brown pelicans, sea lions, bald eagles, and ancient redwood forest—the world’s tallest trees. www.nps.gov/redw i • vi N E W YO R K - 19 8 4 scription year, and websites. The Passport booklet C A L I F O R N I A - 19 8 0 Statue of Liberty 5 in Roman numerals (details other side), location, in- vii • ix Black bear, Great Smoky Mountains National Park chased at www.eparks.com. For more on the World Pixabay Heritage List: whc.unesco.org/en/statesparties/us. © AMY HUDECHEK Natural Papahaˉnaumokuaˉkea iii • vi • viii • ix • x Cultural Mixed 21 6 H AWA I I - 2010 Independence Hall This vast living “cultural seascape” embodies kinship of people to place in Native Hawaiian cosmology. Includes seamounts, endemic species, critical habitats, and coral reefs. www.papahanaumokuakea.gov vi P EN N S Y LVA N I A - 1979 An international symbol of freedom and democracy, this 18th-century building is where the Declaration of Independence and Constitution were created and signed. www.nps.gov/inde Greg McFall / NOAA 20 Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park © TODD LANDRY viii H AWA I I - 19 87 Earth’s greatest mass of volcanoes, including Mauna Loa and Kilauea, tower over a “hotspot” in the mantle. Continuous geologic activity builds an ever changing landscape home to rare and endemic species. www.nps.gov/havo 21 7 PACIFIC OCEAN 0 Hawaii Everglades National Park viii • ix • x 20 F LO R I DA - 1979 800 Kilometers 0 800 Miles North America’s largest subtropical wilderness has several vital habitats for plants and animals including Florida panthers and manatees. Key area for bird migration and breeding. www.nps.gov/ever NPS Yosemite National Park 19 vii • viii © CARLTON WARD JR. C A L I F O R N I A - 19 8 4 Glacial erosion helped sculpt this scenic landscape. Soaring granite cliffs, polished domes, high waterfalls, sequoia groves, wilderness, deep-cut valleys, and alpine meadow habitats. www.nps.gov/yose 18 Chaco Culture iii Castillo San Felipe del Morro N E W M E X I CO - 19 87 © ANGEL LOPEZ Prehistoric, monumental masonry structures in Chaco Canyon, along with a network of roads and outlier sites like Aztec Ruins, exhibit the vast influence of the ancestral Puebloan culture on the Southwestern landscape. www.nps.gov/azru, www.nps.gov/chcu © JOCELYN PANTALEON HIDALGO The 20th-century Architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright La Fortaleza and San Juan National Historic Site vi © OJEFFREY PHOTOGRAPHY P U ERTO R I CO - 19 8 3 ii Strategic defensive structures represent early European military architecture, e

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