"Anacostia River Trail" by NPS photo: M.Marquez , public domain

Anacostia

Park - District of Columbia

Anacostia is a historic neighborhood in Washington, D.C. Its downtown is located at the intersection of Good Hope Road and Martin Luther King, Jr. Avenue. It is located east of the Anacostia River, after which the neighborhood is named. Like the other quadrants of Washington, D.C., Southeast encompasses a large number of named neighborhoods, of which Anacostia is the most well known. Anacostia includes all of the Anacostia Historic District that was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1978.

location

maps

Official Visitor Map of Civil War Defenses of Washington in District of Columbia, Maryland and Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Civil War Defenses of Washington - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Civil War Defenses of Washington in District of Columbia, Maryland and Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official Visitor Map of Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park (NHP) in Washington D.C., Maryland and West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Chesapeake & Ohio Canal - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park (NHP) in Washington D.C., Maryland and West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/anac/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anacostia Anacostia is a historic neighborhood in Washington, D.C. Its downtown is located at the intersection of Good Hope Road and Martin Luther King, Jr. Avenue. It is located east of the Anacostia River, after which the neighborhood is named. Like the other quadrants of Washington, D.C., Southeast encompasses a large number of named neighborhoods, of which Anacostia is the most well known. Anacostia includes all of the Anacostia Historic District that was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1978. Welcome to Anacostia Park, your neighborhood national park in the heart of Washington, DC! Enjoy exercise along the river trail or relax by the water, Anacostia Park is a breath of fresh air and a space to unwind amid a bustling city. Anacostia Park is located in South East Washington DC running parallel to the Anacostia river. The park can be accessed from the South Capitol bridge over the Anacostia river across from the Nationals baseball stadium. You can also enter the park from the Baltimore-Washington Parkway (295). You can enter the park from Good Hope Road or from Nicholson Street. Anacostia Drive Aerial view of Anacostia Drive and the playground Anacostia Drive and the Anacostia river Trail run along side the Anacostia river. Views of the Navy Yard and Nats. Stadium can be seen as across the river. Recreation at Anacostia A few men are playing basketball at Anacostia with the Anacostia River in the background. Anacostia is a great place for sports, including basketball and tennis courts. The Anacostia River Trail A view of the Anacostia River and a marina from the Anacostia River Trail. The Anacostia River trail is a wonderful paved trail that is great for biking, jogging and walking. The Anacostia Skating Pavilion A sidewalk approaches the Anacostia skating pavilion. The Anacostia skating pavilion is a great place to roller skate. It is an open-air rink that has a cover for rain and sun protection. Bring your dog to the park! A man jogs his two dogs along a paved multi-use trial. The Anacostia River trail is a great place to bring your dog for some exercise. Dogs must be on a leash and please clean up after your pet. Bonus Expeditionary Forces March on Washington In the depths of the Great Depression, a dramatic showdown between jobless WWI veterans, lawmakers, the police, and the Army played out in Washington, DC. Protesters and police clash in Washington, DC. Summer in the Parks (1968-1976) What began as a summer transportation program to send DC urban youth to Catoctin and Prince William Forest Parks in 1966 grew to a city-wide summer-long festival attracting residents to parks in every quadrant of the city. After the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., the program took on an additional role to help save a city from destroying itself. A group of boys smiles for the camera Crystal Clear: Anacostia Urban Waters Federal Partnership The Anacostia Urban Waters Partnership works with local stakeholder groups to understand their organizations and share how the federal agencies can support local goals and objectives. Children paddle in a canoe down a calm river. Links to the Past In the summer of 2016 the National Park Service began a study on the history and design of the National Park Service golf courses at East Potomac Park, Rock Creek Park, and Langston. The study will provides historical information and will be used as a planning tool for the ongoing management and public use of these golf courses. A man instructs boys in golf Cultural Landscapes and Community Well-Being: An Interview with ParkRx's Anne O'Neill The idea that spending time in green spaces can improve our health is not new. What if doctors prescribed activities in parks as a path to wellness? The Park Cultural Landscapes Program recently talked with Anne O'Neill, an Outdoor Recreation Planner for the NPS, about her work with the National ParkRx Initiative in Washington, DC. A group of individuals of varying ages do Zumba on a paved area of Meridian Hill Park. Ash Tree Update 2017 The state of ash trees in 2017 in the National Capital Region after more than 10 years of harm from the invasive emerald ash borer. A white ash leaf Oak Decline Learn more about oak decline where a host of stressors interact to weaken trees over time, leading to what becomes "death by a thousand cuts." Looking up into the canopy of a mature oak showing symptoms of oak decline. Forest Soils Highlights from a 2007-2017 study of soils in National Capital Region Network I&M-monitored parks. Includes discussion of parent materials, heavy metal soil pollutants like lead, and how past land use effects O horizons. Collage of 6 color photos of soil profiles showing colors from orange-y reds to browns and grays. Explore DC’s national parks with a new, free app Navigate to popular destinations, get up-to-date information and discover lesser-known parks. With nearly 800 points of interest, the app includes the National Mall, President's Park, Rock Creek Park, Anacostia Park, Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens, Wolf Trap, Arlington House, Theodore Roosevelt Island, Frederick Douglass NHS, Mary McLeod Bethune Council House NHS, Carter G. Woodson NHS, and hundreds more. National Park Service logo with Washington Monument and other memorials. Spotted Lanternfly 101 What you need to know about spotted lanternfly: a new, invasive, insect pest approaching the National Parks of the Mid-Atlantic. A spotted lanternfly with wings spread showing namesake spots Series: Crystal Clear: A Call to Action In 2016, the nation celebrates the centennial of the National Park Service (NPS) as the steward of special places that represent our natural and cultural heritage. Many national parks were founded on the beauty and value of water. Since the preservation of the Old Faithful Geyser in Yellowstone National Park in 1872, the National Park System has grown to include significant examples within majestic rivers, the Great Lakes, oceans and coasts, and other spectacular water resources. bright blue lake green islands in between Brood X Periodical Cicadas FAQ Learn about the Brood X periodical cicadas that emerged in 2021 throughout the Mid-Atlantic U.S. A perched periodical cicada with red eyes and orange wings Forest Regeneration 2020 What is the future of our forests? A look at forest regeneration capacity in National Capital Area national parks based on 2020 monitoring data. hand holding a leaflet on a white ash seedling National Capital Region PRISM and Invasive Species Since invasive species don’t recognize park boundaries, we need to work together with our partners, neighbors, and other federal and state entities to manage across borders. We can’t do it alone! a hand holds a rosette of green leaves over the water Sea Level Rise in the DC Area Learn about current and projected rates of sea level rise in the greater DC area, based on local water level data collected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) A tall white cylinder attached to a wooden pier with Hains Point in the background. Forest Regeneration 2021 The latest look at forest regeneration capacity in National Capital Area national parks based on monitoring data from 2021. Green forest showing healthy understory of oak seedlings. Ash Tree Update 2021 Emerald ash borer (EAB) has killed most of the 300,000 ash trees in National Capital Region parks since 2014. Fewer than 80,000 living ash trees remain. Some ash-dominated swamps transformed into shrublands as ash root systems re-sprouted after EAB attack. In dry habitats, EAB proved more quickly fatal. A sunny swamp with dead tree trunks emerging from dense shrubs Vines on Trees at Forest Edges Learn how climbing vines affect tree growth and mortality in National Capital Region park forests. This material was originally presented in a 2016 resource brief. Vines climb on trees at the forest edge at Rock Creek's Barnard Hill Park. The Modern Civil Rights Movement in the National Capital Area The national capital area’s everyday people contributed to the overall success of the modern Civil Rights Movement. From students to pastors, lawyers to teachers, parents and every-day people planned efforts between the 1950s to the 1960s to eliminate segregation and the discrimination. Civil Rights leaders surrounded by journalists and media. Malcolm X Day in Anacostia Park For over 23 years, May 19th was a tremendous day in Anacostia Park. To celebrate pioneering civil rights activist Malcom X’s birthday, tens of thousands of people would come to the park. They came to hear activists, artists, community leaders and more. Beginning in 1972, the message of the yearly event was to celebrate and create unity in the surrounding community. The events featured community organizing, art, music, and a general celebration of culture. people gather for Malcolm X Day Forest Regeneration 2022 Tree seedlings and small saplings are still in short supply in National Capital Region national parks. A look at forest regeneration capacity based on monitoring data from 2022. Sunlight filtering through a green forest with green seedlings covering most of the forest floor. Subsistence Fishing on the Potomac and Anacostia Subsistence fishing (where fishers keep what they catch) is an important use of parks in the greater Washington, DC area. Learn more about who these subsistence fishers are, what they're catching, and their motivations. Information presented comes from "Ethnographic Resource Study Subsistence Fishing on the Potomac and Anacostia Rivers" (2020). Color photo of a man holding a catfish, still attached to the hook, that he has just reeled in. Ash Tree Update 2022 Emerald ash borer are still decimating ash trees in the National Capital Region. Read on for the latest look into the state of ash trees in our parks based on forest monitoring data. Metallic emerald ash borer beetle atop a chewed leaf Series: A Timeline of Resistance: The Perseverance of African Americans from the Revolutionary War to the Civil Rights Era The story of African American’s fight for equality did not begin or end with the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s. In the National Capital Area, dedicated activism and self-determination has been documented since the Revolutionary War through the present day. This series consists of six articles that outline distinct timelines of resistance and activism in the fight for freedom. A young African American girl gazes at the camera holding a banner for the March on Washington Seep Shrimp Learn about the tiny creatures that live in our forest's seeps. three researchers in high-vis yellow gear search for shrimp in a snowy forest Forest Regeneration 2023 Tree seedlings and small saplings are slowly increasing in National Capital Region national parks. A look at forest regeneration capacity based on monitoring data from 2023. Three people stand in a forest, smiling and pointing to a large tree trunk between them. When Forests Come Down with a Bug: Forest Pests in the Greater DC Area Beech leaf disease, emerald ash borer, spotted lanternfly, spongy moth, oak decline and oak wilt are all pests present in National Capital Region (NCR) park forests. Learn about their effects and spread based on NCR Inventory & Monitoring data, and get the heads up on elm zigzag sawfly and beech bark disease. A black and red insect sits on a leaf.

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