Freedom Riders

National Monument - Alabama

The Freedom Riders National Monument is located in Anniston, Alabama. It preserves and commemorates the Freedom Riders during the Civil Rights Movement.

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Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/frri/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freedom_Riders_National_Monument The Freedom Riders National Monument is located in Anniston, Alabama. It preserves and commemorates the Freedom Riders during the Civil Rights Movement. In 1961, a small interracial band of “Freedom Riders” challenged discriminatory laws requiring separation of the races in interstate travel. They were attacked by white segregationists, who firebombed the bus. Images of the attack appeared in hundreds of newspapers, shocking the American public and spurring the Federal Government to issue regulations banning segregation in interstate travel. Directions to the Bus Burning Site, from Atlanta and Points East: From I-20, take exit 179 toward AL-202 E/US-78/Coldwater. Merge onto Alabama State Highway 202. Turn right onto Old Birmingham Hwy. The Bus Burning site is located on the right. Limited parking is available at the burn site with entry from the Old Birmingham Hwy. There is no authorized parking or pedestrian activity along State Route 202. For directions to the Anniston Greyhound Bus Depot, click on link below. Interim Visitor Center The temporary visitor center for Freedom Riders National Monument is located inside the Calhoun County Area Chamber & Visitors Center From Atlanta and Points East From I-20, take exit 185 to Alabama State Hwy 21 North. Follow AL-21 N to Quintard Ave in Anniston. Merge onto AL-21 N/S Quintard Ave. Make a U-turn at E 15th St. Continue straight, until you see the Chamber of Commerce sign on your right. From Birmingham and Points West From I-20, take exit 179 and follow AL-202 to Quintard Ave in Anniston. Turn left onto Priebes Mill Rd.Continue onto AL-202. Turn left onto Noble St. Turn right onto E 14th St. Turn right onto Quintard Ave.Con Greyhound Mural Colored Greyhound mural with historical information about the Freedom Riders Greyhound mural at the Anniston Greyhound Bus Depot. Anniston Greyhound Bus Depot street view of a yellow brick bus depot, with a black awning and NPS sign, and an alley entrance. The Anniston Greyhound Bus Depot at Freedom Riders National Monument in Anniston AL, site of an attack on Freedom Riders in May of 1961. Conservation Diaries: Kia Hill, Storyteller of Black History and Administrator Meet Kia Hill, the secretary for the superintendent of Birmingham Civil Rights National Monument and the Freedom Riders National Monument in Alabama. Before landing this job, Kia was an intern and a park ranger at Selma to Montgomery National Historic Trail. Learn more about Kia’s journey to the National Park Service and her passion for storytelling and being a role model for Black youth. park ranger walking through an open bridge The Modern Civil Rights Movement in the National Capital Area The national capital area’s everyday people contributed to the overall success of the modern Civil Rights Movement. From students to pastors, lawyers to teachers, parents and every-day people planned efforts between the 1950s to the 1960s to eliminate segregation and the discrimination. Civil Rights leaders surrounded by journalists and media. Series: A Timeline of Resistance: The Perseverance of African Americans from the Revolutionary War to the Civil Rights Era The story of African American’s fight for equality did not begin or end with the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s. In the National Capital Area, dedicated activism and self-determination has been documented since the Revolutionary War through the present day. This series consists of six articles that outline distinct timelines of resistance and activism in the fight for freedom. A young African American girl gazes at the camera holding a banner for the March on Washington

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