by Alex Gugel , all rights reserved

Death Valley

National Park - CA,NV

Death Valley National Park straddles eastern California and Nevada. It’s known for Titus Canyon, with a ghost town and colorful rocks, and Badwater Basin’s salt flats, North America's lowest point. Above, Telescope Peak Trail weaves past pine trees. North of the spiky salt mounds known as the Devil’s Golf Course, rattlesnakes live in Mesquite Flat Sand Dunes.

location

maps

Official visitor map of Death Valley National Park (NP) in California and Nevada. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Death Valley - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Death Valley National Park (NP) in California and Nevada. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Detail Map of Furnace Creek at Death Valley National Park (NP) in California and Nevada. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Death Valley - Furnace Creek

Detail Map of Furnace Creek at Death Valley National Park (NP) in California and Nevada. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with DOI's Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with DOI's Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of Designated Dispersed Campsites at Alabama Hills National Scenic Area & Special Recreation Management Area (NSA & SRMA) in the BLM Bishop Field Office area in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Alabama Hills - Designated Dispersed Campsites

Map of Designated Dispersed Campsites at Alabama Hills National Scenic Area & Special Recreation Management Area (NSA & SRMA) in the BLM Bishop Field Office area in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Vintage 1948 USGS 1:250000 Map of Death Valley in California and Nevada. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).Vintage USGS - Death Valley - 1948

Vintage 1948 USGS 1:250000 Map of Death Valley in California and Nevada. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

Vintage 1958 USGS 1:250000 Map of Goldfield in Nevada and California. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).Vintage USGS - Goldfield - 1958

Vintage 1958 USGS 1:250000 Map of Goldfield in Nevada and California. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

Vintage 1947 USGS 1:250000 Map of Bakersfield in California. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).Vintage USGS - Trona - 1947

Vintage 1947 USGS 1:250000 Map of Bakersfield in California. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

Vintage 1948 USGS 1:250000 map of Bakersfield in California. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).Vintage USGS - Bakersfield - 1948

Vintage 1948 USGS 1:250000 map of Bakersfield in California. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

Vintage 1948 USGS 1:250000 Map of Fresno in California. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).Vintage USGS - Fresno - 1948

Vintage 1948 USGS 1:250000 Map of Fresno in California. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

Vintage 1947 USGS 1:250000 Map of Mariposa in California. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).Vintage USGS - Mariposa - 1947

Vintage 1947 USGS 1:250000 Map of Mariposa in California. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails Map of Clayton Valley Dunes in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.Clayton Valley Dunes - OHV Trails

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails Map of Clayton Valley Dunes in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails Map of Esmeralda County in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.Esmeralda County - OHV Trails

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails Map of Esmeralda County in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails of North West Nye County in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.Nye County - North West OHV Trails

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails of North West Nye County in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails of North East Nye County in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.Nye County - North East OHV Trails

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails of North East Nye County in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails of Northern Nye County in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.Nye County - Northern OHV Trails

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails of Northern Nye County in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails Map of Mineral County in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.Mineral County - OHV Trails

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails Map of Mineral County in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails Map of Amargosa Big Dune in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.Amargosa Big Dune - OHV Map

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails Map of Amargosa Big Dune in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails Map of Bullfrog Historical Mining Course in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.Bullfrog - Historical Mining Course

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails Map of Bullfrog Historical Mining Course in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails Map of Beatty Area in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.Beatty Area - OHV Map

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails Map of Beatty Area in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails Map of Beatty to Goldfield Adventure Route in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.Beatty Area - Beatty to Goldfield Adventure Route

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails Map of Beatty to Goldfield Adventure Route in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails Map of Southern Nye County in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.Nye County - South OHV Trails

Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails Map of Southern Nye County in Nevada. Published by Nevada Off-Highway Vehicles Program.

Statewide Map of Nevada Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Nevada State - Surface Management Responsibility

Statewide Map of Nevada Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Official Highway Map of Nevada. Published by the Nevada Department of Transportation.Nevada State - Highway Map

Official Highway Map of Nevada. Published by the Nevada Department of Transportation.

brochures

Summer edition of the Visitor Guide for Death Valley National Park (NP) in Nevada and California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Death Valley - Guide Summer 2022

Summer edition of the Visitor Guide for Death Valley National Park (NP) in Nevada and California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/deva https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Death_Valley_National_Park Death Valley National Park straddles eastern California and Nevada. It’s known for Titus Canyon, with a ghost town and colorful rocks, and Badwater Basin’s salt flats, North America's lowest point. Above, Telescope Peak Trail weaves past pine trees. North of the spiky salt mounds known as the Devil’s Golf Course, rattlesnakes live in Mesquite Flat Sand Dunes. In this below-sea-level basin, steady drought and record summer heat make Death Valley a land of extremes. Yet, each extreme has a striking contrast. Towering peaks are frosted with winter snow. Rare rainstorms bring vast fields of wildflowers. Lush oases harbor tiny fish and refuge for wildlife and humans. Despite its morbid name, a great diversity of life thrives in Death Valley. There are multiple entrances to the park. Click below to learn the best ways to travel to Death Valley. Furnace Creek Visitor Center Furnace Creek Visitor Center is the central hub for all things Death Valley. Here you can pay the park entrance fee, speak with a ranger about trip plans or questions, participate in the Junior Ranger program, watch the 20-minute park film, explore museum displays, and browse the park bookstore. Las Vegas, NV - Blue Diamond NV160 west to Pahrump, NV. Left on Bell Vista/State Line Road to Death Valley Junction and then left on CA190 (west) into the park. Lone Pine, CA - Take CA 190 east into the park. Ridgecrest, CA - Head north toward Trona, CA on CA178 to CA190. Baker, CA - Take 127 North to CA178 or CA190 west (left). Beatty, NV - Take NV374 south/west into the park. Stovepipe Wells Ranger Station Stovepipe Wells Ranger Station offers a location to talk to a ranger and pay the park's entrance fee. The hours and days open are dependent on staffing. Emigrant Campground First come / first served tent only campground with no additional fee. Located next to CA 190 at 2100' feet in elevation. Emigrant campground overlooks the Cottonwood Mountains which is a part of the Panamint Range. This is a small campground with 10 sites southwest of Stovepipe Wells Ranger Station. A building with flush toilets is 270 feet down a dirt trail just outside of the campground. Emigrant Campground Camping Fee 0.00 Free. There is no cost to camp here. Please pay your park entry fee. Emigrant Campground Sample Site #1 Row of loose 12 inch rocks separate a flat, gravel area. Metal picnic bench on far side. Open views at the Emigrant tenting sites. Emigrant Campground Entrance Symbol for tent on a small brown sign on a post stands left of a dirt road. White clouds dot sky. Emigrant is a tent-only campground with 10 sites. Emigrant Campground Nearby Restroom Stone building next to 4 ft wide rock path then asphalt. Space in front wall is entrance.. Flush toilets are located just outside Emigrant Campground. Eureka Dunes Campground (Primitive) Remote campground at the base of Eureka Dunes (the tallest sand dunes in California and home to several endemic plant species). This campground is located at 2,880ft and is only accessible to high-clearance vehicles. Please drive only on existing roads and tread lightly on the dunes to protect this fragile and unique environment. Backcountry Campground 0.00 Park entry fee/pass required. No additional camping fee. Eureka Dunes Campground Desert campsite with picnic table, metal fire ring, view of tall sand dunes in the background Primitive campsite with view of sand dunes Eureka Dune Campground View of the valley, campsite, picnic table and pit toilet from the campground road. Primitive, unpaved roads lead to the Eureka Dunes Dry Camp. Eureka Dune Vault Toilet Vault toilet with sand dune in the background Eureka Dunes campground provides picnic tables, fire rings and a vault toilet Eureka Dunes Picnic Table Campsite with picnic table with sand dunes in the background Eureka Dunes provide a spectacular backdrop to this primitive campground. Furnace Creek Campground Located near Furnace Creek Visitor Center, Furnace Creek Campground is the only NPS campground in the park that accepts reservations and has sites with full RV hookups as well as dry RV and tent sites. Reservations can be made up to 6 months in advance for camping dates between 10/15 and 4/15; the remainder of the year the campground is first-come-first-serve. This is the most popular campground in the park and reservations are strongly recommended. RV/Tent Sites 22.00 Standard campsite. No more than eight people and two vehicles or one recreational vehicle per site. Larger groups wishing to camp together can reserve group sites at the Furnace Creek Campground. Full Hook-up Sites 36.00 RV/Tent site fee (half-price with Lifetime Pass) plus $14 Utility Fee (not discounted) Group Sites #3, 4, 5 35.00 9-15 people, up to 4 vehicles. No discount for Lifetime Pass. Group Sites #1 and #2 60.00 9-40 people, up to 10 vehicles. No discount for Lifetime Pass. Furnace Creek Campground kiosk a small building with a flagpole Rangers are available to take campground fees. Furnace Creek Campground a truck and camper on a paved site with sparse vegetation Sites are paved to accommodate level trailer parking. Furnace Creek Campground tents set up on gravel Tenting is permitted, and picnic tables and fire rings are provided. Furnace Creek Campground a campground with trailers and tents This campground offers moderate space between sites and occasional trees. Homestake Campground (Primitive) Extremely remote campsite at 3,785ft of elevation, accessible only by high-clearance vehicles with all-terrain tires. Access from Saline Valley Road requires navigating Lippincott Pass and should only be attempted by experienced 4-wheel drivers. There are no approved toilet facilities at this location and no water available. Pack in all that you need, pack out all that you bring. Camping Fee 0.00 Free (Death Valley entrance fee or Annual/Lifetime Pass required) Homestake Site 1 Homestake Site 1 unpaved road with tent spot Homestake is a small, primitive campground in a remote setting. Homestake Site 7 View of the mountains from unpaved road. Fire rings are provided at each campsite. The mountain view from the campground is spectacular. Homestake Site 8 View of the mountains from campground from parking area and tent site. The campground provides nearby access to the Racetrack playa in a spectacular setting. Group Site Homestake Large parking and tent area for groups with mountain view. Group camping is available for parties larger than 8 people at Homestake primitive campground. . Mahogany Flat Campground (Primitive) First come / first served primitive campground with no additional fee located in a Pinyon Pine and Juniper forest at 8,200' elevation. Great views down into Death Valley. Located near the Telescope Peak trailhead. Dirt road access requires high-clearance vehicles, often 4x4 required. Mahogany Flat Campground Fee 0.00 This primitive campground does not have a nightly fee. Mahogany Flat Campground Sign Pine trees surround wooden sign on wood posts reads Mahogany Flat Campground Elevation 8133 Feet. This higher elevation campsite is closed in the winter. Mahogany Flat Campground Sample Site #1 A flat dirt circular area about 25 ft across surrounded on 3 sides by tall evergreen trees. Sites are in a pinyon/juniper forest, with picnic tables and fire rings provided. Mahogany Flat Campground Sample Site #2 Dirt open area with scattered 1 ft boulders, metal picnic table, metal fire ring, & Evergreen trees. One of a handful of tent sites from which to choose. Views from Mahogany Flat To men stand on flat ground & point outward through pine trees to a valley below. Breaks in the trees provide views into the valley. More Views from the Campground Flat clear area slopes down to dense trees then white-floored desert valley & blue-tinged mountains. Sites on the east part of the camp have an amazing view of the valley floor. Mesquite Spring Campground First come / first served campground at an elevation of 1,800 feet, located 2 miles off of the Scotty’s Castle Road below Grapevine Canyon. It is a great base camp for your adventures in the northern parts of Death ValIey National Park. It is surrounded by desert mountains and geological features. Each site has a fire grate and picnic table. There are no hook-ups available. Fee is paid at the automatic pay station at the front of the campground. Mesquite Campground Fee - Senior/Access Rate 7.00 Reduced rate for Senior and Access pass holders. Pay fee using card at automated fee machine in the campground. Mesquite Campground Fee - Standard Rate 14.00 Standard Campsite Rate. Pay fee using card at automated fee machine in the campground. Mesquite Springs Sample Camp Site #1 Camper sits on dirt ground outside tent with bicycles nearby. A camper enjoys their time at Mesquite campground. Mesquite Springs Restrooms 2 doors with square concrete ground pads on red brick building. 1 reads Men, other is open. Two restroom buildings with flush toilets are available. Mesquite Springs Sample Site #2 Flat dirt & gravel clearing surrounded by small brown bushes has metal picnic table & fire ring. All sites have a picnic table and fire ring. Mesquite Springs Campground Sample Site #3 Row of small bushes separate road from site. BBQ, fire pit & table close together on dirt ground. A few sites have pole-mounted barbeques. Saline Valley Campground (Primitive) This is a clothing-optional hot spring area approximately 35 miles from the nearest paved road. A high-clearance vehicle and all-terrain tires are necessary to access this campground and road/weather conditions may necessitate 4-wheel drive. This campground is located at 1,375ft, but requires navigating either North Pass at 7,300ft or South Pass at 5,997ft and may be inaccessible due to winter conditions. Camping Fee 0.00 (Death Valley entrance fee or Annual/Lifetime Pass required) Saline Valley CG 1 Information Board at entrance to Campround Saline Valley Campground is primitive camping only, with limited infrastructure and facilities. Saline Valley CG 3 Vault Toilet with view of the mountains in the background Saline Valley CG is primitive camping only, with vault toilets and no running water. Saline Valley CG 4 Dirt road leading into camping area with mountains in the background Access to Saline Valley CG in via high clearance 4 x 4 roads Saline Valley CG 2 Warm springs pool with mountains in the background Saline Valley warm springs are located near the camping area Stovepipe Wells Campground Open seasonally starting October 15th at noon. First come, first served campground located at sea level. The Stovepipe Wells campground has views of Death Valley proper and of the Mesquite Flat Sand Dunes. It is adjacent to the Stovepipe Wells general store, ranger station, and a privately operated RV park. Fee is paid at the pay station at the front of the campground. Stovepipe Wells Camping - Standard Rate 14.00 Fee per campsite per night. Stovepipe Wells Camping - Senior & Access Rate 7.00 Fee is per campsite per night, for Senior and Access Pass holders. Stovepipe Wells Campground Restroom A rectangular building with mens and womens doors on opposite ends & a third door in center. Bathroom facilities at Stovepipe Wells Campground. Stovepipe Tent Area Wooden sign on post reads Tent Area Parking Only. Wood Gathering Prohibited. There is a tent only area in the northside of the campground. Stovepipe Wells Campground 4 metal picnic tables surround a metal fire ring on an open, gravel area. The group fire ring is only place wood fires are permitted in Stovepipe Wells Campground. Stovepipe Wells Campground At least 8 tents line up on a gravel surface surrounded by cars. Winter and Spring can lead to busy campgrounds. Views from Stovepipe Wells Campground Large mountains in the distance fill the background of an open, gravel lot with 2 RVs. The Stovepipe Wells Campground is in an open area with views of the surrounding mountains. Sunset Campground Open seasonally starting October 15th at noon. First come, first served, large campground that rarely fills. This location has little to no vegetation and is comprised of desert gravels. Car and tent camping is permitted however each site DOES NOT offer a firegrate or picnic table. Campfires are not allowed in Sunset except at a few designated public areas within the campground. Fee is paid at the pay station in the campground. Sunset Campground Camping 14.00 Pay fee using card at automated fee machine in the campground. You may also head across the highway to the park visitor center to pay. Sunset Campground Camping - Senior/Access Rate 7.00 Reduced rate of $7 for valid Senior & Access pass holders. Pay fee using card at automated fee machine in the campground. You may also head across the highway to the park visitor center to pay by card, cash, or check. Sunset Campground Overview a long distance view of RVs and trailers in a gravel area with distant mountains Sunset Campground is in a flat alluvial area with distant views of mountains. Sunset Campground Street View a roadway through gravel with RVs parked at spots marked by cement curbs Sunset Campground is in a flat alluvial area with distant views of mountains. Texas Springs Campground Open seasonally starting October 15th at noon. First come, first served campground located in the hills above Furnace Creek. Great views and some trees. No generators allowed. Each site has a firegrate and picnic table. Fee is paid at pay station at the front of the campground. Texas Spring Camping 16.00 Camping fee per night at Texas Spring Campground Texas Spring overlooking a valley with a few green trees surrounded by mountains The spring which gives the campground its name is a short walk away. Texas Spring restrooms a stone building with red roof tiles Historic restrooms at the Texas Spring campground. Thorndike Campground (Primitive) First come / first served primitive, forested campground with no additional fee located at 7,400' elevation. Accessible to high clearance vehicles (no longer than 25'), and 4x4 may be necessary. Thorndike Campground 0.00 This primitive campground does not have a nightly fee. Thorndike CG Entrance Sign 2' metal tent sign on top of small wood horizontal sign on a post reads, Thorndike Campground. Entrance Sign for Thorndike Campground Thorndike CG Sample Site 30' diameter flat space with a metal picnic table surrounded by tall trees.. Most sites include space for tent, fire ring, and metal picnic table. Thorndike CP Sample Site with Tent Orange 2-person tent set-up on flat dirt space set back between 2 tall trees. All sites are spacious and surrounded by tall trees. Thorndike Campground 4 stone steps lead from road to flat dirt area surrounded by small shrubs & trees. This primitive campground is within a pinyon pine and juniper forest. Thorndike Campground Large flat dirt area with a metal table in the center densely surrounded by tall trees. Most campsites offer a mixture of shade and sun. Wildrose Campground First come / first served campground with no additional fee high in the Panamint Mountains. Located at an elevation of 4100 ft / 1250 meters. No hook-ups available. Generators allowed 7am - 7pm. This area is prone to high winds. Sites are dirt and gravel surrounded by Mesquite bushes and rolling hills. Wildrose Camping Fee 0.00 Wildrose Campground is a free. Please pay your park entry fee to show your support of the park. Wildrose Information Board Eye level bulletin board stands on 2 wood posts. Wood box with hinged top opening attached to side. Check out the information board next to site #2 for updated campground information. Wildrose Campground Sample Site #1 Metal picnic table & metal fire ring on flat dirt clearing lined in the back by small dried bushes. A table and fire ring are included at each site at Wildrose. Wildrose Tents Only Loop A wooden sign on a wood post reads tents only. Dried bushes extend behind sign right of open area. Spaces 14 - 23 are for tents only. Wildrose Campground Sample Site #2 Dirt & gravel area is flat on the west with a gradual incline on the east side. Two tent sites rise above the rest of the campground on the hillside. View from Wildrose Campground Large flat, packed dirt & gravel area with dispersed small bushes. One hill covers background. All sites are on a plateau surrounded by rolling hills and Mesquite bushes. Sunset from Zabriskie Point badlands bathed in pale pink and orange light from the setting sun The warm light of sunset covers the badlands at Zabriskie Point. Zabriskie Point Morning light on the badlands below Zabriskie Point. Zabriskie Point is a popular place to view sunrise over the badlands. Storm over the Salt Flats white salt flats with dark gray clouds Badwater Basin is the lowest point in North America at -282 feet. Sunset at Dantes View a sunset overlooking a valley filled with white salt A mile above the salt flats in the valley below, Dantes View provides breathtaking vistas. Lupine and Tortoiseshell Butterfly pink lupine flowers with an orange and black butterfly Higher elevations provide a respite from the heat in this alpine ecosystem. Wildrose Charcoal Kilns nine 25 foot tall rock beehive structures Nearly a century and a half old, these are some of the best preserved kilns in the western U.S. A rare superbloom of Desert Gold. a field of yellow flowers with a mountain About once a decade, rains at the right times can lead to a rare superbloom! Hottest Place on Earth thermometer reading 130 f 54 c Summers are infamously hot, as for 6 months of the year temperatures above 120 degrees are regularly recorded. Winding canyons await polished walls of a narrow canyon There are numerous canyons to explore across this vast park. 2014 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2014 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Partnerships add a Charge to your Travel Plans The National Park Service, the National Park Foundation, BMW of North America, the U.S. Department of Energy, concessioners, and gateway communities have collaborated to provide new technologies for travel options to and around national parks. As part of this public-private partnership, BMW of North America, working through the National Park Foundation, donated and arranged for the installation of 100 electric vehicle (EV) charging ports in and around national parks. Star Wars in Death Valley Star Wars in Death Valley? Learn about how you can visit Tatooine! A park ranger stands in the desert next to a gold robot. Desert Bighorn Sheep: Living Life on the Edge Desert bighorn sheep are true survivors who live on rugged land with few resources. Despite being well adapted to harsh desert terrain, bighorn sheep are vulnerable to climate change, habitat fragmentation, disease and other outside threats. Learn about these regal animals, and the role you can play in helping them survive. A desert bighorn sheep stands on the edge of a rock, looking down. Started from the Bottom: A Mission from Death Valley to Denali on Horseback In 1958, Stanley Upton of Riverside, California hatched an ambitious plan. He was determined to trek from the lowest point in North America, in Death Valley, to the highest point on Denali’s summit. On Location: An Introduction to Film in National Parks National parks have provided the backdrop for many iconic American films, including the original "Star Wars" trilogy at Death Valley National Park, "Thelma and Louise" at Canyonlands National Park, and many more. Filmmakers have been recording at National Park Service sites since the early years of motion picture history. While the location might not be the first thing in the credits, these films and television shows shine a spotlight on park landscapes. A uniformed ranger shakes hands with C3PO, a Star Wars character, in a bare and hilly landscape. PARKS...IN...SPAAAACE!!! NASA astronauts have quite literally an out-of-this-world view of national parks and take some pretty stellar pictures to share. Travel along with the space station on its journey west to east getting the extreme bird’s eye view of national parks across the country. And one more down-to-earth. View of Denali National Park & Preserve from space Beyond the Surface: National Recognition of the California Desert This year marks the 25th anniversary of Death Valley National Park and the California Desert Protection Act, signed into law by Bill Clinton on October 31, 1994. The Act converted Death Valley and Joshua Tree National Monuments into National Parks, added more land to both sites, and established the 1.6 million-acre Mojave National Preserve. It was unprecedented, setting aside over nine million acres of Wilderness. Learn more about the CA deserts' history. A twisted, multi-branched tree, with tufts of vegetation, set against a setting sun. World War II Plane Crashes in National Parks During WWII, more than 7,100 air crashes involved US Army Air Force (USAAF) aircraft occurred on American soil. Collectively these crashes resulted in the loss of more than 15,599 lives (Mireles 2006). Many of these military aircraft accidents occurred in remote, often mountainous, areas managed by the National Park Service. plane crash at base of grassy hill NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Death Valley National Park, California and Nevada Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] desert landscape with flowers in bloom 2002 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2002 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Death Valley's Moving Rocks Explore the mystery of the moving rocks of Death Valley's Racetrack. Boulders leave a mysterious trail in the surface of a dry lakebed How Lake Mead Stopped a Potent Invasive Plant Infestation Fountaingrass (Pennisetum setaceum) is an invasive ornamental species planted in several areas of the Southwest. When the staff at Lake Mead discovered the plant near remote mountain springs 12 miles upriver from the original plantings the Lake Mead Invasive Plant Management Team (LAKE IPMT) knew they had to hurry to prevent a dangerous fountaingrass infestation. Travis Fulton, LAKE IPMT, controlling fountain grass on a hillside at Joshua Tree National Park. Viva DEVA: A Valley of Death, Full of Life During 2017, paleontology intern Matthew Ferlicchi expanded our understanding of the expansive fossil record at Death Valley National Park. Matthew's backcountry hiking skills enabled him to venture to several remote fossil localities in the park which led to new discoveries. Two of the discoveries has generated interest by two teams of paleontologists to initiate paleontological research at Death Valley National Park. ammonite fossils The Adverse Effects of Climate Change on Desert Bighorn Sheep Climate change has and will continue to have a negative impact on the population of desert bighorn sheep. For the remaining herds to survive, management may always be necessary. Protecting wild lands is key to the survival of these amazing animals. Desert bighorn sheep, NPS/Shawn Cigrand Ancient Springs Reveal a Pleistocene Vertebrate Fauna and a 100,000 Year Record of Paleoclimate in Death Valley National Park Recent investigation of the Rogers beds of Death Valley National Park, California, have uncovered abundant bones of late Pleistocene animals. Study of the beds themselves show that they are ancient spring-fed wetlands deposits, like those seen elsewhere in the Southwest, and tie into the Mojave Desert record of regional climate cycles. fossils and rocks on the ground with two people and a mountain in the distance Desert Bighorn Sheep: Connecting a Desert Landscape Desert bighorn sheep live on islands of mountain habitat and use surrounding desert for travel and food. These same desert areas contain a variety of human-made barriers that threaten the area’s individual bighorn herds. Researchers are collecting data that will provide telling information about how we can help support and protect bighorn populations across the Mojave Desert into the future. Up close bighorn sheep standing on top of a large rock. National Park Service Commemoration of the 19th Amendment In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the passing of the 19th Amendment the National Park Service has developed a number of special programs. This includes online content, exhibits, and special events. The National Park Service’s Cultural Resources Geographic Information Systems (CRGIS) announces the release of a story map that highlights some of these programs and provides information for the public to locate and participate. Opening slide of the 19th Amendment NPS Commemoration Story Map Lower Vine Ranch Cultural Landscape The Death Valley Scotty Historic District is an area of regional significance in the fields of 20th century architecture, folklore and social history, and of local significance in the fields of archeology, art and invention. Lower Vine Ranch served as the residence for Death Valley Scotty (Walter Scott), one of the best known and most colorful figures produced by the American mining frontier, between 1930 and 1952. Ranch house Thomason/Barker Ranch Cultural Landscape The Thomason/Barker Ranch cultural landscape, in Death Valley National Park, is located in the southern Panamint Range in the southwestern portion of the park. Although the property is historically and currently referred to as a “ranch,” it should more accurately be described as a single-family primitive retirement retreat, or "primitive recreational ranch." It embodies the pattern of settlement and activity identified with this region from the 1930s-1950s. A single-story dwelling of stone and wood construction in a dry landscape with low shrubs. Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display at a visitor center Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Series: Park Paleontology News - Vol. 12, No. 2, Fall 2020 All across the park system, scientists, rangers, and interpreters are engaged in the important work of studying, protecting, and sharing our rich fossil heritage. <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/newsletters.htm">Park Paleontology news</a> provides a close up look at the important work of caring for these irreplaceable resources. <ul><li>Contribute to Park Paleontology News by contacting the <a href="https://www.nps.gov/common/utilities/sendmail/sendemail.cfm?o=5D8CD5B898DDBB8387BA1DBBFD02A8AE4FBD489F4FF88B9049&r=/subjects/geoscientistsinparks/photo-galleries.htm">newsletter editor</a></li><li>Learn more about <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/">Fossils & Paleontology</a> </li><li>Celebrate <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossilday/">National Fossil Day</a> with events across the nation</li></ul> fossils on the ground with two people and a mountain in the distance Series: NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Since 2002, the National Park Service (NPS) has awarded Environmental Achievement (EA) Awards to recognize staff and partners in the area of environmental preservation, protection and stewardship. A vehicle charges at an Electric Vehicle charging station at Thomas Edison National Historical Park Series: Denali History Nuggets Little-known episodes from Denali's history! a large dog pulling a woman on a sled Series: Park Paleontology News - Vol. 09, No. 2, Fall 2017 All across the park system, scientists, rangers, and interpreters are engaged in the important work of studying, protecting, and sharing our rich fossil heritage. <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/newsletters.htm">Park Paleontology news</a> provides a close up look at the important work of caring for these irreplaceable resources. <ul><li>Contribute to Park Paleontology News by contacting the <a href="https://www.nps.gov/common/utilities/sendmail/sendemail.cfm?o=5D8CD5B898DDBB8387BA1DBBFD02A8AE4FBD489F4FF88B9049&r=/subjects/geoscientistsinparks/photo-galleries.htm">newsletter editor</a></li><li>Learn more about <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/">Fossils & Paleontology</a> </li><li>Celebrate <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossilday/">National Fossil Day</a> with events across the nation</li></ul> skull on the lawn at the national mall Permian Period—298.9 to 251.9 MYA The massive cliffs of El Capitan in Guadalupe Mountains National Park represent a Permian-age reef along the supercontinent Pangaea. The uppermost rocks of Grand Canyon National Park are also Permian. flat-top mountain Pennsylvanian Period—323.2 to 298.9 MYA Rocks in Cumberland Gap National Historical Park represent vast Pennsylvanian-age swamps. Plant life in those swamps later became coal found in the eastern United States. fossil tracks on sandstone slab Mississippian Period—358.9 to 323.2 MYA The extensive caves of Mammoth Cave and Wind Cave national parks developed in limestone deposited during the Mississippian. Warm, shallow seas covered much of North America, which was close to the equator. fossil crinoid Devonian Period—419.2 to 358.9 MYA The Devonian is part of the “Age of Fishes.” Fish fossils from Death Valley National Park shed light on the early evolution of fish in North America. Tilted Devonian rocks in Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park attest to continued Appalachian Mountain formation. fossil brachiopod Cambrian Period—541 to 485.4 MYA The flat layers of rock exposed in Grand Canyon National Park encompass much of the Paleozoic, beginning in the Cambrian where they record an ancient shoreline. rock with fossil burrow tracks Silurian Period—443.8 to 419.2 MYA Excellent exposures and well-preserved fossils in Silurian rocks of Glacier Bay National Park & Preserve provide clues to the timing of the assembly of Alaska’s assembly from a variety of continental fragments. fossil corals in a rock matrix The Precambrian The Precambrian was the "Age of Early Life." During the Precambrian, continents formed and our modern atmosphere developed, while early life evolved and flourished. Soft-bodied creatures like worms and jellyfish lived in the world's oceans, but the land remained barren. Common Precambrian fossils include stromatolites and similar structures, which are traces of mats of algae-like microorganisms, and microfossils of other microorganisms. fossil stromatolites in a cliff face Proterozoic Eon—2.5 Billion to 541 MYA The Proterozoic Eon is the most recent division of the Precambrian. It is also the longest geologic eon, beginning 2.5 billion years ago and ending 541 million years ago fossil stromatolites in a cliff face Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Neogene Period—23.0 to 2.58 MYA Some of the finest Neogene fossils on the planet are found in the rocks of Agate Fossil Beds and Hagerman Fossil Beds national monuments. fossils on display in a visitor center Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display in a visitor center Series: Pacific Ocean Education Team (POET) Newsletters From 2009 to 2015, the Pacific Ocean Education Team published a series of short newsletters about the health of the ocean at various National Park Service sites in and around the Pacific Ocean. Topics covered included the 2010 tsunami, marine debris, sea star wasting disease, ocean acidification, and more. Ocean waves wash in from the right onto a forested and rocky shoreline. POET Newsletter Summer 2010 Pacific Ocean Education Team (POET) newsletter from Winter 2009. Articles include: Stewardship Without Boundaries: Conserving Our Ocean Ecosystem from Baja to the Bering Sea; A Seamless Network of Parks, Sanctuaries, Refuges & Reserves; Life Entwined with the Sea: The Non-Coastal Park Connection; Take the Plunge into Ocean Stewardship; Nearshore Vertebrates in Four Hawaii Parks; and Ocean Stewardship: A Commitment to Collaboration. Sea stacks rise above ocean waves washing ashore. A wooded ridge rises in the distance. POET Newsletter Winter 2009 Pacific Ocean Education Team (POET) newsletter from Winter 2009. Articles include: Stewardship Without Boundaries: Conserving Our Ocean Ecosystem from Baja to the Bering Sea; A Seamless Network of Parks, Sanctuaries, Refuges & Reserves; Life Entwined with the Sea: The Non-Coastal Park Connection; Engage Visitors in Ocean Park Stewardship; Inventory Map & Protect Ocean Parks; and Ocean Stewardship: A Commitment to Collaboration for Conservation. A color map indicating the depth of the Pacific Ocean floor. Darker blue represents deeper oceans. Fossil Footprints Across Our Parks / Huellas Fósiles a Través de Nuestros Parques Join us on a virtual hike to see fossil footprints across our national parks! As we travel back in time, we’ll discover stories of fantastic pasts and learn that fossil footprints are worthy of protection for the future. <br><br> ¡Únase a nosotros en una caminata para ver huellas fósiles en nuestros parques nacionales! Mientras viajamos a través del tiempo, descubriremos historias de pasados fantásticos y aprenderemos que las huellas fósiles merecen ser conservadas para el futuro. Two primitive tetrapods, looking something like giant lizards walking through desert sand dunes. Series: Volcanic Eruption Types The most fundamental way to characterize a volcanic eruption is whether it is magmatic, phreatic, or phreatomagmatic. volcanic eruption seen at a distance Phreatomagmatic (Hydrovolcanic) Eruptions Phreatomagmatic eruptions include fresh lava or tephra, but also include violent steam explosions caused by the interaction of hot magma or lava with water. volcanic eruption Volcanic Craters Craters are present at many volcanic vents. The size and shape of volcanic craters vary a great deal from volcano to volcano, and they even change during the lifespan of an active volcano. Craters can become filled by lava domes or lava flows, and new craters may form during subsequent eruptions. cinder cone crater Find Your Park on Route 66 Route 66 and the National Park Service have always had an important historical connection. Route 66 was known as the great road west and after World War II families on vacation took to the road in great numbers to visit the many National Park Service sites in the Southwest and beyond. That connection remains very alive and present today. Take a trip down Route 66 and Find Your Park today! A paved road with fields in the distance. On the road is a white Oklahoma Route 66 emblem. Maars and Tuff Rings Maars and tuff rings are low-standing pyroclastic cones with large craters that usually form from highly-explosive eruptions caused by the interaction of magma with ground or surface waters. Ubehebe Crater in Death Valley National Park is a maar. lakeshore and tundra Christmas on the Emigrant Trails: Christmas 1849 at Death Valley, California The Rev. James W. Brier, a Methodist preacher from Ohio, wanted to reach the California gold fields in the worst way, so that’s exactly what he did. He chose the very worst way imaginable: a “shortcut” across the untracked badlands of southern Nevada. Black and white engraving of a line of people and livestock marching single file . Changing Patterns of Water Availability May Change Vegetation Composition in US National Parks Across the US, changes in water availability are altering which plants grow where. These changes are evident at a broad scale. But not all areas experience the same climate in the same way, even within the boundaries of a single national park. A new dataset gives park managers a valuable tool for understanding why vegetation has changed and how it might change in the future under different climate-change scenarios. Green, orange, and dead grey junipers in red soil, mountains in background Dare to Imagine: Christina Aiello Read about Christina's work with desert bighorn sheep and paving her own path. This article is part of a National Park Foundation funded project called the Dare to Imagine project dedicated to highlighting women in parks who are breaking barriers and showing what a scientist looks like. graphic of a photo of a woman in the field. Text reads Christina Aiello NPF Foundation Women in Landscape-Scale Conservation: Christina Aiello Christina Aiello works a lot with corridor connectivity for desert bighorn sheep, but she explains that no matter what your skillset is, you can contribute to landscape-scale conservation. close up of woman standing in desert Petra “Maggie Moore” Romero Petra Romero was born in Mexico around 1838 and joined the global migration to the North American West. Re-naming herself “Maggie Moore,” she became the owner and operator of a dance hall in Death Valley called Waterfall Dance House or “Madam Moore’s.” Cinder Cones Cinder cones are typically simple volcanoes that consist of accumulations of ash and cinders around a vent. Sunset Crater Volcano and Capulin Volcano are cinder cones. photo of a dry grassy field with a cinder cone in the distance Series: Volcanic Features Volcanoes vary greatly in size and shape. Volcanoes also may have a variety of other features, which in turn, have a great range in diversity of form, size, shape, and permanence. Many volcanoes have craters at their summits and/or at the location of other vents. Some craters contain water lakes. Lakes of molten or solidified lava may exist on some volcanoes. Fumaroles and other geothermal features are a product of heat from magma reservoirs and volcanic gases. photo of a lava lake in a summit crater Series: Volcano Types Volcanoes vary in size from small cinder cones that stand only a few hundred feet tall to the most massive mountains on earth. photo of a volcanic mountain with snow and ice Monogenetic Volcanic Fields Monogenetic volcanic fields are areas covered by volcanic rocks where each of the volcanic vents typically only erupt once. Monogenetic volcanic fields typically contain cinder cones, fissure volcanoes, and/or maars and tuff rings. They also usually encompass large areas covered by basaltic lava flows. oblique aerial photo of a lava flow that extended into a body of water Pyroclastic Flows and Ignimbrites, and Pyroclastic Surges Pyroclastic flows and surges are among the most awesome and most destructive of all volcanic phenomena. Pyroclastic flow deposits are found in at least 21 units of the National Park System. photo of a cloud of ash and dust moving down a mountain side. Studying the Past and Predicting the Future Using Rat Nests In the western United States, packrat middens are one of the best tools for reconstructing recent environments and climates. These accumulations of plant fragments, small vertebrate remains, rodent droppings, and other fossils can be preserved for more than 50,000 years. Packrat middens have been found in at least 41 National Park Service units. Photo of a wood rat. Series: Park Paleontology News - Vol. 14, No. 2, Fall 2022 All across the park system, scientists, rangers, and interpreters are engaged in the important work of studying, protecting, and sharing our rich fossil heritage. <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/newsletters.htm">Park Paleontology news</a> provides a close up look at the important work of caring for these irreplaceable resources. <ul><li>Contribute to Park Paleontology News by contacting the <a href="https://www.nps.gov/common/utilities/sendmail/sendemail.cfm?o=5D8CD5B898DDBB8387BA1DBBFD02A8AE4FBD489F4FF88B9049&r=/subjects/geoscientistsinparks/photo-galleries.htm">newsletter editor</a></li><li>Learn more about <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/">Fossils & Paleontology</a> </li><li>Celebrate <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossilday/">National Fossil Day</a> with events across the nation</li></ul> Photo of a person sitting while using a laboratory microscope. Series: Geologic Time—Major Divisions and NPS Fossils The National Park System contains a magnificent record of geologic time because rocks from each period of the geologic time scale are preserved in park landscapes. The geologic time scale is divided into four large periods of time—the Cenozoic Era, Mesozoic Era, Paleozoic Era, and The Precambrian. photo of desert landscape with a petrified wood log on the surface Series: Women's History in the Pacific West - Lower Colorado Basin Collection Biographies of women in parks from southern California, southern Nevada, and northwest Arizona Map of southern California, southern Nevada and northwest Arizona Guide to the Henry G. Peabody Photograph Collection Finding aid for the Henry G. Peabody Collection Guide to the Thomas J. Allen Photograph Collection Finding aid for the Thomas J. Allen Photographs in the NPS History Collection. 50 Nifty Finds #5: Keeping Their Cool The park ranger uniform is known the world over. Perhaps the most iconic part of the uniform is the broad-brimmed flat hat. Over the last century, however, many different kinds of hats have been worn by rangers depending on their gender, where they work, the season of the year, and the jobs they do. While a pith helmet may bring up images of Colonial Britain, World War II soldiers, explorers, or people on safaris, for a while it was also be worn by some park rangers. Tan pith helmet with a silver Sequoia cone on the front 50 Nifty Finds #18: Portable Posters Many visitors to national parks today collect passport stamps, magnets, or other items to recall their trip and to show others where they’ve been. In the 1920s and 1930s the “must have” souvenirs weren’t created to be collected. National Park Service (NPS) windshield stickers served a practical administrative purpose; they were evidence that the automobile license fee drivers paid at some parks had been paid. Even so, Americans embraced their colorful, artistic designs. Four colorful Rocky Mountain National Park windshield stickers. Incarcerated Japanese Americans at Death Valley A lesser-known part of Japanese American history took place right here in Death Valley National Park where the government moved 60 people from the incarceration camp at Manzanar – about 100 miles west – into the abandoned Civilian Conservation Crew (CCC) camp at Cow Creek. Women and children on the steps of a makeshift infirmary. 50 Nifty Finds #24: Fire Away! In the 1930s the National Park Service (NPS) fire suppression policy received a boost from Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) funding. CCC enrollees built roads, fire breaks, fire trails, lookouts, and other infrastructure in national parks across the country. At the same time, another significant effort was underway to improve how quickly forest fires could be detected and suppressed. The tool used to accomplish this was a camera—a very special camera. Man in a tree with a camera on a tripod Testing Treatments for Mitigating Climate-Change Effects on Adobe Structures in the National Parks In the US Southwest, climate change is making it harder to preserve historic adobe structures for future generations. Using adobe test walls and rainshower simulators, staff at the Desert Research Learning Center are evaluating the potential for increased erosion, and testing the effectiveness of different treatments methods to protect against it. The results will help park managers tailor their preservation methods to better protect culturally valuable resources. American flag viewed through the remains of an adobe doorway. A Changing Bimodal Climate Zone Means Changing Vegetation in Western National Parks When the climate changes enough, the vegetation communities growing in any given place will also change. Under an expanded bimodal climate zone, some plant communities in western national parks are more likely to change than others. National Park Service ecologists and partners investigated the future conditions that may force some of this change. Having this information can help park managers decide whether to resist, direct, or accept the change. Dark storm clouds and rainbow over mountains and saguaros. Bats Are in Danger. Here’s How and Why We’re Helping Them. Bats are amazing animals and a formidable force against insect pests, but a nasty fungal disease is killing them. A coordinated national response brings hope. GIF of a bat with big ears in a gloved hand, rotating its head and opening and closing its mouth. 50 Nifty Finds #34: Poster Boy for Parks Photographer Ansel Adams is renowned for his black-and-white images of western American landscapes. His name conjures iconic images of national parks, particularly his beloved Yosemite. Although his 1941 mural project for the US Department of the Interior (DOI) is better known, Adams also worked with the National Park Service (NPS) to create a series of six posters. These affordable versions of Adams’ art provided priceless publicity for national parks. Black and white national parks usa poster featuring cliff dwelling I Didn't Know That!: Biological Soil Crusts You’ve heard people say to stay on the trail, but what does it matter in the desert? It’s just dirt... right? Wrong—it's alive! Discover what biological soil crusts are and why they're so important in dry environments. a promo image for "I Didn't Know That! Biological Soil Crusts" with image of a biological soil crust Imagine a Museum Behind Barbed Wire Under the watchful eyes of military police, visitors marvel at desert flora, minerals, insect specimens, and other local objects on display. A visual library with approximately four thousand pictures, models, slides, and diagrams adds to the attraction. Outside the museum, children play at a small zoo complete with local fauna, picnic tables, and a barbeque pit. Five individuals standing outside a wooden building with steps made of wood boards. The Oasis Newsletter: Fall 2022 This biannual newsletter of the Mojave Desert Network Inventory and Monitoring Program features: an update column from Allen Calvert, Network Program Manager; highlights from our first in-person science symposium in three years; a new project brief on selected large springs monitoring; outreach efforts in parks; and a variety of staffing updates. Four field staff smile in a selfie after finishing their last monitoring plot. The Oasis Newsletter: Fall 2023 This biannual newsletter of the Mojave Desert Network Inventory and Monitoring Program features: an intern's summary of her experience working with our vegetation crew; two recent web publications on a nation-wide effort to conserve bats and monitoring vital signs in times of rapid change; outreach to MOJN park web managers to assist in increasing science and research content on their sites; and a variety of staffing updates. Woman with brimmed hat bends down to place a 3-foot tall blue flag along a transect in sagebrush. The Oasis Newsletter: Spring 2021 The Spring 2021 issue of the Mojave Desert Network newsletter bids farewell to our Ecologist and welcomes an Interim Ecologist and three field scientists hired this winter to support our monitoring projects. The newsletter also highlights recent outreach activities and collaborations with park staff, as well as a new project brief and a web article. We feature an article about the Dome Fire that killed an estimated 1.3 million Joshua trees in Mojave National Preserve. National Park Service scientist kneels on soil and filters a water sample from a desert spring. The Oasis Newsletter: Spring 2022 In this newsletter, you will find our recent project summary on Desert Springs monitoring, staffing updates, highiights and links for an Inventory and Monitoring Division Scientists' training, a feature on fossil monitoring in Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument, and our spring and summer field schedule. Two scientists use a leveling rod and a digital level to read water channel elevation. The Oasis Newsletter: Fall 2021 The Fall 2021 issue of the Mojave Desert Network newsletter highlights the recent "inconclusive" detection of a fungus causing bat disease; provides monitoring project updates and schedules; highlights recent project briefs and a data release report; features the network's first virtual science symposium; and summarizes staffing changes. Hiker walks on trail through golden aspen trees. The Oasis Newsletter: Spring 2023 This biannual newsletter of the Mojave Desert Network Inventory and Monitoring Program features: updates from regional Inventory & Monitoring Program Managers' meeting, satellite vegetation analysis and bird diversity in Joshua Tree National Park, staffing changes, our spring monitoring schedule, and a few images highlighting recent fieldwork. Woman stands in desert springs vegetation, stretching a meter tape out to monitor it. Monitoring Vital Signs in Times of Rapid Change Environmental changes are occurring at increasing rates over the last century in the Mojave Desert. Examples include rising temperature, decreasing precipitation, and more frequent extreme events like wildfire and flooding. Learn more about what we are monitoring in the Mojave Desert Network parks, some early changes we are seeing, and how what we are learning can be used to help managers plan for the future. Two scientists stand over a small spring amidst desert shrubs in Death Valley National Park. Desert Varnish Ever wondered what those dark lines were on the rock walls of canyon country? These black, brown, and red streaks are called desert varnish. streaks of black desert varnish on a red rock wall The Oasis Newsletter: Spring 2024 This issue of The Oasis newsletter highlights an upcoming Fall science symposium, a newly published Desert Springs Data Package and Quality Control Summary, a Yuma myotis bat web article, staff arrivals and departures, a first impressions article from Scientists in Parks intern Sofia Elizarraras, good-bye articles from Alison Gause and Avery Sigarroa, our spring and summer monitoring schedule, a new Inventory & Monitoring web page for Lake Mead NRA, and a new logo! Four people hike upslope amidst cacti and a rocky desert landscape. Updated Species Database Will Help Boost Amphibian Conservation Across the National Park Service To steward amphibians effectively, managers need basic information about which species live in parks. But species lists need constant maintenance to remain accurate. Due to recent efforts, the National Park Service now has an up-to-date amphibian species checklist for almost 300 parks. This information can serve as the basis for innumerable conservation efforts across the nation. A toad sits on red sand, looking into the camera. Timbisha Shoshone Demonstration National parks are often thought of as America’s best idea: to preserve uninhabited, pristine wilderness. This 1996 Timbisha Shoshone demonstration belies this vision. Death Valley National Park sits on their homeland. Decades before the park was created, women elders waged a campaign against an NPS eviction policy and demanded their homeland restored, forcing us to confront that America’s “best idea” was only possible by taking the ancestral homelands of Native Americans. Group marching in street with sign stating Furnace Creek and Cow Creek Water and Wastewater to be Rehabilitated through GAOA Funding This project will rehabilitate, replace, and upgrade various components of the water and wastewater system in the Furnace Creek and Cow Creek areas. A white machine dumps dirt into a trench.
Summer Visitor Guide E. LETTERMAN Death Valley National Park Wind ripples in the sand Welcome to Your Death Valley Adventure In a park as large as Death Valley, planning a trip can be overwhelming; now there's an app for that (for free)! Trip planning information is built into this printed visitor guide, but for those who prefer location-based digital experiences and self-guided audio tours, this app offers even more opportunities! The app covers all National Park Service sites, with specific Death Valley information written by expert rangers at the park. Features on the app include: • What to see • Things to do • Lodging and camping options • Hiking trails • Sunrise/sunset locations • Audio guided tours • Night sky viewing With limited internet and phone service available around the park, we recommend saving the Death Valley information for "Offline Use" so that location-based app features will work while you are visiting. Hottest, Lowest, Driest Death Valley National Park is the hottest place on Earth, with a recorded high temperature of 134°F (57°C) on July 10, 1913, and Badwater Basin is the lowest elevation in North America (282 feet/86 m below sea level)! These conditions combine to make Death Valley a land of extremes, where the powerful heat is a force of nature, and the air dries everything it contacts. June-August of 2021 tied with 2018 for the warmest summer on record at Furnace Creek with a 24-hour average temperature of 104.2°F (40.1°C). June 2021 was the park's warmest June ever recorded with an average temperature of 102.8 °F (39.3 °C). More Inside... Entrance Fees and Passes������������������2 Safety & Rules�����������������������������������3 Things to See������������������������������������4 Park Map������������������������������������������5 Average Temperatures�����������������������6 Death Valley is not only hot, it is also dry. On average, the park only receives 2.2 inches (56 mm) of rain a year. However, 1.45 inches (37 mm) fell at Furnace Creek in July 2021, making it the wettest July on record and resulting in washouts and flooding across many roads in the park. With extreme weather to be expected in Death Valley during the summer, it is critical to plan ahead in order to have a safe and enjoyable trip. Detailed safety information can be found on page 3. Whether auto touring with the air conditioning on, or walking at higher elevations of the park, visiting in the summer is all about staying cool! Junior Ranger Program Free Junior Ranger books are available at the Furnace Creek Visitor Center or can be downloaded from our website. Learn about the park and complete activities to earn a badge! Sunrise & Sunset Locations����������������7 Experiencing Night Skies�������������������7 Partnerships��������������������������������������8 Visitor Services ���������������������������������8 Camping�������������������������������������������8 NPS PHOTO Explore the Park With the NPS App! Death Valley National Park National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Parks are Living Museums Quick Facts • Size: 3,422,024 acres • Establishment: February 11, 1933 Death Valley National Monument was established, protecting nearly 2 million acres� • Redesignation: October 31, 1994 Another 1�3 million acres were added and the area was redesignated as Death Valley National Park� Park Mailing Address Death Valley National Park PO Box 579 Death Valley, CA 92328 Email deva_information@nps�gov Phone 760-786-3200 Website www.nps.gov/deva Social Media Facebook.com/DeathValleyNPS Instagram.com/DeathValleyNPS EXPERIENCE YOUR AMERICA™ Entrance Fee Required Pay your entrance fee at a visitor center or at one of the automated fee machines in the park� Annual and lifetime passes cover this fee� U�S� Veterans and Gold Star families are eligible for free entry� Show your pass and identification at a visitor center to receive an entrance tag, park map and trip planning guide� Display your entrance tag on your vehicle dash while visiting� 7-day Passes Private Vehicle�������������������������������������$30 Motorcycle������������������������������������������$25 Individual entering on bicycle or foot���$15 Annual and Lifetime Passes Interagency Annual Pass���������������������$80 Death Valley Annual Pass��������������������$55 Interagency Lifetime Senior Pass����������$80 (U.S. citizens aged 62+) Interagency Annual Senior Pass�����������$20 (U.S. citizens aged 62+) Interagency Annual Military Pass������� Free (active duty U.S. Military and dependents, Veterans and Gold Star families) Interagency Access Pass�������������������� Free (permanently disabled U.S. citizens) E. LETTERMAN The National Park Service was established on August 25, 1916, "��� to conserve the scenery and the natural and historic objects and the wild life [���] and to provide for the enjoyment of the same in such manner and by such means as will leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of future generations�”

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