"Fall colors near the new perimeter trail bridge" by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

Greenbelt

Park - Maryland

Greenbelt Park, located in Greenbelt, Maryland, is managed by the United States National Park Service. The forested park lies approximately 10 miles (16 km) northeast of Washington, D.C., and is situated just within the Capital Beltway (which bounds the park to the northeast). The park land was originally intended to form part of the green belt surrounding the city of Greenbelt. The southern portion was assigned to the National Park Service, thus forming the park, while another section became part of the Henry A. Wallace Beltsville Agricultural Research Center (BARC).

location

maps

Official Visitor Map of Greenbelt Park Maryland. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Greenbelt - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Greenbelt Park Maryland. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official Visitor Map of Civil War Defenses of Washington in District of Columbia, Maryland and Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Civil War Defenses of Washington - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Civil War Defenses of Washington in District of Columbia, Maryland and Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official Visitor Map of Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park (NHP) in Washington D.C., Maryland and West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Chesapeake & Ohio Canal - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park (NHP) in Washington D.C., Maryland and West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/gree/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greenbelt_Park Greenbelt Park, located in Greenbelt, Maryland, is managed by the United States National Park Service. The forested park lies approximately 10 miles (16 km) northeast of Washington, D.C., and is situated just within the Capital Beltway (which bounds the park to the northeast). The park land was originally intended to form part of the green belt surrounding the city of Greenbelt. The southern portion was assigned to the National Park Service, thus forming the park, while another section became part of the Henry A. Wallace Beltsville Agricultural Research Center (BARC). Enjoy affordable camping, hiking, and peaceful forest surroundings just ten miles from Washington, DC! Off I-95 South Take Exit 23 Route 201 Kenilworth Avenue South(toward Bladensburg). (this will be a left). Drive on Kenilworth Avenue (Route 201). Once crossing over I-95, you will see sign for Route 193 Greenbelt Road. Veer right to Take Route 193 East. Take a left on Greenbelt Road . (Greenbelt Road is Route 193 and is an overpass over Route 201) The park entrance is a quarter mile on the right hand side. Ranger Station The Ranger Station is located near the campground entrance, two miles from the park headquarters and park entrance. Ranger station is open seven days a week from 8:00 a.m. until 3:45 p.m. Campground and Ranger Station is two miles from the park entrance. Upon arrival at park entrance off Greenbelt Road (Route 193) Proceed to stop sign. Take a right at stop sign and proceed two miles to Ranger Station near the campground Greenbelt Park Campground The park features a 172 site campground and is open year round. The campground is known for its affordability, safety, peaceful surroundings, and National Park Service hospitality. Campers must pay for sites via the online reservation system. Camp site 20.00 Three tents and up to six people per campsite. Campground consists of tent and RV Sites Tent in the Greenbelt campground tent in the campground Camp within Thirteen miles of the Nation's Capital Greenbelt Park Campground New grill new grill in the campground Enjoy a campfire in the new grill under the stars at Greenbelt Greenbelt Park Maryland campground map Overhead view of campground with numbered camp sites and locations of buildings Enjoy a campfire in the new grill under the stars at Greenbelt RV in the Greenbelt Park, Maryland campground RV in the campground Camp in the Urban Oasis of the Greenbelt Park campground Tent in the Greenbelt Park, Maryland campground tent in the campground Camp within 13 miles of Washington, D.C. Tent in the Greenbelt Park campground Tent in the Greenbelt Park campground Camp within 13 miles of the Nation's Capital New grill in the Greenbelt Park Maryland campground a round back grill with grill on top on a campsite in the Greenbelt Park campground Enjoy a campfire in the new grill under the stars at Greenbelt Trees in Greenbelt Park, Maryland trees in Greenbelt Park Enjoy the beautiful forest in the Urban Oasis of Greenbelt Park,Maryland Father and son relaxing in the Greenbelt Park campground Father and son sitting in chairs reading in the Greenbelt Park campground A family weekend getaway at the Greenbelt Park campground Fall Colors in the Sweetgum Picnic Area, Greenbelt Park, Maryland Fall Colors in the Sweetgum Picnic Area, Greenbelt Park, Maryland Fall Colors in the Sweetgum Picnic Area, Greenbelt Park, Maryland Perimeter Trail bridge in Greenbelt Park bridge in Greenbelt Park Enjoy the beautiful trails of Greenbelt Park Spring and Fall Campfire Programs at Sunset campfire in the forefront and people watching a campfire program in the background Enjoy a free campfire program under the stars at the Greenbelt Park campground Pawpaw: Small Tree, Big Impact Pawpaw are small trees that don't grow past 100 feet. Yet they have a big influence-- they're the most commonly observed sapling in our National Capital Region forests. Pawpaw trees are virtually immune to deer browse and also produce the largest edible fruit native to North America! A hand holds a lumpy green pawpaw fruit NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Greenbelt Park, Maryland Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] tent in campsite Forest Regeneration 2018 In 2018, tree seedlings and small saplings are in short supply in the parks of the National Capital Region. Without these trees of tomorrow, what will our forests look like? A forest plot in Rock Creek Park showing some vegetation recovery. American Eels in the Potomac Watershed American eels are found everywhere along the Atlantic Coast, but many aspects of these fish remain poorly understood. They are perhaps one of the most mysterious fish in the Potomac watershed. Hands hold a 2 to 3 foot long eel over a red container. Forest Regeneration 2017 Tree seedlings and small saplings are in short supply in the parks of the National Capital Region. Without these trees of tomorrow, what will our forests look like? A forest plot showing tree seedling and low-growing plant recovery. Veteran Story: Matthew Carroll After a career in the U.S. Air Force, Matthew Carroll joined the National Park Service as the superintendent of Greenbelt Park and the Baltimore-Washington Parkway. Matthew Carroll Knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding Lyme disease prevention among employees, day visitors, and campers at Greenbelt Park A 2010 survey reveals that while perceived risk of Lyme disease and tick encounters was high in the park, use of preventive measures was low. Black-legged tick, Ixodes scapularis Stream Restoration Dreams: Stage Zero Learn “stage zero” stream restoration basics and how they could be applied in Mid-Atlantic streams. Water spreads across the ground around standing and fallen trees Ash Tree Update 2017 The state of ash trees in 2017 in the National Capital Region after more than 10 years of harm from the invasive emerald ash borer. A white ash leaf Forest Regeneration 2019 In 2019 tree seedlings and small saplings are in short supply in National Capital Area parks. Without these trees of tomorrow, what will our forests look like? A brown bird with a white breast and dark spots on its chest stands on the leaf-littered ground. Oak Decline Learn more about oak decline where a host of stressors interact to weaken trees over time, leading to what becomes "death by a thousand cuts." Looking up into the canopy of a mature oak showing symptoms of oak decline. Spring Amphibian Timeline Learn how the progression of amphibian appearances unfurls every spring. A gray tree frog clings to a small tree branch. Amphibian Diversity & Habitat Connectivity Habitat fragmentation is a major threat to amphibian communities, especially in National Capital Region parks at risk due to the region's growing urbanization. A small frog crouches on a lichen-covered rock. Memorials for the Future Memorials for the Future, is a competition that aims to rethink the way we develop and experience memorials in Washington, D.C. Memorials for the Future Logo National Park Getaway: Greenbelt Park Welcome to an urban oasis. Although most visitors find it hard to believe, Greenbelt Park is just 12 miles from Washington, D.C. The peace and quiet that you'll find here evoke images of a dense forest or mountain resort. That's what you’ll experience when you visit Greenbelt Park—un-trampled nature in a region where most wild spaces have disappeared. a road in a forest Forest Soils Highlights from a 2007-2017 study of soils in National Capital Region Network I&M-monitored parks. Includes discussion of parent materials, heavy metal soil pollutants like lead, and how past land use effects O horizons. Collage of 6 color photos of soil profiles showing colors from orange-y reds to browns and grays. Stiltgrass and Tree Seedling Recovery Recent analysis at Maryland's Catoctin Mountain Park shows Japanese stiltgrass does not limit the growth of tree seedlings in a forest recovering from deer overpopulation. Invasive Japanese stiltgrass blankets the sides of a shady forest road. Spotted Lanternfly 101 What you need to know about spotted lanternfly: a new, invasive, insect pest approaching the National Parks of the Mid-Atlantic. A spotted lanternfly with wings spread showing namesake spots Spotted Lanternfly in Perspective While spotted lanternfly and emerald ash borer are both invasive insect pests, introduced from Asia, that feed on trees (primarily), they have few other similarities. Learn how they differ in host preferences, feeding mode, and life cycle. A spotted lanternfly with black wingspots on a tree branch Brood X Periodical Cicadas FAQ Learn about the Brood X periodical cicadas that emerged in 2021 throughout the Mid-Atlantic U.S. A perched periodical cicada with red eyes and orange wings Forest Regeneration 2020 What is the future of our forests? A look at forest regeneration capacity in National Capital Area national parks based on 2020 monitoring data. hand holding a leaflet on a white ash seedling National Capital Region PRISM and Invasive Species Since invasive species don’t recognize park boundaries, we need to work together with our partners, neighbors, and other federal and state entities to manage across borders. We can’t do it alone! a hand holds a rosette of green leaves over the water Sea Level Rise in the DC Area Learn about current and projected rates of sea level rise in the greater DC area, based on local water level data collected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) A tall white cylinder attached to a wooden pier with Hains Point in the background. Beech Trees in the National Capital Area American beech (Fagus grandifolia), the most common tree species in National Capital Area parks, is currently facing the emerging threat of Beech Leaf Disease (BLD). A forest with healthy green leafed beech trees Forest Regeneration 2021 The latest look at forest regeneration capacity in National Capital Area national parks based on monitoring data from 2021. Green forest showing healthy understory of oak seedlings. Vines on Trees at Forest Edges Learn how climbing vines affect tree growth and mortality in National Capital Region park forests. This material was originally presented in a 2016 resource brief. Vines climb on trees at the forest edge at Rock Creek's Barnard Hill Park. Forest Regeneration 2022 Tree seedlings and small saplings are still in short supply in National Capital Region national parks. A look at forest regeneration capacity based on monitoring data from 2022. Sunlight filtering through a green forest with green seedlings covering most of the forest floor. The Struggle for Sovereignty: Series Overview Since the founding of the United States, Native American leaders, delegates, and activists have traveled to the nation’s capital to protest violations of their homelands and to assert their sovereign rights as independent nations. These articles focus on a series of major protests from 1968-1978, in which Native peoples from across the United States converged on Washington, D.C. to bring their issues to the nation’s capital. Tipi and flag that reads Series: The Struggle for Sovereignty: American Indian Activism in the Nation’s Capital, 1968-1978 From 1968 to 1978, American Indian activists engaged in a series of marches to the nation's capital to demand rights for their tribes and communities. Foremost among their demands was that the United States honor its treaties with Indigenous nations. These movements laid the foundation for the ongoing struggle for Native rights in the United States. Read on to learn more about this important chapter in Native American history. Group of people marching in front of statue NCR's Forest Interior Birds Explore how forest interior breeding birds are faring in National Capital Region (NCR) parks. These species prefer the shadiest and quietest core of the forest landscape and are excellent indicators of a healthy forest ecosystem. We look at data on wood thrush, ovenbird, Kentucky warbler, Louisiana waterthrush, hooded warbler, and scarlet tanager from a report summarizing population trends for forest birds in NCR parks. a woodthrush perched on a branch with blurred green foliage background Seep Shrimp Learn about the tiny creatures that live in our forest's seeps. three researchers in high-vis yellow gear search for shrimp in a snowy forest Forest Regeneration 2023 Tree seedlings and small saplings are slowly increasing in National Capital Region national parks. A look at forest regeneration capacity based on monitoring data from 2023. Three people stand in a forest, smiling and pointing to a large tree trunk between them. Incised Fumewort (Corydalis incisa) Incised fumewort (Corydalis incisa) is a "high risk" invasive plant in the mid-Atlantic US with the potential to become widespread and cause a lot of damage. Learn how to identify it, differentiate it from the native yellow corydalis (Corydalis flavula), and help be on the lookout for this invasive species. A cluster of incised fumewort with green leaves and bright purple tubular flowers with violet ends. When Forests Come Down with a Bug: Forest Pests in the Greater DC Area Beech leaf disease, emerald ash borer, spotted lanternfly, spongy moth, oak decline and oak wilt are all pests present in National Capital Region (NCR) park forests. Learn about their effects and spread based on NCR Inventory & Monitoring data, and get the heads up on elm zigzag sawfly and beech bark disease. A black and red insect sits on a leaf. Series: Amphibian Monitoring in the National Capital Region Amphibians are a crucial part of both aquatic and land ecosystems, and National Capital Region parks are home to at least 20 different amphibian species. Learn how amphibian populations are changing based on more than fifteen years of NPS monitoring by the National Capital Region Inventory & Monitoring Network. Northern red salamander on a patch of sun dappled moss NCP East Amphibian Monitoring 2023 National Capital Parks - East is hopping! Learn what recent amphibian monitoring data shows us about amphibian populations in the park! American toad (Bufo americanus)

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