by Alex Gugel , all rights reserved

Glacier

National Park - Montana

Glacier National Park is a 1,583-sq.-mi. wilderness area in Montana's Rocky Mountains, with glacier-carved peaks and valleys running to the Canadian border. It's crossed by the mountainous Going-to-the-Sun Road. Among more than 700 miles of hiking trails, it has a route to photogenic Hidden Lake. Other activities include backpacking, cycling and camping. Diverse wildlife ranges from mountain goats to grizzly bears.

location

maps

Official Visitor Map of Glacier National Park (NP) in Montana. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Glacier - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Glacier National Park (NP) in Montana. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Detail Map of Apgar in Glacier National Park (NP) in Montana. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Glacier - Apgar Detail

Detail Map of Apgar in Glacier National Park (NP) in Montana. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Detail Map of Saint Mary in Glacier National Park (NP) in Montana. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Glacier - Saint Mary Detail

Detail Map of Saint Mary in Glacier National Park (NP) in Montana. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Detail Map of Waterton Lakes in Glacier National Park (NP) in Montana. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Glacier - Waterton Lakes Detail

Detail Map of Waterton Lakes in Glacier National Park (NP) in Montana. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of Groomed Snowmobile Trails in the Stillwater/Canyon Creek, Desert Mtn. Swan Lake, & Skyland Areas in Flathead National Forest (NF) in Montana. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Flathead - Flathead Area Snowmoible

Map of Groomed Snowmobile Trails in the Stillwater/Canyon Creek, Desert Mtn. Swan Lake, & Skyland Areas in Flathead National Forest (NF) in Montana. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Recreation Map showing Montana Academy Guided Hikes (West) in Flathead National Forest (NF) in Montana. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Flathead - Montana Academy - West

Recreation Map showing Montana Academy Guided Hikes (West) in Flathead National Forest (NF) in Montana. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Recreation Map showing Montana Academy Guided Hikes (East) in Flathead National Forest (NF) in Montana. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Flathead - Montana Academy - East

Recreation Map showing Montana Academy Guided Hikes (East) in Flathead National Forest (NF) in Montana. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Trails Map of Bike Adventures Guided Tours in Glacier View and Tally Lake Ranger Districts in Flathead National Forest (NF) in Montana. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Flathead - Tally Lake - Bike Adventures

Trails Map of Bike Adventures Guided Tours in Glacier View and Tally Lake Ranger Districts in Flathead National Forest (NF) in Montana. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Recreation Map showing KRMC Journey to Wellness Guided Hikes in Tally Lake Ranger District in Flathead National Forest (NF) in Montana. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Flathead - Tally Lake - KRMC Journey to Wellness

Recreation Map showing KRMC Journey to Wellness Guided Hikes in Tally Lake Ranger District in Flathead National Forest (NF) in Montana. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Recreation Map showing Guided Tours Routes in Tally Lake Ranger District in Flathead National Forest (NF) in Montana. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Flathead - Tally Lake - Guided Tours

Recreation Map showing Guided Tours Routes in Tally Lake Ranger District in Flathead National Forest (NF) in Montana. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Tally Lake Ranger District in Flathead National Forest (NF) in Montana. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Flathead MVUM - Tally Lake 2019

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Tally Lake Ranger District in Flathead National Forest (NF) in Montana. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Swan Lake Ranger District in Flathead National Forest (NF) in Montana. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Flathead MVUM - Swan Lake 2019

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Swan Lake Ranger District in Flathead National Forest (NF) in Montana. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Spotted Bear Ranger District in Flathead National Forest (NF) in Montana. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Flathead MVUM - Spotted Bear 2019

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Spotted Bear Ranger District in Flathead National Forest (NF) in Montana. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Bathymetry Survey Map of Middle Diamond Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.Middle Diamond Lake - Bathymetry Survey Map

Bathymetry Survey Map of Middle Diamond Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.

Bathymetry Survey Map of Skyles Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.Skyles Lake - Bathymetry Survey Map

Bathymetry Survey Map of Skyles Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.

Bathymetry Survey Map of Bootjack Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.Bootjack Lake - Bathymetry Survey Map

Bathymetry Survey Map of Bootjack Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.

Bathymetry Survey Map of Beaver Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.Beaver Lake - Bathymetry Survey Map

Bathymetry Survey Map of Beaver Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.

Bathymetry Survey Map of Spencer Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.Spencer Lake - Bathymetry Survey Map

Bathymetry Survey Map of Spencer Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.

Bathymetry Survey Map of Sherburne Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.Sherburne Lake - Bathymetry Survey Map

Bathymetry Survey Map of Sherburne Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.

Bathymetry Survey Map of Lake Five in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.Lake Five - Bathymetry Survey Map

Bathymetry Survey Map of Lake Five in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.

Bathymetry Survey Map of Alpha Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.Alpha Lake - Bathymetry Survey Map

Bathymetry Survey Map of Alpha Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.

Bathymetry Survey Map of Lion Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.Lion Lake - Bathymetry Survey Map

Bathymetry Survey Map of Lion Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.

Bathymetry Survey Map of Bailey Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.Bailey Lake - Bathymetry Survey Map

Bathymetry Survey Map of Bailey Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.

Bathymetry Survey Map of Fawn Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.Fawn Lake - Bathymetry Survey Map

Bathymetry Survey Map of Fawn Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.

Bathymetry Survey Map of Doris Lake 2 in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.Doris Lake 2 - Bathymetry Survey Map

Bathymetry Survey Map of Doris Lake 2 in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.

Bathymetry Survey Map of Doris Lake 1 in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.Doris Lake 1 - Bathymetry Survey Map

Bathymetry Survey Map of Doris Lake 1 in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.

Bathymetry Survey Map of Woods Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.Woods Lake - Bathymetry Survey Map

Bathymetry Survey Map of Woods Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.

Bathymetry Survey Map of Tepee Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.Tepee Lake - Bathymetry Survey Map

Bathymetry Survey Map of Tepee Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.

Bathymetry Survey Map of Little Beaver Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.Little Beaver Lake - Bathymetry Survey Map

Bathymetry Survey Map of Little Beaver Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.

Bathymetry Survey Map of Moose Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.Moose Lake - Bathymetry Survey Map

Bathymetry Survey Map of Moose Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.

Bathymetry Survey Map of Whitefish Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.Whitefish Lake - Bathymetry Survey Map

Bathymetry Survey Map of Whitefish Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.

Bathymetry Survey Map of Hanson-doyle Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.Hanson-doyle Lake - Bathymetry Survey Map

Bathymetry Survey Map of Hanson-doyle Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.

Bathymetry Survey Map of Murray Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.Murray Lake - Bathymetry Survey Map

Bathymetry Survey Map of Murray Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.

Bathymetry Survey Map of Lower Stillwater Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.Lower Stillwater Lake - Bathymetry Survey Map

Bathymetry Survey Map of Lower Stillwater Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.

Bathymetry Survey Map of Tally Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.Tally Lake - Bathymetry Survey Map

Bathymetry Survey Map of Tally Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.

Bathymetry Survey Map of Diamond Lake - Flathead in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.Diamond Lake - Flathead - Bathymetry Survey Map

Bathymetry Survey Map of Diamond Lake - Flathead in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.

Bathymetry Survey Map of Camas Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.Camas Lake - Bathymetry Survey Map

Bathymetry Survey Map of Camas Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.

Bathymetry Survey Map of Strawberry Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.Strawberry Lake - Bathymetry Survey Map

Bathymetry Survey Map of Strawberry Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.

Bathymetry Survey Map of Ashley Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.Ashley Lake - Bathymetry Survey Map

Bathymetry Survey Map of Ashley Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.

Bathymetry Survey Map of Dickey Lake - Flathead in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.Dickey Lake - Flathead - Bathymetry Survey Map

Bathymetry Survey Map of Dickey Lake - Flathead in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.

Bathymetry Survey Map of Redrock Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.Redrock Lake - Bathymetry Survey Map

Bathymetry Survey Map of Redrock Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.

Bathymetry Survey Map of Evangeline Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.Evangeline Lake - Bathymetry Survey Map

Bathymetry Survey Map of Evangeline Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.

Bathymetry Survey Map of Skiumah Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.Skiumah Lake - Bathymetry Survey Map

Bathymetry Survey Map of Skiumah Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.

Bathymetry Survey Map of Blanchard Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.Blanchard Lake - Bathymetry Survey Map

Bathymetry Survey Map of Blanchard Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.

Bathymetry Survey Map of Beta Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.Beta Lake - Bathymetry Survey Map

Bathymetry Survey Map of Beta Lake in Montana. Published by Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks.

Highway Map of Montana. Published by the Montana Department of Transportation.Montana State - Montana Highway Map

Highway Map of Montana. Published by the Montana Department of Transportation.

https://www.nps.gov/glac https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glacier_National_Park_(U.S.) Glacier National Park is a 1,583-sq.-mi. wilderness area in Montana's Rocky Mountains, with glacier-carved peaks and valleys running to the Canadian border. It's crossed by the mountainous Going-to-the-Sun Road. Among more than 700 miles of hiking trails, it has a route to photogenic Hidden Lake. Other activities include backpacking, cycling and camping. Diverse wildlife ranges from mountain goats to grizzly bears. A showcase of melting glaciers, alpine meadows, carved valleys, and spectacular lakes. With over 700 miles of trails, Glacier is a paradise for adventurous visitors seeking wilderness steeped in human history. Relive the days of old through historic chalets, lodges, and the famous Going-to-the-Sun Road. Glacier National Park is located in the northwest corner of Montana along the spine of the Rocky Mountains. By car you can access Glacier via Highway 2, which runs along the southern boundary of the park. You can reach the east side of the park via Highway 89. The nearest airports are in Kalispell and Great Falls, Montana. Apgar Visitor Center Apgar Visitor Center is located 2 miles east of the West Glacier entrance to the park. Rangers are on duty to assist with trip planning. The visitor center is the hub for the Going-to-the-Sun Road shuttle system on the west side of the park. Enter the park from Hwy 2 at West Glacier and proceed through the entrance station 2 miles to the visitor center. Logan Pass Visitor Center The Logan Pass Visitor Center sits atop the Continental Divide at 6,646 feet. The visitor center houses exhibits on the plants and animals found in the sub-alpine region of the park. Numerous exhibits outside the visitor center tell the story of geology, climate change, and life in the harsh alpine world above treeline. Logan Pass is perhaps the most crowded location in the park with the parking lot filling to capacity early in the morning. Plan to arrive early or visit later in the afternoon. The Logan Pass Visitor Center sits in the middle of the park at the highest point along the Going-to-the-Sun Road, approximately 32 miles (51.5 km) from the West Entrance and 18 miles from the St. Mary Entrance. St. Mary Visitor Center The St. Mary Visitor Center is located just inside the east entrance of the park near the community of St. Mary, Montana. Rangers are on duty inside to assist with trip planning. A park film is shown throughout the day. Exhibits highlight the rich Native American history associated with Glacier National Park. The St. Mary Visitor Center is reached off of Hwy 89 at the community of St. Mary, Montana. It is approximately 1 mile past the park entrance. Apgar Campground Apgar Campground is the largest campground in the park. It is situated in trees and provides tent and RV campers with shade and some privacy. Evening sunsets on Lake McDonald are only a short stroll, and you won't want to miss evening programs with a ranger at the Apgar Amphitheater. Many trails are located within a short drive of the campground. Advanced reservations are required for all sites. Click the reservation button below for details. Apgar summer status 30.00 Campsite capacity is limited to eight people and two vehicles, where space is available. A maximum of two tents per site is permitted. Apgar primitive status 20.00 Campsite capacity is limited to eight people and two vehicles, where space is available. A maximum of two tents per site is permitted. No potable water sources or dump station facilities are provided during the primitive camping season. Comfort stations are closed; use vault toilets located in the campground. Apgar winter status 0.00 No potable water sources or dump station facilities are provided during the winter season. Sites are free with a valid entrance pass. Apgar Picnic Area shoreline of mountain lake surrounded by forest Shoreline view from picnic area Apgar Amphitheater two aisles run through green benches that point to platform Attend an evening program at Apgar Amphitheater Camping in winter tent and picnic table in snowy forest Apgar is open yearround Avalanche Campground Avalanche Campground in located in one of the most popular sections of Glacier National Park west of the Continental Divide. The campground accommodates tent and RV campers, however only 50 sites will accommodate vehicle lengths up to 26 feet. Bring your hiking boots and binoculars. Two popular day hikes offer spectacular scenery and glimpses of birds and wildlife that inhabit the area. Advanced reservations are required for all sites. Check Recreation.gov for details. Avalanche summer fee 30.00 Avalanche Campground is reservation only. Campsite capacity is limited to eight people and two vehicles, where space is available. A maximum of two tents per site is permitted. Avalanche Campground tent, picnic table, and fire ring in forest site Nestled among western hemlock and western red cedar Avalanche Amphitheater rows of wooden benches on gravel by trees Simple bench seating Bowman Lake Bowman Lake Campground is located in the North Fork area of Glacier National Park approximately 32.5 miles from the west entrance and 30 miles from the Canadian border. The drive to Bowman Lake is a very slow, dusty, and bumpy ride on dirt roads. Trailers are not permitted. The campground is located close to the shore of Bowman Lake and camp sites are within trees for shade and some privacy. Tent campers looking for peace and quiet will enjoy Bowman Lake for its serenity and remote location. Bowman Lake summer status 25.00 Campsite capacity is limited to eight people and two vehicles, where space is available. A maximum of two tents per site is permitted. Bowman Lake primitive status 15.00 Campsite capacity is limited to eight people and two vehicles, where space is available. A maximum of two tents per site is permitted. When campgrounds are open in primitive status there are special considerations regarding water and sanitation. No potable water sources or dump station facilities are provided during the primitive camping season. Bowman Lake clouds, conifer forest and mountains reflected in lake View of Bowman Lake from shoreline near campground Campfire at Bowman Lake Campground A camper wearing a bright hat warms their hands near a campfire in a forest clearing. A camper wearing a bright hat warms their hands while squatting near a campfire in a forest clearing. Cut Bank The Cut Bank Campground is located on the east side of Glacier National Park and provides a sense of peace and quiet that may not be found in larger campgrounds within the park. The campground is accessed by a 5 mile dirt road off of highway 89. The campground is located among trees, providing shade and privacy for tent campers. RVs are not recommended due to the nature of the road and campground layout. Trailheads are near the campground for day hiking use or extended trips in the backcountry. Cut Bank summer fee 20.00 Campsite capacity is limited to eight people and two vehicles, where space is available. A maximum of two tents per site is permitted. Cut Bank is a primitive campground all season. There is no water available and campers are advised to bring their own drinking water. Hiking in Cut Bank Two people walk down a trail near the Cut Bank Campground under cloudy skies with mountains behind. Two people walk down a trail near the Cutbank Campground under cloudy skies. Rocky snow capped peaks rise in the background and the foreground is filled with thick grass. Fish Creek Fish Creek is the second largest campground in the park and is one of the campgrounds in the park that takes reservations. Sites within the campground are surrounded by trees and provide shade and some privacy to both tent and RV campers. Some sites, though not directly on the shore of Lake McDonald, offer filtered views of the lake. Fish Creek summer fee 30.00 Campsite capacity is limited to eight people and two vehicles, where space is available. A maximum of two tents per site is permitted. Fish Creek Amphitheater rows of benches before a stone-based stage with wooden backdrop Enjoy a nightly evening program at the amphitheater Fish Creek Campground Fun Two people sit by a campfire ring in a forested campground with tents and other people in the backgr The Fish Creek Campground is in a forested area. Fish Creek Picnic Area picnic table and fire ring among trees by lake The beach grows beach as the water levels drop through the summer. Kintla Lake Kintla Lake Campground is Glacier National Park's most remote frontcountry and car camping campground. It is located in the uppermost northwest section of the park known as the North Fork, approximately 40 miles from the west entrance. Access is via a rough dirt road. Trailers not permitted. Due to its remote location, the campground is very quiet and rarely fills, offering tent campers a sense of solitude. The campground sits on Kintla Lake. Kintla Lake summer status 25.00 Campsite capacity is limited to eight people and two vehicles, where space is available. A maximum of two tents per site is permitted. A hand pump is available for potable water, and pit toilets are located in the campground as well. Kintla Lake primitive status 15.00 Campsite capacity is limited to eight people and two vehicles, where space is available. A maximum of two tents per site is permitted. Primitive camping is available, depending on weather and road conditions. During primitive camping season there is no water available and campers are advised to bring their own drinking water. Kintla Lake blue sky over mountains, lake, and conifer covered ridge View from shore Dusty Cars at Kintla Campgroung Six dusty cars are parked along side a dirt road with a forest in the background on a sunny day. The road to Kintla Lake is long, rough, and dusty. Logging Creek The Logging Creek Campground is one of the smaller campgrounds in Glacier and is located on the west side of the park, south of Polebridge. Access is via the Inside North Fork Road, a dusty narrow winding road. Caution is advised when traveling this road. RVs and trailers are not permitted. Once there, campers will find a small primitive campground with all the solitude one could want. The trailhead to Logging Lake is nearby and the easy hike to the lake is a great family day hike. Logging Creek summer fee 15.00 Campsite capacity is limited to eight people and two vehicles, where space is available. A maximum of two tents per site is permitted. Logging Creek Campground operates in primitive status all season. No potable water sources or dump station facilities are provided. The North Fork Valley A bridge crosses a river with trees framing the image and distant snowy mountains in the background. The road to Logging Lake. Many Glacier Campground The campground at Many Glacier is one of the most popular campgrounds in Glacier National Park. The campground is situated within trees for tent and RV campers, though there are only 13 sites that can accommodate vehicle lengths up to 35 feet in length. Bring your binoculars, as there are opportunities to view wildlife like bighorn sheep, moose, and bears. Many Glacier also provides access to some of the best day hikes in the park. Advanced reservations are required for all sites. Many Glacier summer status 30.00 Campsite capacity is limited to eight people and two vehicles, where space is available. A maximum of two tents per site is permitted. Many Glacier primitive status 20.00 Campsite capacity is limited to eight people and two vehicles, where space is available. A maximum of two tents per site is permitted. During primitive camping season there is no water available and campers are advised to bring their own drinking water. Many Glacier Campground Amphitheater brown wooden benches on slope in forest clearing Enjoy an evening program at the amphitheater Mount Wilbur craggy topped mountain rises above forest and lakeshore Mount Wilbur towers over the Swiftcurrent area. Many Glacier Campground a tent, picnic table, and fire ring on gravel in clearing, RV in background A wooded site in busy Many Glacier Quartz Creek Quartz Creek Campground is the smallest campground in Glacier National Park and remains in primitive status all season. It is located on the west side of the park in the North Fork area and is accessed by the Inside North Fork Road, a rough, dusty, dirt road with many blind curves and few pullouts. Trailers are not permitted. Tent campers will enjoy a wilderness experience at the campground. Quartz Creek summer fee 15.00 Campsite capacity is limited to eight people and two vehicles, where space is available. A maximum of two tents per site is permitted. No potable water sources or dump station facilities are provided. There are pit toilets. Patrol Cabin small rustic cabin and tent on lakeshore surrounded by tall conifers A backcountry patrol cabin on shore of Quartz Lake Rising Sun Campground Rising Sun Campground is located just west of St. Mary and halfway along St. Mary Lake. Campers at Rising Sun will enjoy beautiful sunrises in the morning with Red Eagle Mountain as a backdrop, and the campground serves as a convenient base camp to many day hikes located east of Logan Pass. Some sites are open, allowing for cool breezes throughout the day, while others are located among trees, accommodating those seeking some shade and privacy. Rising Sun summer fee 30.00 Rising Sun is first come, first serve only. Campsite capacity is limited to eight people and two vehicles, where space is available. A maximum of two tents per site is permitted. Rising Sun Campground Chilling A person sits at a campsite in the Rising Sun Campground, surrounded by dense vegetation. A person sits at a campsite in the Rising Sun Campground, surrounded by dense vegetation. Rising Sun view of mountains and a mix of vegetation Rising Sun views Rising Sun Amphitheater wooden benches on gravel clearing with campsites and bathroom building in background among trees Attend an evening program at the amphitheater Sprague Creek Campground Sprague Creek is a small campground located on the northeast shore of Lake McDonald, just off Going-to-the-Sun Road. Towed units (vehicle plus unit) and RVs exceeding 21 feet are not permitted in this campground. The campground is located within trees, providing shade during warm summers. Some sites near the shore have unobstructed views of Lake McDonald. Reservations are required to camp at Sprague Creek Campground. Click the reservation button below for details. Sprague Creek summer fee 30.00 Campsite capacity is limited to eight people and two vehicles, where space is available. A maximum of two tents per site is permitted. Sprague Creek Picnic Area gravel parking spaces and picnic tables in forest clearing Nestled between Going-to-the-Sun Road and Lake McDonald Sprague Creek Trail to Lake McDonald hard packed trail in woods marked with accessible symbol on sign An accessible trail leads to the lake Sprague Creek Trail to Lake hardpacked gravel pad at forest edge, dark sandy beach at shoreline End of the accessible trail St. Mary Campground St. Mary Campground is the largest campground on the east side of Glacier National Park and is open year-round. Activities such as interpretive programs, book sales, and shuttle service tours are located at the nearby St. Mary Visitor Center. St. Mary is one of the campgrounds in the park that take reservations for part of the summer. Though shade may be sparse, aspen trees grace St. Mary Campground with soothing sounds from spring and summer breezes, and colorful splashes of yellow late in the season. St. Mary primitive status 20.00 Campsite capacity is limited to eight people and two vehicles, where space is available. A maximum of two tents per site is permitted. Sites are available on a first-come, first-serve basis. St. Mary summer status 30.00 Campsite capacity is limited to eight people and two vehicles, where space is available. A maximum of two tents per site is permitted. Sites can be reserved mid-May through mid-August. Individual campsites may be reserved up to 6 months in advance. The two group sites can be reserved up to a year in advance. St. Mary winter status 0.00 Campsite capacity is limited to eight people and two vehicles, where space is available. A maximum of two tents per site is permitted. No potable water sources or dump station facilities are provided during the primitive camping season. Comfort stations are closed; use vault toilets located in the campground. Rainy Evening in St. Mary A park ranger in uniform stands in front of a crowd and gestures with their hands. A park ranger in uniform stands in front of a crowd and gestures with their hands while giving an evening program to a group of park visitors. A rainbow is faintly visible in the background. Evening Program in St. Mary Campground A park ranger points while talking to a crowd of visitors in the St. Mary Campground. A park ranger points while talking to a crowd of visitors in the St. Mary Campground. Tents and cars are blurry in the background and park visitors are in the foreground. Stormy Night dark cloudy sky over campsite in field with tent, picnic tables, and campers wearing headlamps Under the Big Sky at St. Mary Campground Two Medicine Campground Two Medicine is approximately 13 miles from East Glacier. Sites within the campground at are generally shaded by trees, and offer some privacy from other campers. Boat tours and Red Bus tours can be found at Two Medicine. There are numerous day hiking opportunities available, including a handicap accessible trail to Running Eagle Falls. The campground remains open in late-September for primitive camping with no running water or flush toilets. Advanced reservations are required for all sites. Two Medicine summer status 30.00 Campsite capacity is limited to eight people and two vehicles, where space is available. A maximum of two tents per site is permitted. Two Medicine primitive status 20.00 Campsite capacity is limited to eight people and two vehicles, where space is available. A maximum of two tents per site is permitted. No potable water sources or dump station facilities are provided. Comfort stations are closed; use vault toilets located in the campground. Pray Lake man stands in shallow water of small lake at base of mountain Two Medicine campground wraps partly around Pray Lake Two Medicine Amphitheater long wooden benches in gravel clearing with picnic table and food storage box in background Attend an evening program at Two Medicine Campground Amphitheater Glacier Lilies near Logan Pass Large mountains dotted with snow loom above a rocky meadow filled with yellow flowers. Glacier lilies dot the landscape off the Highline Trail. St. Mary Falls A double waterfall blurs over layered rocks. Glacier National Park is sculpted by water. Lobby of the Lake McDonald Lodge Looking down into the lobby of the Lake McDonald Lodge from the balcony Lobby of the historic Lake McDonald Lodge Alpine Sunset Clouds of orange and red sit above dark-gray mountains; snow dots the mountain peaks. Majestic Heavens Peak is easily viewed from the Going-to-the-Sun Road. Swiftcurrent Fire Lookout A small, brown and white structure sits on a rocky top with mountain peaks in the distance. The historic Swiftcurrent Lookout was built in a Swiss chalet architectural style. East Side Sunset Jagged peaks rise out of a forested valley and an empty road curves off into the distance. Going-to-the-Sun Road in the St. Mary Valley Glacier's Night Sky Silhouetted mountains and flowers against a night sky filled with stars and a milky band of light. Glacier's dark sky is important to wildlife and people. From Alpine to Aquifer: Stoneflies in Strange Places Discover the unique and fascinating research centered on aquatic invertebrates found in the alpine and in the Nyack floodplain aquifer. Explore how the presence of these creatures adds to the biodiversity of the Crown of the Continent Ecosystem and learn about threats that face them. A group of students watch as researchers pump water into a long, mesh net. Pikas Resource Brief Pikas are small animals that face a big threat. Suited for life in cold climates, their habitat is shrinking as the world’s average temperature increases and tree line encroaches upon the alpine and subalpine talus slopes and meadows where pikas roam. Researchers and citizen scientists identify and monitor pika populations in Glacier to determine current distribution and any changes that occur in that distribution. Round potato-sized rodent sits on rock Fire and Invasive Weeds Resource Brief The natural cycle of a forest involves fire and subsequent revegetation. A newly burned area is great for new plant growth, but is also susceptible to noxious weed infestation. Invasive weeds can outcompete native plants and ruin biodiversity. Care must be taken by firefighters managing the blaze and those monitoring fire effects so invasive seeds do not take hold. Yellow headed flowers blanket ground below burnt trees Common Loon Resource Brief The common loon is listed as a Species of Concern in Montana. Glacier National Park harbors an estimated 20% of the state's breeding population. For over a decade, Glacier researchers and citizen scientists have conducted surveys on key park lakes during breeding season, part of a statewide effort to monitor and manage risks to common loon populations. Common loon extends its wings showcasing white spots on black feathers Wildland Fire History — Fire in Glacier! Glacier NP interpreter recounts a brief history of wildfire in the park, then details the Red Bench fire of Sept. 1988. Because of the concurrent historic fires in Yellowstone, public interest in the fire was higher than normal. Author discusses education and outreach in the fire’s wake. Original article published in 1989. Connecting with Our Homelands in 2019 Throughout the 2019 academic year, Hopa Mountain, in partnership with the National Park Service, awarded Connecting with our Homelands travel grants to 21 different indigenous organizations, schools, and nonprofits. These are glimpses into some of these trips. Students look at a forested landscape. National Park Service Visitor and Resource Protection Staff Focuses on Week of Leadership Staff from all levels of the National Park Service in law enforcement, United States Park Police, as well as fire and aviation spent a week learning leadership lessons from one another as well as from a diverse group of leaders during the last week of September 2019. A group of women and men on a rocky outcrop in high desert. Cleaner Snow Reveals Cleaner Air in Rocky Mountain Network Parks Few things look more pristine than a fresh blanket of snow, yet each snowflake naturally carries small particles from the atmosphere. When snowflakes build around these particles, the resulting snowfall can bring pollutants from far away into our national parks. Long-term snow chemistry monitoring is showing some improvements in air quality at Glacier and Rocky Mountain National Parks, and Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve. Snowpack Sampling at Apgar Lookout in Glacier National Park 2019 Connecting with our Homelands Awardees Hopa Mountain, in partnership with the National Park Service, is pleased to announce the 2019 awardees of the Connecting with our Homelands travel grants. Twenty-one Indigenous organizations, schools, and nonprofits have been awarded travel funds for trips to national park units across 12 states/territories within the United States. An elder and young student talk while sitting on a rock. Destruction & Discovery: Exploring fire's impacts on Glacier's historic landscapes Fire is a frequent visitor to western Montana's landscape. And, although fire's effects on natural resources is a story often told, it's impacts on cultural resources is less so. This article highlights a newly created story map that explores fire's impact on cultural resources within Glacier National Park. Smoke billows up from a forested landscape. Dead, standing trees stand in the foreground. A Botanist's Dream This multi-media article highlights two, long-term, seasonal botanists at Glacier National Park and their monitoring efforts in Glacier's grasslands. Researcher crouches down in a meadow filled with wildflowers. Wildlife Shepherding in Glacier National Park In July 2016, Glacier National Park became the first National Park Service unit to use an employee-owned dog to help manage habituated wildlife. Resource manager Mark Biel uses his professionally trained border collie, Gracie, to move bighorn sheep and mountain goats out of areas of high visitor use, such as the Logan Pass parking lot. “Ranger Mark” and Gracie are also wildlife-safety ambassadors, helping remind people to stay a safe distance from all wildlife. Working dog looks over her shoulder at handler as bighorn rams graze below. Glacier's Avalanche Cycles: Past, Present, and Future USGS physical scientist Erich Peitzsch uses tree cross-sections and cores to establish a timeline of past avalanche activity. By looking at avalanche cycles over the past 100-200 years, Peitzsch hopes to learn whether or not climate change will affect avalanche behavior in the future. A cloud of snow and debris rises from an avalanche ripping down the mountainside. Army Couple Visits 59 National Parks When you’re a dual-military couple, it can be a challenge to try to find things to do together, especially when you’re at separate duty stations or on deployment. For one Army couple, what started out as a simple idea to get out of the house turned into a five-year adventure. Couple standing in front of The Windows at Arches National Park. Wildland Fire Ecology Resource Brief While often seen as devastating, wildland fires are an essential part of the natural cycle of forests and grasslands. Fires clear vegetation and fuel, providing new habitat and nutrients that aid biodiversity. Glacier National Park hosts multiple, healthy fire regimes. Fire managers maintain that success by allowing natural fires to burn within parameters and even occasionally setting prescribed burns. Conifers engulfed in flames Whitebark Pine Resource Brief Whitebark pine curls and twists in its slow growth in the upper subalpine. This invaluable keystone species is in severe decline due to blister rust, fire exclusion, and mountain pine beetle. Scientists agree active restoration efforts are needed and the park is working with other land management partners to plant and monitor seedlings. Dead, silvery tree with gnarled limbs stands alone PARKS...IN...SPAAAACE!!! NASA astronauts have quite literally an out-of-this-world view of national parks and take some pretty stellar pictures to share. Travel along with the space station on its journey west to east getting the extreme bird’s eye view of national parks across the country. And one more down-to-earth. View of Denali National Park & Preserve from space Ice Patch Archeology Resource Brief Buried in Glacier's melting ice are archeological and paleontological materials encased hundreds, or even thousands of years ago. A recent five-year collaborative research project investigated 46 ice patches in the park, taking core samples, documenting melting, and collecting remains of ancient plants and animals, including bison. Two men use hand-auger to drill into steep snowfield Citizen Science Program Celebrates Year of the Bird Glacier's Citizen Science Program took part in celebrating the "Year of the Bird" by hosting a variety of events. From a spring bird survey and Year of the Bird celebration to an Alpine Bird BioBlitz, the program worked hard to educate park visitors about the value of birds as well as current threats to some of Glacier's bird species. Sunlight bounces off the underside of a golden eagle in flight. Mountaintops fill the background. Bears, Berries, and Bees: The Implications of Changing Phenology Explore current research on huckleberry plant production in Glacier National Park and how scientists are researching berries to discover how changes in phenology, or the seasonal timing of plants, might impact bear behavior. The goal of the project is to develop a model that will combine phenology information with other factors such as temperature, snow pack, and rainfall, to predict berry production across the park. Huckleberries ripening on a huckleberry plant. Fire Communication and Education Grants Enhance Fire Interpretation and Outreach in the National Parks in 2015 and Beyond The 2015 National Park Service Fire Communication and Education Grant Program provided funding for projects, programs, or tasks in twelve parks around the country. A woman studies a small coniferous tree while a younger woman looks on. Bison Bellows: Recent Evidence of Bison at Glacier National Park A recent fire in Glacier National Park uncovered a bison skull and whole lot of history! Skull with horns laying in the dirt, next to a shovel Glacier's bat inventory and monitoring program: Using partners, collaborators, and volunteers to make it a success Park biologists race the clock to learn as much as they can about bats before risks from white-nose syndrome and wind energy development alter bat populations and movements in and around Glacier National Park. little brown bat, Glacier National Park; copyright Kristi DuBois Wildland Fire: Collaboration Key During Grant Kohrs July 4 Fire Brad Harris, Glacier’s fire management specialist-fuels, was returning from a fire in Colorado on July 1, when a passing train ignited two small fires in and near Grant Kohrs Ranch NHS. Harris stopped at GRKO to make sure the fire’s documentation was complete, inventory the cache, work on the pump and pump trailer, and conduct structure assessments. Harris responded as incident commander when a passing train ignited six fires in the park on July 4. burned area of a wildland fire with a train track Wildland Fire: Montana Conservation Corps Completes Fuels Projects A Montana Conservation Corps crew, funded by the Glacier National Park Conservancy, dedicated 10 days to working on fuels projects at Glacier National Park in late June through early July 2013. Working on four remote and front-country projects, they completed 10 acres of wildland-urban interface mitigation work at very little cost to the park, helping to build fire-adapted communities. Interview with a Ranger Explore the variety of experiences and adventures of this seasonal park ranger who has worked in Glacier National Park for 38 seasons. Find out what he enjoys most about his job and why he keeps coming back. Ranger stands next to a horse, smiling for the camera. The Stromatolites of Glacier National Park The rugged high peaks of Glacier National Park are a beautiful sight to behold, with people traveling from all around the globe to experience this iconic place. The rocks that compose those amazing peaks and valley walls hold the secrets to a time when this land was once covered by a vast shallow sea, a billion and a half years ago. Siyeh Formation bioherm located along the Highline Trail Park Air Profiles - Glacier National Park Air quality profile for Glacier National Park. Gives park-specific information about air quality and air pollution impacts for Glacier NP as well as the studies and monitoring conducted for Glacier NP. Red Eagle Mountain Saving Bull Trout Bull trout are the top native predators of the upper Columbia River system, of which Glacier National Park's western slopes reside in. But bull trout are faced with a slew of challenges, including competition from invasive lake trout. Discover how fisheries managers in Glacier are tackling these challenges and making efforts to save some of the last viable bull trout populations and habitat in the Northwest. Juvenile bull trout swims through the water. Waterton-Glacier BioBlitz! A Fun-filled Day of Hands-on-Science During the summer of 2017, the CCRLC hosted two BioBlitz events: the Waterton-Glacier Mushroom BioBlitz and the Waterton-Glacier Butterfly BioBlitz. Nearly 150 participants joined in helping resource managers gather data on the diverse array of fungus and butterfly species found in Glacier National Park. A butterfly rests on a pencil that a citizen scientist is using to record butterfly species. Unsure Footing - Glacier’s Habituated Mountain Goats This article highlights a recent research project that studied human-wildlife interactions occurring at Glacier National Park's popular Logan Pass. The study looked at habituated mountain goats at Logan Pass and compared their behavior to that of more "wild" goats in other areas of the park. The goal of the project is to determine how people alter mountain goat behavior and offer strategies to minimize human-wildlife interaction. Mountain goat in a rocky, snowy landscape Aquatic Invasive Species Hot Topic The introduction of non-native species results in an ecological struggle to maintain balance. Unequipped to compete with invasives, native species populations decline. Many of Glacier’s aquatic ecosystems have been impacted by the invasion of non-native fish species, such as lake trout. There is also the looming threat of exotic plants and mussels. The park answers these threats with education, fishing and boating regulations, and experimental restoration projects. Pile of mollusks with striped shells Invasive Plants Resource Brief Invasive weeds pose a real threat to the park ecosystem. Invasives outcompete native plants and alter wildlife habitat. Glacier uses multiple methods and treatments to minimize the impact of invasive plants. Resource managers work with park staff and volunteers to detect new, invasive plant species in hopes of catching infestations early. An annual Noxious Weed Blitz is held to educate participants on noxious weeds and to pull invasives on key trails. Toadflax with green stalks and long yellow flowers Saving Glacier's Native Fish Hot Topic Bull trout and other native fish species are under siege. Non-native fish were introduced to the region in the first half of the 1900s. Those fish, especially lake trout, outcompete and prey upon bull trout. Glacier’s fishing and boating regulations, along with joint-agency restoration projects at key lakes, take aim at non-native species in an attempt to restore natural integrity to park waters. Hand releasing speckled bull trout into clear water Forest Health Hot Topic Glacier's forests see continual change, but some recent changes are cause for concern among visitors and researchers. Natural factors, like drought, are compounded by rising temperatures and forest pathogens, affecting tree health and resulting in swaths of sickly or dead trees. As the climate warms, we continue to analyze and assess the cumulative impacts to our forests. Researcher climbs pine to protect cones Monitoring Amphibians in Glacier Amphibians are excellent ecological indicators due to high sensitivity to slight changes in their environment. Worldwide declines in amphibian populations prompted the U.S. Geological Survey to begin a national effort to document trends of amphibian populations on federal lands. Research on amphibians in Glacier, particularly boreal toads, began in 2000. Researchers are documenting changes to population size, survival rates, and occupancy of suitable habitat. A boreal toad sits on a piece of wood. Mountain Goat Resource Brief Mountain goats are one of Glacier National Park's iconic species, yet little is known about their population size and distribution. To monitor the goat population and detect any changes in overall population, park managers and researchers use ground surveys conducted by citizen scientists and studies from individual collared goats. Mountain goat looks down from a cliff. Wildland Fire in Douglas Fir: Western United States Douglas fir is widely distributed throughout the western United States, as well as southern British Columbia and northern Mexico. Douglas fir is able to survive without fire, its abundantly-produced seeds are lightweight and winged, allowing the wind to carry them to new locations where seedlings can be established. Close-up of Douglas fir bark and needles. A Time for Reflection Read the value of citizen science to staff member Erik Nelson as he describes his summer working as the Loon Coordinator at the Crown of the Continent Research Learning Center. Close-up shot of Erik Nelson wearing a red bandanna and an expedition hat. Northern Hawk Owl Resource Brief Though widely distributed throughout Alaska and Canada, little is known about northern hawk owls in Montana. Researchers consistently document breeding northern hawk owls in Glacier National Park, probably because it allows recently burned forests to rebound naturally, offering such fire-associated bird species ideal territory. More monitoring is needed to learn about this owl's life cycle, population size, and possible threats due to climate change's impact on fire regime. Northern hawk owl perched in front of burnt tree showing white breast with thick brown stripes Fire-Fueled Finds In 2015, the Reynolds Creek Fire burned the forests along the Going-to-the-Sun Road (GTSR) in the St. Mary Valley. Although some historic structures were known, the fire revealed new archeological sites that gave insight into where and how the workers who built the GTSR lived. In addition, archeologists uncovered artifacts at an old trapper cabin and in and around the Baring Creek Cabin, a historic backcountry patrol cabin still used by park staff. Rusted, old pans and utensils, broken plates, and a rusted, metal cheese grater lie in a pile. BioBlitzes: Celebrating Biodiversity in the NPS Centennial Year A rich array of species reside within our national parks. To engage visitors of all ages to discover and document biodiversity within parks and to celebrate the NPS Centennial, bioblitz events were held across the country during 2016. At Glacier, the Crown of the Continent Research Learning Center (CCRLC) hosted multiple BioBlitz events, engaging students and adults in hands-on science! Two students, dressed in waders, stand in lake holding dip nets. Interagency Cooperation Leads to Big Prairie Prescribed Fire Success Glacier National Park fire management teamed up with firefighters from the neighboring Flathead National Forest to conduct an important burn to restore the landscape of Big Prairie in April 2013 on the west side of the park. Because the burn was conducted in April, one fire seasonal employee was available, so they relied heavily on firefighters from Flathead NF to augment permanent fire staff. The fire helped to maintain and restore resilient landscapes. The Survey123 App: Enhancing the Citizen Science Experience The Common Loon Citizen Science project has used citizen scientist volunteers to record data on loon numbers, nesting success, and habitat since its creation in 2005. All of that data was recorded on a paper data sheet, but in 2019 citizen scientists can now submit their survey via a new app in Survey123! Learn about the new app and how it will benefit the program. Close-up of person holding a survey form and a cell phone. Bewitched by Bats from an Early Age This article relays a special bond that forms between a bat researcher and a young girl during a late night field trip highlighting bat research and monitoring. Learn about bat research in Glacier National Park and the threats bats face while learning about a special young girl whose fascination with bats equals that of the bat researchers themselves. Researcher examines bat while two children look on. 2003 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2003 Environmental Achievement Awards Checking Glacier's Vital Signs In 2007, the Rocky Mountain Inventory and Monitoring Network—a small team of NPS scientists—began monitoring natural resources, called “vital signs,” in Glacier and nearby parks. Vital signs indicate park health and serve as red flags if conditions deteriorate. Results from monitoring these vital signs support park managers’ efforts to make science-based management decisions. Learn about the NPS Inventory and Monitoring Program and its work in Glacier National Park. high-elevation stream running across rocky ground with mountains in the background Citizen Science Opportunities Associated with Panoramic Lookout Photographs Anyone can participate in citizen science. You can go to a national park lookout point and take panoramic lookout photos and upload them to a national database. Links are provided to Gigapan tutorials and a citizen science weed project in Glacier National Park. Information about how to set up a photo point in your backyard is also shared. Wildland Fire in Ponderosa Pine: Western United States This forest community generally exists in areas with annual rainfall of 25 inches or less. Extensive pure stands of this forest type are found in the southwestern U.S., central Washington and Oregon, southern Idaho and the Black Hills of South Dakota. Recently burned ponderosa pine forest. History of the Panoramic Lookout Project Most documentation of the panoramic lookout photos project, which began about 1930 to document areas seen from the lookout system, comes from the US Forest Service. The NPS project began in 1934. Lester Moe worked for the Forest Service taking photos in 1933 and 1934, and later worked for NPS. Several innovations came about from this project: the Osborne photo-recording transit and “special emulsion infra-red sensitive film” not affected by smoke and haze. sample of the panoramic lookout project Walking in the Steps of History: Retaking Panoramic Lookout Photographs Ian Grob, of the US Forest Service, collaborated with the NPS to retake panoramic lookout images ¾ of a century after the originals were taken. This page tells the story of how he came to be involved and summarizes the processes his team used and the trials and tribulations they faced in retaking the photos. Ian Grob adjusts an Osborne photo recording transit looking out over mountain and valley Glacier National Park Welcomes New Fire Management Officer Jeremy Harker, Glacier National Park Fire Management Officer Jeremy Harker, Glacier National Park Fire Management Officer Going-to-the-Sun Road Historic District Cultural Landscape Going-to-the-Sun Road winds its way east to west through the heart of Glacier National Park, allowing visitors to experience (through driving) the mountains, hanging valleys, rock walls, and glaciers that make up the northern Rocky Mountains. The road is nationally significant for its design and monumental engineering accomplishments. It is designated as a National Historical Civil Engineering Landmark and a National Historic Landmark. Going-to-the-Sun Road (Tim Rains, NPS) Interactions underfoot: The subtle influence of soil moisture on vegetation pattern Second in a series of three "In Focus" articles that share insights into the near-universal and far-reaching effects of soils on the ecology, management, and enjoyment of our national parks. Monthly water use by plants at Glacier National Park relative to soils with and without volcanic ash Glacier National Park's New Sister Glacier National Park recently signed a Sister Park arrangement with Gorkhi-Terelj National Park, Mongolia. The two parks are located at the same latitude and have similar landforms. They hope to begin working with each soon. A green valley bordered by mountain ridges in Gorkhi-Terelj National Park. Youth Climate Change Ambassadors Conduct Citizen Science In 2010 high school students from San Diego learned about climate change in Glacier National Park as they met with climate change researchers, surveyed mountain goats, and—for some—saw snow for the first time. Group of students looking through binoculars Climate Change Teacher Workshop Teachers from across the nation come to Glacier National Park to learn about climate change. Teachers learn about avalanches Bats Resource Brief Until recently, little information has existed about bat populations in Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park. But recent research is determining presence, hibernation locations, and types of species that make their home here. Using acoustical surveys and mist nets to capture bats, three new species of bats have been identified, making a total of nine bat species now known in Glacier National Park. Close up of hoary bat's grimacing face showing row of teeth Harlequin Ducks Resource Brief A favorite of birders, colorful harlequin ducks breed and raise their chicks in Glacier National Park's clear, fast-moving streams. Listed as a species of concern in Montana, harlequins are facing threats from climate change, habitat loss, and human disturbance. Although the harlequin population in Glacier remains stable, these birds are declining throughout the West. Park biologists are monitoring the ducks and collaborating with harlequin researchers throughout the region. A male harlequin stands on a rock located in the middle of a rushing stream. Night Skies Resource Brief Human development and the use of artificial light at night have significantly altered the darkness of night skies, affecting the natural rhythms of life on earth. Low levels of light pollution in Glacier allow visitors to experience spectacular views of the night skies. In 2017, Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park received provisional status as an International Dark Sky Park through the International Dark Sky Association. A hiker standing on rocks is silhouetted in black while looking up at the Milky Way at night Turning Obstacles into Opportunities During their junior year, students from Worcester Polytechnic Institute complete research projects for a variety of organizations. These research projects are an interdisciplinary, immersive team experience that usually take place off campus. In 2018, Glacier National Park was added to the list of project centers. Students work with park leadership on identified research projects. From mobile apps to solar webcams, students generate solutions that help park management. WPI students pose for the camera in front of Lake McDonald. Citizen Science Persists in the Face of COVID-19 2020 brought a summer season like no other, but Glacier's Citizen Science Program met challenges from COVID-19 and succeeded in its efforts to collect necessary data. By using a small, previously trained volunteer force and park staff, the program accomplished its goal of reaching every mountain goat and common loon site this summer. Additionally, citizen scientists and staff participated in the Hawk Watch Citizen Science Project this fall, counting migrating raptors. A man looks through a scope while sitting on top of a mountain. STEAM Camp for Girls! Despite the challenges of COVID-19, 2020 brought the first STEAM Camp for girls to Glacier National Park! Middle school girls from the surrounding area learned about Northwest Montana's changing landscapes using science, technology, engineering, art, and math. Two girls hold a poster entitled, North Fork Homesteads Resource Brief With the completion of the railway in 1893 and a 40-mile wagon road to Kintla in 1901, homesteading in the North Fork Valley flourished in the early 1900s. In 1910, Glacier National Park was established with the North Fork area within its boundaries. Some years of contention followed as park conservation policies stifled private development. The history of these intrepid pioneers remains alive today as the park preserves multiple homestead sites. Historic photo of family of five plus a deer standing outside log cabin Series: Panoramic Project Shows How National Parks Change Over Time In the 1930s, panoramic photographs were taken from lookout points. Comparing these images to present-day photographs allows us to understand change over time. Viewing photographs of different eras in the national parks can give many insights on ecosystem processes, as well as simply change over time. The panoramic lookout photographs provide a window on the past and an opportunity to compare to the present with changes to landforms and land cover. Lester Moe documenting park landscapes in the 1930s Series: Climate Change in Nth California and Sth Oregon Discover how climate change is impacting national parks sites as varied as volcanoes, caves, coastline and deserts. Klamath River enters the ocean Series: NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Since 2002, the National Park Service (NPS) has awarded Environmental Achievement (EA) Awards to recognize staff and partners in the area of environmental preservation, protection and stewardship. A vehicle charges at an Electric Vehicle charging station at Thomas Edison National Historical Park Series: Park Paleontology News - Vol. 10, No. 2, Fall 2018 All across the park system, scientists, rangers, and interpreters are engaged in the important work of studying, protecting, and sharing our rich fossil heritage. <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/newsletters.htm">Park Paleontology news</a> provides a close up look at the important work of caring for these irreplaceable resources. <ul><li>Contribute to Park Paleontology News by contacting the <a href="https://www.nps.gov/common/utilities/sendmail/sendemail.cfm?o=5D8CD5B898DDBB8387BA1DBBFD02A8AE4FBD489F4FF88B9049&r=/subjects/geoscientistsinparks/photo-galleries.htm">newsletter editor</a></li><li>Learn more about <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/">Fossils & Paleontology</a> </li><li>Celebrate <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossilday/">National Fossil Day</a> with events across the nation</li></ul> NPS staff work to document a recently discovered slab of Navajo Sandstone Series: Park Air Profiles Clean air matters for national parks around the country. Photo of clouds above the Grand Canyon, AZ NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Glacier National Park, Montana Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. mountain cliffs The Precambrian The Precambrian was the "Age of Early Life." During the Precambrian, continents formed and our modern atmosphere developed, while early life evolved and flourished. Soft-bodied creatures like worms and jellyfish lived in the world's oceans, but the land remained barren. Common Precambrian fossils include stromatolites and similar structures, which are traces of mats of algae-like microorganisms, and microfossils of other microorganisms. fossil stromatolites in a cliff face Proterozoic Eon—2.5 Billion to 541 MYA The Proterozoic Eon is the most recent division of the Precambrian. It is also the longest geologic eon, beginning 2.5 billion years ago and ending 541 million years ago fossil stromatolites in a cliff face Wildland Fire in Lodgepole Pine The bark of lodgepoles is thin, which does not protect the trunks from scorching by fire. They die easily when a fire passes through. However, the serotinous cones give lodgepole pine a special advantage for spreading seeds for the next generation. Close-up of the needles of a lodgepole pine. More Than “Just” A Secretary If you’re only familiar with modern office practices, you may not recognize many of jobs necessary to run an office or national park over much of the past hundred years. Today, typewriters have given way to computers, photocopy machines have replaced typing pools, stenographers are rarely seen outside of courtrooms, and callers are largely expected to pick extensions from digital directories. Women skiing Two for the Price of One Companion, assistant, confidant, ambassador, host, nurse, cook, secretary, editor, field technician, wildlife wrangler, diplomat, and social director are some of the many roles that people who marry into the NPS perform in support of their spouses and the NPS mission. Although the wives and daughters of park rangers were some of the earliest women rangers in the NPS, many more women served as “park wives” in the 1920s–1940s. Three members of a family Did You Know We Never Hire Women? In 1920, as Ranger Isabel Bassett Wasson arrived at Yellowstone, Dr. Harold C. Bryant and Dr. Loye Holmes Miller launched the new NPS education program with the Free Nature Guide Service at Yosemite National Park. Female Ranger talks to a crowd The Job is His, Not Yours In the early 1950s, park wives continued to function as they had from the 1920s to the 1940s. The NPS still got Two For the Price of One, relying on women to keep monuments in the Southwest running, to give freely of their time and talents, to build and maintain park communities, and to boost morale among park staffs. With the creation of the Mission 66 Program to improve park facilities, the NPS found new ways to put some park wives to (unpaid) work. Man and woman with telescope “A New Attraction” States licensed women hunting and fishing guides as early as the 1890s, but in national parks the emphasis was on nature study and tours for visitors. It’s commonly thought that Rocky Mountain National Park was the first park to license women guides in 1917, but there was at least one licensed woman guide working at Glacier National Park four years earlier. Collage of newspaper photographs featuring portraits of women Pika Poop Patrol: Collecting Scat for Science Glacier's Citizen Science Program hosted its annual Volunteer Day in August 2021. Participants took to the talus slopes and searched for pika poop, or scat. The collected scat will be analyzed for its DNA to see how pika's are related to one another. This information helps researchers determine how pika populations are connected and what corridors are critical to their success. A small, brown and gray, potato-sized critter holds a large bundle of vegetation in its mouth. Midnight Banders The Crown of the Continent Research Learning Center's Citizen Science Program works with partners in the Common Loon Working Group to band Common Loons in Northwest Montana, including Glacier National Park. Leg banding helps biologist to better understand the status of loons in Montana. This article and video document the nighttime banding process. A pair of loons swim through the water. Glacier's Going-to-the-Sun Road: Managing for the Future As with many of the country’s larger, popular national parks, Glacier National Park's surge in visitation has led to the need for plans and programs to manage visitor use. In 2021, the park implemented a ticketed entry system to reduce congestion and prevent gridlock along the Going-to-the-Sun Road. This article highlights the data and steps used to create and track Glacier's pilot ticketed entry system. A line of cars sit in front of a ticketed entry electronic traffic sign. Changing Patterns of Water Availability May Change Vegetation Composition in US National Parks Across the US, changes in water availability are altering which plants grow where. These changes are evident at a broad scale. But not all areas experience the same climate in the same way, even within the boundaries of a single national park. A new dataset gives park managers a valuable tool for understanding why vegetation has changed and how it might change in the future under different climate-change scenarios. Green, orange, and dead grey junipers in red soil, mountains in background Isabel Bassett Wasson In 1920, Isabel Bassett Wasson was the first woman hired as a park ranger at Yellowstone National Park. Although she only worked for one summer, she opened the door for other women rangers to follow at Yellowstone in the 1920s. Isabel Wasson wearing a short-sleeved shirt poses with trees in the background. Ranger Roll Call, 1916-1929 Recent research demonstrates that there were more women rangers and ranger-naturalists in early National Park Service (NPS) history than previously thought. However, the number of women in uniformed positions was quite low in any given year. Ranger Frieda Nelson shows of the suspenders used to hold up her uniform breeches. Women in Landscape-Scale Conservation: Mary Riddle Before retiring in 2021, Mary Riddle spent much of her career working in Glacier National Park, which is the first international peace park with Waterton Lakes National Park in Canada. woman sits with her back to the camera writing in a field book at the top of a mountain. Ranger Roll Call, 1940-1949 Only a small number of women held temporary ranger positions in national parks during World War II. Carlsbad Caverns National Park, national monuments in the Southwest, and historical sites in the East continued to employ more women. Although a few women veterans benefitted from post-war veteran hiring programs, most veterans were men and permanent positions became even more difficult for women to get. Catherine Byrnes and Barbara Dickinson stand outside modeling the NPS uniform. How an Insect Became a National Park Service Superhero Through the power of partnerships, the Dragonfly Mercury Project elevated the importance of a commonly found insect. It also showed that citizen science can be a potent research tool. A group of young people surround a man in an NPS uniform holding a net next to a stream Pollinators in peril? A multipark approach to evaluating bee communities in habitats vulnerable to effects from climate change Can you name five bees in your park? Ten? Twenty? Will they all be there 50 years from now? We know that pollinators are key to maintaining healthy ecosystems—from managed almond orchards to wild mountain meadows. We have heard about dramatic population declines of the agricultural workhorse, the honey bee. Yet what do we really know about the remarkable diversity and resilience of native bees in our national parks? Southeastern polyester bee, Colletes titusensis. Resist-Accept-Direct (RAD) Case Studies Click the link above to read some in-depth examples of national parks choosing to resist, accept, and direct change. Blue butterfly with white wing tips perched on small white flowers Studying the Past and Predicting the Future Using Rat Nests In the western United States, packrat middens are one of the best tools for reconstructing recent environments and climates. These accumulations of plant fragments, small vertebrate remains, rodent droppings, and other fossils can be preserved for more than 50,000 years. Packrat middens have been found in at least 41 National Park Service units. Photo of a wood rat. Series: Park Paleontology News - Vol. 14, No. 2, Fall 2022 All across the park system, scientists, rangers, and interpreters are engaged in the important work of studying, protecting, and sharing our rich fossil heritage. <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/newsletters.htm">Park Paleontology news</a> provides a close up look at the important work of caring for these irreplaceable resources. <ul><li>Contribute to Park Paleontology News by contacting the <a href="https://www.nps.gov/common/utilities/sendmail/sendemail.cfm?o=5D8CD5B898DDBB8387BA1DBBFD02A8AE4FBD489F4FF88B9049&r=/subjects/geoscientistsinparks/photo-galleries.htm">newsletter editor</a></li><li>Learn more about <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/">Fossils & Paleontology</a> </li><li>Celebrate <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossilday/">National Fossil Day</a> with events across the nation</li></ul> Photo of a person sitting while using a laboratory microscope. You Go SciGirls! Nine budding scientists (ages 8-13) from the Blackfeet community participated in Citizen Science by monitoring Common Loons. The participants learned the role of the loon and other animals in Blackfeet culture providing the girls with a foundation of Traditional Ecological Knowledge. The girls heard from three female NPS biologists and three Blackfeet women in science career fields. The event also gave the girls the opportunity to observe loons and present what they learned. Nine young girls and four women (one in NPS uniform) stand in front of a light blue lake. A “New” First Permanent Woman Ranger For almost a century Marguerite Lindsley (later Arnold) was believed to be the first permanent woman park ranger, appointed to the position at Yellowstone National Park on December 28, 1925. In fact, Mary J. Sullivan held a permanent ranger position at Glacier National Park more than year earlier. Mary Sullivan standing outside wearing a coat with broad lapels and a beret. Pellet Like it is: Getting to Know Glacier's Goats Mountain goats are an iconic species of Glacier National Park’s rugged alpine ecosystem. Recent analysis of citizen science mountain goat trend monitoring data collected between 2008-2019 revealed a population decline of at least 30%. To gather more information on Glacier's mountain goat population, citizen scientists, park biologists, and collaborators from the USGS launched a study to collect mountain goat pellets from Glacier’s goat habitats. A mountain goat stands in a field. Water Quality Resource Brief The waters of Glacier National Park are made up of 762 lakes (amounting to 25,622 acres) and 563 streams, which traverse a total of 2,865 miles. Monitoring the quality of water in the park helps managers to have a better understanding of what changes and processes affect its quality downstream. Glacier’s waters are vulnerable to impacts from recreational activities, mining, and development. The park is taking action to protect the natural integrity of this vital watershed. A waterfall surrounded by mountains flows into a blue lake. Uncovering Ungulates: The Search for Bison in Glacier Bison once roamed the landscape in and around Glacier National Park. The rumble of their stampeding hooves has been silenced in the park since the 1800s. Park archeologists are working to uncover evidence of their use patterns by testing their remains for information on their age and diet. The research presents a unique opportunity to learn how bison may have used mountainous areas. A close-up of photo of a bison's face. Partnership Highlight | Montana Conservation Corps participate in the Dragonfly Mercury Project Spend a day in Glacier National Park with the Montana Conservation Corps. Discover what it's like to collect dragonfly larvae for this nationwide study through the eyes of youth volunteers. Two Montana Conservation Corps member kneel down to look at a tub of aquatic insects. Taking the Pulse of U.S. National Parks How do we know if parks are healthy? We measure their vital signs, of course! Across the country, there are 32 inventory and monitoring networks that measure the status and trends of all kinds of park resources. We're learning a lot after years of collecting data. Check out these articles written for kids and reviewed by kids in partnership with the international online journal Frontiers for Young Minds. A cartoon of a ranger taking the pulse of the Earth. Series: Geologic Time—Major Divisions and NPS Fossils The National Park System contains a magnificent record of geologic time because rocks from each period of the geologic time scale are preserved in park landscapes. The geologic time scale is divided into four large periods of time—the Cenozoic Era, Mesozoic Era, Paleozoic Era, and The Precambrian. photo of desert landscape with a petrified wood log on the surface Guide to the Henry G. Peabody Photograph Collection Finding aid for the Henry G. Peabody Collection Guide to the Thomas J. Allen Photograph Collection Finding aid for the Thomas J. Allen Photographs in the NPS History Collection. 50 Nifty Finds #6: Something Fishy How do fish get up the mountain? By horse, of course! When is a plant not a plant? When you plant a fish! What? No, those aren’t nonsensical kids’ jokes. Photographs from the NPS Historic Photograph Collection will help explain. A string of mules being led along a trail carrying milk cans Bison Roamed the Mountains Too Archeologists found evidence of bison in Glacier National Park’s high alpine environment. It changed how we understand these animals and the people who interacted with them. Bison skull on ground with green vegetation 50 Nifty Finds #9: Green Stamps Described by some as "the greatest propaganda campaign ever launched by the federal government to exploit the scenic wonders of the United States," the national park stamps issued by the U.S. Post Office Department in 1934 became one of the most recognized series of U.S. stamps. Despite being in the middle of the Great Depression, over one billion of the 10 national park stamps were printed in under two years. College of ten colorful national park stamps 50 Nifty Finds #11: Carving a Place in NPS History Few employees have left as visible a mark on National Park Service (NPS) exhibits as John A. Segeren. His work has been enjoyed by generations of park visitors who never knew his name but appreciated his intricate wood carvings and playful animal figures displayed in parks throughout the system. A master woodcarver described by former President Lyndon B. Johnson as "a legacy to this country," Segeren carved out his own place in NPS history. Round wooden plaque with bison, globe, and waterfall 50 Nifty Finds #13: The Artistry of Adult Coloring They say that coloring provides stress relief for adults as well as children. For artists at the National Park Service (NPS) Western Museum Laboratory in the 1930s, however, it wasn't easy to hand-color glass lanterns slides depicting the landscapes, people, plants, and animals of places they had never seen. Quality and accuracy were essential because the slides were used by rangers to illustrate lectures and to encourage people to visit national parks. Color image of a giant sequoia tree. The building and car at the base look tiny in comparison. 50 Nifty Finds #18: Portable Posters Many visitors to national parks today collect passport stamps, magnets, or other items to recall their trip and to show others where they’ve been. In the 1920s and 1930s the “must have” souvenirs weren’t created to be collected. National Park Service (NPS) windshield stickers served a practical administrative purpose; they were evidence that the automobile license fee drivers paid at some parks had been paid. Even so, Americans embraced their colorful, artistic designs. Four colorful Rocky Mountain National Park windshield stickers. 50 Nifty Finds #21: A Good Trip One of the first Congressional committees to conduct an inspection tour of national parks was the US House of Representatives Appropriations Committee during the summer of 1920. Given the financial needs of the fledgling National Park Service (NPS), it was a high-stakes tour. Although a few members of the press called the trip an unnecessary junket, the tour highlighted NPS needs and created Congressional support for budget increases throughout the 1920s. Hand-colored photo of a meadow and mountain 50 Nifty Finds #22: It's a Wrap! Rangers in leggings? It may not sound very practical or professional, but leggings were part of National Park Service (NPS) uniforms for decades. They weren’t the leggings we think of today though! Practical for protecting the legs, leather puttees or leggings were part of the "ranger look" from the earliest NPS uniforms. As the NPS evolved and the National Park System expanded, however, they became unfashionable and unnecessary. Brown leather puttees Girl Scouts Use Girl Scout Cookie Boxes to Create National Park Designs Have you ever considered how Girl Scout cookie boxes could be used for something other than the cookies themselves? In March of this year, six teams from the Girl Scouts of Northeast Texas in grades 6-12 partnered with local architects and engineers in Dallas Texas to compete in a design contest that transformed Girl Scout cookie boxes into National Park-themed structures. A view of a national park made from Girl Scout cookie boxes Making an Impact: Long-Term Monitoring of Natural Resources at Intermountain Region National Parks, 2021 Across the Intermountain Region, Inventory & Monitoring Division ecologists are helping to track the effects of climate change, provide baseline information for resource management, evaluate new technologies, and inspire the next generation of park stewards. This article highlights accomplishments achieved during fiscal year 2021. A man looks through binoculars at sunrise. Project Profile: Restore Whitebark Pine at Three Parks The National Park Service will build climate resilience and increase biodiversity in threatened whitebark pine forest ecosystems by increasing capacity to collect seed and propagate blister rust resistant seedlings. a man with a beard examines cones on a whitebark pine tree 2022 Freeman Tilden Award Recipients View regional recipients of the National Park Service Freeman Tilden Award, which recognizes outstanding contributions to the practice of interpretation and education by a NPS employee. Two women work with a tree while a young man records audio. Guide to the Stephen Tyng Mather Film Collection This finding aid describes the Stephen Tyng Mather Film Collection, part of the NPS History Collection. My Park Story: Julie Lindsay Julie Lindsay shares her story of first visiting NPS parks and a little bit of her journey to achieving her dream of working for the NPS. A smiling woman with short hair and glasses stands in front of a glacier. My Park Story: Jill Riggins Some NPS rangers don't wear a uniform or a flat hat! Find out what Jill does everyday as an Administrative Assistant to the Superintendent. A smiling woman in a black vest stands in front of Mount Rushmore National Memorial. Working the Night Shift: Glacier’s First Nocturnal Pollinator Bioblitz In 2023, the Glacier National Park Citizen Science Program hosted their first-ever Nocturnal Pollinator Bioblitz to investigate the important work of these under-researched creatures. This bioblitz focused on moths, which have been virtually undocumented in the park, despite being the most abundant nocturnal pollinators. This bioblitz focused on moths, which have been virtually undocumented in the park, despite being the most abundant nocturnal pollinators. A group of people gather around a vertically stretched white sheets covered in moths at night. Alpine Vegetation Resource Brief Alpine vegetation combines biological diversity with scenic beauty at the heart of the Crown of the Continent Ecosystem. However, the extent and diversity of alpine habitats are currently being threatened by the potential of treeline ecotones to move upward. Scientists and staff at Glacier National Park are committed to the anticipation and interpretation of the changing alpine environments. A person carrying a clipboard kneels next to a grid laid out on alpine vegetation. 50 Nifty Finds #35: On the Same Track In 1915 Stephen T. Mather was hired by Secretary of Interior Franklin K. Lane to build public and political support for a new bureau for national parks. To implement his vision, Mather called on an industry with a track record in publicizing western national parks—the nation’s railroad companies. Brochure cover for Glacier National Park hotels and tours featuring a large inn Glacier's Green Team Gains Sustainable decision making has been at the forefront of many park operations and Glacier is no exception. The Green Team at Glacier National Park, founded in 2004, have laid groundwork for sustainability initiatives both in and out of the park, furthering the decree of protecting and preserving Glacier for current and future generations. A ranger deposits a soda can into a recycling container in the park. 50 Nifty Finds #38: A Germ of an Idea A lot of articles have been written about the history of the National Park Service (NPS) arrowhead emblem. Many recycle the same content and outdated information that has largely come from the NPS itself. Challenging the traditional story has revealed new sources of information—and two previously overlooked arrowhead designs—that rewrite the arrowhead origin story. Wooden arrowhead plaque on stand From Buffalo Soldier to Bath Attendant: The Story of Hugh Hayes and Hot Springs National Park Learn about the life of Hugh Hayes, an African American man from Tennessee, and how his life as a Buffalo Soldier and bath attendant at Hot Springs National Park connected him to significant moments in American history. African American man wearing a white shirt and tie sits in a wooden chair 50 Nifty Finds #39: An NPS Art Factory Between 1938 and 1941 the National Park Service (NPS) Western Museum Laboratories (WML) created many iconic posters. Often described as “the WPA park posters,” they should be called “the WML posters.” Research reveals more designs than previously thought (including several previously unknown ones), reevaluates what is known about the artists, and argues that modern reproductions have made the designs more significant to NPS graphic identity today than they were in the past. Poster with a purple El Capitan at Yosemite The Devoted People behind Big Data in National Parks Citizen science volunteers collect massive amounts of crucial scientific information. They gather it from sources as varied as oceans, mountainsides, and historic archives. Smart new tools are making their contributions even more powerful. Two smiling women stand in front of a national park sign. Bipartisan Infrastructure Law and Inflation Reduction Act support range-wide efforts to rescue disease-addled whitebark pine forests In 2023, Bipartisan Infrastructure Law and Inflation Reduction Act funds enabled whitebark pine recovery work at 10 national parks. In addition to identifying disease resistant trees and cultivating rust-resistant seedlings, increased staffing and expanded partnerships will also allow parks to collect and store seed during years when the pines produce massive amounts of seed during "mast" events. a whitebark pine tree on a hillside My Park Story: Todd Grabow Read about Todd's path to landing a job at a park that holds a special place in his heart! A smiling man stands next to a red helicopter in front of a mountain range at sunset. Long-Distance Hikers Navigate the Hazards of a Changing Climate For those who hike America’s thousand plus-mile national trails end-to-end, the benefits transcend the risks. But the effects of a warming world challenge even the most intrepid. A smiling, bearded man with a backpack and binoculars in front of a lake ringed with evergreen trees
Glacier National Park National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Offcial Summer 2019 Newspaper Sunset over the Livingston Range as seen from Going-to-the-Sun Road. Follow us @GlacierNPS Crown of the Continent Want Glacier to feature you? Posting about conservation, Leave No Trace, and safety helps spread and Welcome to Glacier National Park, one of the crown jewels of the National Park System. The combination of natural wonders, cultural history, and our shared border with Waterton Lakes National Park, in Canada, contributed to Glacier being recognized, worldwide, as a World Heritage Site, a Biosphere Reserve, the World’s frst International Peace Park, and the World’s frst International Dark Sky Park. No matter how long your visit we hope you discover your own special aspect of this spectacular landscape. Glacier has a short season and a visit will take a bit of planning. Throughout the summer congestion can be an issue and some areas of the park may have access restricted temporarily due to crowding. The best plan is to get an early start. Parking areas fll early. Unseasonable snowfall or wildland fres may impact your plans. Have a backup itinerary, in case your frst choice is already full or crowded. While in Montana you may wish to visit other, less well known, areas of the National Park System. Check on page 13 for options throughout the state. support the mission of the National Park Service. Use #ProtectGlacier on posts about these topics and we might feature you. Consider the negative impacts a location geotag might have on a sensitive environment before posting. What do your images portray? You might like to free-solo up mountains without a helmet or whitewater raft without a life jacket, but be cautious about promoting dangerous activities without context. Do you have a permit for that? Commercial services are carefully regulated in national parks because no one wants to see these wild places overrun with advertising. Product ambassadors, brand infuencers, and other marketers need a commercial Many people are starting to reconsider the way they use social media in wild places; learn more in the side bar to the right. Help Stop Aquatic Invasive Species photography permit. Table of Contents General and Camping Information .........2 Services and Facilities Dates & Hours ......3 Bear Safety & Regulations ......................4 Wildlife & Safety Tips .............................5 Glacier National Park protects the headwaters of North America and preserving the park’s famously clean waters is essential to our mission. All watercraft must be inspected before launching. Motorized boats are subject to a 30-day drying time prior to launching. Motorized or trailered watercraft are prohibited from launching on all waters except Lake McDonald. Driving & Bicycling Information ..............6 Points of Interest....................................7 Hiking Information & Trail Maps..........8-9 Glacier’s Offcial Partners ................10-11 Saving the Park’s Glaciers.....................12 Montana’s Other National Parks...........13 Clean Your Boat Inside and Out Clean all plants, animals, sand, mud, and other debris from your boat, trailer, anchor, boots, and equipment as soon as you leave one body of water. This includes, but is not limited to, canoes, kayaks, sailboats, paddleboards, and foat tubes. Drain Your Boat Inside and Out Drain all the water from your boat, including the motor, bilge, live-well, and other compartments before you arrive in the park. Leave the bilge plug out during transport. Do not dump water or organisms from one water body into another. Dry Your Boat Inside and Out Dry all compartments and equipment in the sun for at least fve days before entering another body of water or use high-pressure, hot (120 to 140 F) water to clean your boat, trailer, waders, boots, and equipment. In Waterton National Park Private motorized and trailer launched boats are only permitted on Upper and Middle Waterton Lakes after a 90-day quarantine period evidenced by a seal attached at the Waterton marina. For more information on this program, visit: https://id4waterton.ca/. All non-motorized hand launched watercraft require a selfcertifcation permit available at park ofces and at popular launch areas (includes small boats powered by wind or humans, like canoes, kayaks, paddleboards, windsurfers, and rowboats). Flotation devices such as foat tubes do not require a permit. Since the permit is a legal requirement, park wardens will check for permits and will take appropriate action as necessary. Glacier’s Neighbors ..............................14 In 2018, we celebrated the 50th anniversary of the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act. Americans called for this legislation to protect the nation’s rivers when they were most vulnerable. Boat Inspection Locations & Hours Lake McDonald* May 11–May 25..................... 7 am–5 pm May 26–Oct. 31..................... 7 am–9 pm Waterton La
Park News National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Visitor Guide The official newspaper of Glacier National Park Fall, Winter, and Spring 2016/2017 Fall, Winter, and Spring NPS / BILL HAYDEN AND JACOB FRANK Visiting in the “Off Season” Visitor services are limited from October through late spring, but there are still many opportunities to explore the park. SCENIC DRIVES CAMPING There are many opportunities for exploring the park in your vehicle, both along the Going-to-the-Sun Road and in other locations of the park. The upper portion of the Going-to-the-Sun Road usually remains open through the third weekend in October. Vehicle access to the Lake McDonald Lodge area is generally available all winter. The road beyond there is open for skiing and snowshoeing once adequate snowfall has occurred. Some campgrounds remain open, in primitive status (no water), into October. November through March the Apgar and St. Mary Campgrounds will be open for winter primitive camping. At times in the fall and spring there will be no vehicle access to the St. Mary Campground and it will be available for walk-in camping only. The roads to Many Glacier, Two Medicine, and the North Fork also provide opportunities to see wildlife and fall color, weather permitting. FOOD AND LODGING Accommodations and restaurants inside the park will be closed for the season, but are available in surrounding communities. Middle Fork of the Flathead River NPS / BILL HAYDEN • MANY GLACIER • TWO MEDICINE • NORTH FORK In the fall and spring, the northeast corner of the park provides access to spectacular wildlife habitat. Watch along the sides of the road for elk, deer, and moose on the drive in. Once you reach the parking area at the end of the road, scan the hillsides for bighorn sheep, mountain goats, and bear. Several trails lead to some of the best day hikes in the park. Iceberg Lake and Grinnell Glacier are highlights. During the winter, access is by ski or snowshoe only. The southeast corner of the park is a quiet retreat in fall and spring. Uncrowded trails abound along the lakes and up the mountainsides. The Running Eagle Falls Nature Trail is a highlight and the falls (formerly known as Trick Falls) look completely different in the fall than they do in the spring. The drive to Two Medicine is bordered by some of the best aspen stands in the area and are great locations to look for warblers and other birds. The dirt roads in this area of the park are narrow and dusty and lead to a more secluded section of the park. A mosaic of burned and unburned landscapes offers a variety of habitats for wildlife, and visitors are sometimes rewarded with the sounds, and an occasional sighting, of wolves. Moose, elk, deer, and bear also find refuge in this quiet corner of Glacier. Drive slowly and be prepared to pull over to allow for oncoming vehicles to pass. Whereever you drive in the park, please obey all traffic regulations. Use the pullouts provided to allow for other traffic to pass, and please never feed or approach wildlife. Have a safe and enjoyable visit. Construction Activities • ST. MARY ENTRANCE STATION From September 19, 2016 to October 17, 2016 vehicles will not be permitted in the area of the St. Mary Entrance Station kiosks. Traffic will be routed through the visitor center parking area and fee collection will take place at the visitor center. On Monday, October 17, 2016, the Goingto-the-Sun Road will be closed to vehicular traffic, just past the park entrance sign. Hikers, bikers, and skiers will be able to • AVALANCHE CREEK FOOTBRIDGE access the east side of the Going-to-the-Sun Road using a newly reconstructed pathway from the town of St. Mary to the St. Mary Visitor Center. During construction activities in the fall and spring there will be no vehicle access to the St. Mary Campground. In mid-winter, when construction is temporarily halted due to weather, vehicle access may resume for winter camping at the St. Mary. Beginning in early September a portion of the Trail of the Cedars, on the south side of the creek, will be closed to begin work on a new footbridge. After the campground closes, vehicle access into the campground will be closed to all traffic to accommodate construction vehicles. Hiking access to Avalanche Lake, via the trail north of the creek, should remain open during this time. Follow Us Online facebook.com/GlacierNPS twitter.com/GlacierNPS instagram.com/GlacierNPS Pages 2 & 3 Winter in Glacier Pages 4 & 5 Visiting in the Spring Pages 6 & 7 Wildlife Safety Glacier’s long cold winter can be a harsh time of the year for park wildlife, but it can also be a wonderful time to visit. The entire park takes on a different character. A quiet snowshoe walk or an invigorating cross country ski can reveal a side of the park not often seen by most park visitors. Special precautions are needed, however, to safely enjoy a winter visit. Glacier’s brief springtime is characterized by Pacific
A Pass Akamina Lake Wall Lake Goat Haunt and North Fork Trails Mount Custer 59 Lake Nooney Upper Kintla Lake RID GE NU M A Stoney Indian Lake Stoney Indian Pass n to er at W r ve Ri Vulture Peak E AK QUARTZ L 66 Mount Geduhn Grace Lake 64 z art Qu E LAK NG I GG LO ek Cre Lake Evangeline Longfellow Peak 63 Quartz Creek Riv er 3 Miles Kootenai Lakes Mount Cleveland Kootenai Peak KE LA Day Hikes in Glacier Goat Haunt Mountain 67 60 Cerulean Lake 58 3 Kilometers ek Cre GE RID 55 Hidden Meadow Winona Lake North Goat Haunt Covey Meadow Loop Trail d hea Flat Polebridge Townsite Upper Waterton Lake k ee Cr 56 e Cr Lake Janet Olson National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior d al on cD M Polebridge 0 Lake Francis Mount Carter Middle Quartz Lake Lower Quartz Lake ek th Nor an m w o B Fo rk 62 BO WM AN A Bowman Lake 68 E UPIN PORC Creek ntine Vale 65 kala Creek ko Glacier 57 Brown Pass Thunderbird Mountain 54 Hell Roaring Falls Campbell Mountain 61 Kintla Lake 0 Lake Wurdeman Kintla Peak Akokala Lake Upper Bertha Falls Bertha Lake Carcajou Lake Boulder Pass KI LA NT Alderson Lake Boundary Creek Creek tla Kin KE LA Lakes Mount Alderson 8832ft 2692m Summit Lake AKAMINA-KISHINENA PROVINCIAL PARK g in gg Lo Ruger Lake Grizzly and Cubs Camas Lake TERRY DOSSEY IN BEAR COUNTRY DON’T SURPRISE BEARS! Bears will ek Cre usually move out of the way if they hear Dutch Lake Logging Creek people approaching, so make noise. Most Arrow Lake bells are not enough. Calling out and clapping hands loudly at regular intervals are better ways to make your presence known. A bear constantly surprised by quiet hikers Map Legend Campground Visitor Center Lodging Ranger Station Unpaved Roads may become habituated to close human Trails Paved Roads 1 contact and less likely to avoid people. This sets up a dangerous situation for both visi- Trail Destination tors and bears. Hiking quietly endangers Destination One-way Mileage & Elevation Trailhead Destination 54 Akokala Lake 5.8 mi. - gains 800 ft. Bowman Lake Ranger Station 62 55 Bowman Lake Head 7.1 mi. - rolling hills Bowman Lake Ranger Station 56 Covey Meadow 1.5 mi. - rolling hills Polebridge Ranger Station 57 Goat Haunt Overlook 1.0 mi. - gains 800 ft. Goat Haunt Ranger Station 58 Hidden Meadow 1.2 mi. - gains 250 ft. 3 miles south of Polebridge Ranger Station you, the bear, and other hikers. One-way Mileage & Elevation Trailhead Lake Janet 3.3 mi. - gains 750 ft. Goat Haunt Ranger Station 63 Logging Lake 4.5 mi. - gains 400 ft. Just north of the Logging Creek Ranger Station 64 Lower Quartz Lake (a) 3.0 mi. - gains 1200 ft. then descends 1000 ft. (b) 6.9 mi. - gains 500 ft Bowman Lake Picnic Area Numa Lookout 5.6 mi. - gains 2930 ft. Bowman Lake Ranger Station 66 Quartz Lake 6.0 mi. - gains 1800 ft. then descends 1600 ft. Bowman Lake Picnic Area 59 Kintla Lake Head 6.6 mi. - rolling hills .25 miles west of Kintla Lake Campground 60 Kootenai Lakes 2.5 mi. - gains 200 ft. Goat Haunt Ranger Station 67 Rainbow Falls 1.0 mi. - gains 30 ft. Goat Haunt Ranger Station 61 Lake Francis 6.2 mi. - gains 1050 ft. Goat Haunt Ranger Station 68 Waterton Townsite 8.5 mi. - gains 200 ft. Goat Haunt Ranger Station LEAVE NO TRACE PRINCIPLES TRIP PLANNING INFORMATION Challenge, adventure, a sense of discovery, 1. Plan Ahead and Prepare Hiking books and maps are an excellent and solitude can be part of your backcountry 2. Travel and Camp on Durable Surfaces way of preparing for your trip. The experience. But in order to ensure that 3. Leave What You Find Glacier National Park Conservancy is a Glacier’s backcountry remains unimpaired 4. Properly Dispose of Waste nonprofit organization working with the for future generations, visitors must be moti- 5. Minimize Campfire Impacts National Park Service to assist Glacier’s vated by an ethic that compels responsibility 6. Respect Wildlife educational and interpretive activities, toward the resource. It is the task of every 7. Be Considerate of Other Visitors cultural programs, and special projects. They stock a number of publications that Leave No Trace skills and ethics. are excellent pre-planning guides. Glacier National Park Conservancy a national program promoting responsible PO Box 2749 outdoor recreation and stewardship of our Columbia Falls, MT 59912 public lands. The National Park Service is a 406-892-3250 partner in this program, along with other info@gnpconservancy.org federal land management agencies. www.glaciernationalparkconservancy.org This copyrighted information has been reprinted with permission from the Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics. For more information or materials, please visit www.LNT.org or call 303.442.8222. NPS / TIM RAINS might be encountered along a trail. People often assume they don’t have to make nois
Glacier National Park Montana National Park Service U. S. Department of the Interior Bird Checklist Observer __________________________________________________________________________________ Date ______________________________________ Common names conform with the American Birding Association Checklist Update, 2015. List compiled by David S. Shea, November, 1971. Revised by Dave Shea, Steve Gniadek, and Lisa Bate, November, 2015. TIME OF YEAR S Spring (March-May) S Summer (June-August) F Fall (September-November) W Winter (December-February) RANGE E East of Continental Divide W West of Continental Divide A Mountainous areas above treeline OCCURRENCE ab Abundant a Accidental c Common u Uncommon r Rare SPECIAL CONDITIONS l Introduced u Known to nest in the park S S FW SWANS, GEESE, DUCKS Greater White-fronted Goose W Snow Goose E, W Ross’s Goose E, W Canada Goose u E, W Trumpeter Swan u E, W Tundra Swan E, W Wood Duck u E, W Gadwall E, W Eurasian Wigeon W American Wigeon E, W u E, W Mallard Blue-winged Teal E, W Cinnamon Teal E, W Green-winged Teal E, W Northern Shoveler E, W Northern Pintail E, W Canvasback E, W Redhead E, W Ring-necked Duck u E, W Greater Scaup W Lesser Scaup E, W Harlequin Duck u E, W Surf Scoter W White-winged Scoter E, W Long-tailed Duck W Bufflehead u E, W Common Goldeneye u E, W Barrow’s Goldeneye u E, W Hooded Merganser u E, W Common Merganser u E, W Red-breasted Merganser u E, W Ruddy Duck E, W u r c r c r u a c c u u u c u r u c a u u r r u c c u u r r c r r r r u u r a a c c r c c c u u u u u u u u r u u r r u r u u u u u r r r a c c r u c c u u c c r r r u Pied-billed Grebe Horned Grebe Eared Grebe Red-necked Grebe Western Grebe r u r u r r u r u u r u Sandhill Crane u E, W r r r r r Black-necked Stilt E, W r American Avocet E, W r STILT, AVOCET E,W r r r r E, W r r PELICAN HERONS, BITTERNS, IBIS American Bittern u E, W Great Blue Heron u E, W Black-crowned Night Heron W Great Egret W r r r u u u r a a IBIS W a r VULTURE, HAWKS, EAGLES, FALCONS Yellow Rail Virginia Rail Sora American Coot c c r r c r E, W u E, W E, W u E, W u E, W u E, W W E, W u E, W u E, W E, W E, W u E, W u E, W, A u E, W E, W E, W E, W u E, W, A u u u u u u u c u u u u u u u u u u a a a r r r c c c r r r u u u r r r u u u r r r a a r r r u u u r r r W W u E, W E, W This publication made possible by a donation from the Glacier National Park Conservancy Black-bellied Plover Semipalmated Plover Killdeer Spotted Sandpiper Solitary Sandpiper Upland Sandpiper Baird’s Sandpiper Least Sandpiper Pectoral Sandpiper Semipalmated Sandpiper Western Sandpiper Greater Yellowlegs Lesser Yellowlegs Willet Long-billed Curlew Marbled Godwit Sanderling Long-billed Dowitcher Wilson's Snipe Wilson’s Phalarope Red-necked Phalarope GULLS, TERNS r u r r r RAILS, COOT W W u E, W W S S FW SHOREBIRDS American White Pelican a r r u u u r a c c c u c r u r c u u u CORMORANT a c c c c c c c c c c c c r u u u u r r E, W E, W u E, W u E, W E, W Double-crested Cormorant Turkey Vulture Osprey Northern Harrier Sharp-shinned Hawk Cooper’s Hawk Northern Goshawk Red-shouldered Hawk Broad-winged Hawk Swainson’s Hawk Red-tailed Hawk Rough-legged Hawk Ferruginous Hawk Bald Eagle Golden Eagle American Kestrel Merlin Gyrfalcon Peregrine Falcon Prairie Falcon CRANE White-faced Ibis LOONS Red-throated Loon Pacific Loon Common Loon Yellow-billed Loon S S FW GREBES GROUSE, PTARMIGAN, TURKEY Ring-necked Pheasant lW Ruffed Grouse u E, W Spruce Grouse u E, W Dusky Grouse u E, W, A Sharp-tailed Grouse E White-tailed Ptarmigan uA Wild Turkey W r r u u c c c r Black-legged Kittiwake Sabine's Gull Bonaparte’s Gull Franklin’s Gull Ring-billed Gull California Gull Herring Gull Glaucous-winged Gull Glaucous Gull Caspian Tern Black Tern Common Tern Forster’s Tern r E, W E, W u E, W u E, W E, W E E, W W E, W W W E, W E, W E, W E, W E, W W E, W u E, W E, W E, W a a c u u r r a a c c r c c u u r r r r r r r r r r r r r u r r r c c u u u r r r W W E, W E, W E, W E, W E, W W W E, W u E, W E a a r r u u c u c c u c r a a r r r r r r E, W r NPS PHOTO / Common Merganser Western Tanager - NPS / DAVID RESTIVO PIGEONS, DOVES S S FW Rock Pigeon l E, W r r Eurasian Collared-Dove lW r Band-tailed Pigeon W a Mourning Dove E, W u u u OWLS Western Screech-Owl Great Horned Owl Snowy Owl Northern Hawk Owl Northern Pygmy-Owl Burrowing Owl Barred Owl Great Gray Owl Long-eared Owl Short-eared Owl Boreal Owl Northern Saw-whet Owl u E, W u E, W E, W u E, W u E, W W u E, W u E, W u E, W E, W u E, W u E, W r r r u u u r r r r u u u a u u u r r r r r r r r r r r r r r u r r u S S FW r r Horned Lark E,W, A r r r r Tennessee Warbler u E, W u u Orange-crowned Warbler u E, W u u Nashville Warbler E, W r MacGillivray’s Warbler u E, W c c Common Yellowthroat u E, W c c American Redstart u E, W u u Cape May Warbler E,W a a Northern Pa
Glacier National Park Montana National Park Service U. S. Department of the Interior Mammal Checklist Common and scientific names from Bradley and others 2014, Revised Checklist of North American Mammals North of Mexico, 2014. List compiled by David S. Shea, November 1971. Revised by David S. Shea, Steve Gniadek, and Lisa Bate, November 2015. ORDER LAGOMORPHA - PIKA, RABBITS, HARES E Occurs east of the Continental Divide W Occurs west of the Continental Divide A Occurs in alpine areas (mountainous areas above treeline) R Occurs only rarely in the park H Historically in park, but no longer present ORDER CHIROPTERA - BATS American pika (Ochotona princeps) Rockslides E W A Silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans) Coniferous forests, meadow edges, open water E W Snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus) Coniferous forests E W Big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus) Coniferous forests, buildings, bridges, caves E W White-tailed jackrabbit (Lepus townsendii) Grasslands E R Hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus) Coniferous and deciduous forests, meadow edges E W Mountain cottontail (Sylvilagus nuttallii) Forests, brushy areas E R Eastern red bat (Lasiurus borealis) Coniferous and deciduous forests, meadow edges E ORDER SORICOMORPHA-INSECTIVORES - SHREWS American pygmy shrew (Sorex hoyi) Dry, open coniferous forests W California myotis (Myotis californicus) Coniferous forests, meadows R W Long-eared myotis (Myotis evotis) Coniferous forests, meadows E W Masked shrew (Sorex cinereus) Coniferous forests E W Little brown myotis (Myotis lucifugus) Over open water, coniferous forests, buildings, caves E W Vagrant shrew (Sorex vagrans) Moist forests and grasslands, marsh and stream edges E W A Long-legged myotis (Myotis volans) Coniferous forests, meadows E W A Montane shrew (Sorex monticolus) Higher elevation coniferous forests E W Yuma myotis (Myotis yumanensis) Over open water, forests American water shrew (Sorex palustris) Stream edges E W W ORDER CARNIVORA - CARNIVORES ORDER RODENTIA - RODENTS Bobcat (Lynx rufus) Open forests, brushy areas E W R North American porcupine (Erethizon dorsatum) Coniferous forests E W Lynx (Lynx canadensis) Coniferous forests E W R American beaver (Castor canadensis) Streams, lakes E W Mountain lion (Puma concolor) Coniferous forests E W Northern pocket gopher (Thomomys talpoides) Meadows E W A Northern raccoon (Procyon lotor) Open forests, stream bottoms E W Yellow-bellied marmot (Marmota flaviventris) Open, rocky foothills; talus slopes E American black bear (Ursus americanus) Forests, slide areas, alpine meadows E W A Hoary marmot (Marmota caligata) Rocky areas, alpine meadows E W A Grizzly bear (Ursus arctos) Forests, slide areas, alpine meadows E W A Least chipmunk (Tamias minimus) High, open forests; brushy, rocky areas; alpine meadows E W A Red fox (Vulpes vulpes) Grasslands, open forest E W Yellow-pine chipmunk (Tamias amoenus) Open forests; brushy, rocky areas E W Swift fox (Vulpes velox) Eastside grasslands E Red-tailed chipmunk (Tamias ruficaudus) Open forests; brushy, rocky areas E W Coyote (Canis latrans) Forests, grasslands E W A E W A Gray wolf (Canis lupus) Forests, grasslands E W Golden-mantled ground squirrel (Callospermophilus lateralis) High, open forests; rocky areas E W Columbian ground squirrel (Urocitellus columbianus) Open woodlands, grasslands, alpine meadows E W A Striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis) Open forests, grasslands R E W Thirteen-lined ground squirrel (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) Grasslands E American badger (Taxidea taxus) Grasslands Northern river otter (Lontra canadensis) Rivers, lakes E W Richardson's ground squirrel (Urocitellus richardsonii) Grasslands E R Wolverine (Gulo gulo) Coniferous forests, alpine meadows E W A Northern flying squirrel (Glaucomys sabrinus) Coniferous forests E W Least weasel (Mustela nivalis) Open forests, grasslands E W Red squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) Coniferous forests E W Short-tailed weasel (Mustela erminea) Coniferous forests, meadows E W A Western jumping mouse (Zapus princeps) Grasslands, alpine meadows E W A Long-tailed weasel (Mustela frenata) Open forests, meadows E W A Bushy-tailed wood rat (Neotoma cinerea) Rocky areas, old buildings E W A American mink (Vison vison) Creek and lake edges E W North American deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus) Forests, grasslands, alpine meadows E W A American marten (Martes americana) Coniferous forests E W Common muskrat (Ondatra zibethicus) Streams, lakes, marshy areas E W Fisher (Pekania pennanti) Coniferous forests E W R R R R R ORDER ARTIODACTYLA - EVEN-TOED UNGULATES R W Southern red-backed vole (Myodes gapperi) Moist coniferous forests E W Western heather vole (Phenacomys intermedius) Coniferous forests, alpine meadows E W A Pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) Eastside prairies E White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) Coniferous forests, meadows,
World Heritage Sites in the United States Governor’s House, La Fortaleza and San Juan National Historical Site Red-footed booby, Papahaˉnaumokuaˉ kea Morning Glory Pool, Yellowstone National Park © HARVEY BARRISON © KRIS KRUG JEFF SULLIVAN PHOTOGRAPHY 2 Kluane /  Wrangell-St. Elias / Glacier Bay /  Tatshenshini-Alsek 1 Statue of Liberty Grand Canyon National Park © MICHAEL BELL PIXABAY/SKEEZE © MICHAEL LOYD Olympic National Park 3 WA SH I N GTO N - 19 81 Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park vii • ix vii • viii • ix • x A L A SK A (US), C A N A DA - 1979 Features temperate rainforest, glaciers, peaks, alpine meadows, old-growth forest, and wilderness coastline. Critical habitat for endangered species including northern spotted owl and bull trout. www.nps.gov/olym Over 24 million acres of wild lands and waters are changed by glaciers and volcanic activity. www.nps.gov/glba, www.nps.gov/wrst www.pc.gc.ca/en/pn-np/yt/kluane www.env.gov.bc.ca/bcparks/explore vii • ix © MIKE CRISS Montana (US), Canada - 1995 World’s first international peace park. Rich biodiversity and outstanding scenery with prairie, forest, alpine, and glacial features. www.nps.gov/glac www.pc.gc.ca/en/pn-np/ab/waterton/ Grinnell Point © MIKE KOCH Old Faithful © MARK STEVENS 23 © STEVE BOND Yellowstone National Park vii • viii • ix • x Renowned for geothermal features, Yellowstone has the world’s largest concentration of geysers. Protects grizzly bears, wolves, bison, and elk. www.nps.gov/yell iii • iv I L L I N O I S - 19 82 With over 1,100 properties, the World Heritage List This urban complex flourished 1000– 1350 CE (Common Era). Regional center for prehistoric Mississippian culture. www.cahokiamounds.org shows a shared global commitment to preserve the world’s most important natural and cultural sites. Monks Mound Learn more about the World Heritage sites in the 22 4 Cahokia Mounds State Historic Site Preserved for All Humanity W YO M I N G, M O N TA N A , I DA H O - 1978 © JIM WARK/AIRPHOTO United States, described here with selection criteria Redwood National and State Parks This gift from France to the United States is a symbol of international friendship, peace, progress, freedom, democracy, and human migration. Renowned for art and engineering. www.nps.gov/stli World Heritage Sites in the United States can be pur- Coastal mountain home to California brown pelicans, sea lions, bald eagles, and ancient redwood forest—the world’s tallest trees. www.nps.gov/redw i • vi N E W YO R K - 19 8 4 scription year, and websites. The Passport booklet C A L I F O R N I A - 19 8 0 Statue of Liberty 5 in Roman numerals (details other side), location, in- vii • ix Black bear, Great Smoky Mountains National Park chased at www.eparks.com. For more on the World Pixabay Heritage List: whc.unesco.org/en/statesparties/us. © AMY HUDECHEK Natural Papahaˉnaumokuaˉkea iii • vi • viii • ix • x Cultural Mixed 21 6 H AWA I I - 2010 Independence Hall This vast living “cultural seascape” embodies kinship of people to place in Native Hawaiian cosmology. Includes seamounts, endemic species, critical habitats, and coral reefs. www.papahanaumokuakea.gov vi P EN N S Y LVA N I A - 1979 An international symbol of freedom and democracy, this 18th-century building is where the Declaration of Independence and Constitution were created and signed. www.nps.gov/inde Greg McFall / NOAA 20 Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park © TODD LANDRY viii H AWA I I - 19 87 Earth’s greatest mass of volcanoes, including Mauna Loa and Kilauea, tower over a “hotspot” in the mantle. Continuous geologic activity builds an ever changing landscape home to rare and endemic species. www.nps.gov/havo 21 7 PACIFIC OCEAN 0 Hawaii Everglades National Park viii • ix • x 20 F LO R I DA - 1979 800 Kilometers 0 800 Miles North America’s largest subtropical wilderness has several vital habitats for plants and animals including Florida panthers and manatees. Key area for bird migration and breeding. www.nps.gov/ever NPS Yosemite National Park 19 vii • viii © CARLTON WARD JR. C A L I F O R N I A - 19 8 4 Glacial erosion helped sculpt this scenic landscape. Soaring granite cliffs, polished domes, high waterfalls, sequoia groves, wilderness, deep-cut valleys, and alpine meadow habitats. www.nps.gov/yose 18 Chaco Culture iii Castillo San Felipe del Morro N E W M E X I CO - 19 87 © ANGEL LOPEZ Prehistoric, monumental masonry structures in Chaco Canyon, along with a network of roads and outlier sites like Aztec Ruins, exhibit the vast influence of the ancestral Puebloan culture on the Southwestern landscape. www.nps.gov/azru, www.nps.gov/chcu © JOCELYN PANTALEON HIDALGO The 20th-century Architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright La Fortaleza and San Juan National Historic Site vi © OJEFFREY PHOTOGRAPHY P U ERTO R I CO - 19 8 3 ii Strategic defensive structures represent early European military architecture, e

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