"Hwy 90 Bridge" by Amistad NPS Archive , public domain

Amistad

National Recreation Area - Texas

Amistad National Recreation Area is a park unit managed by National Park Service (NPS) that includes the area around the Amistad Reservoir at the confluence of the Rio Grande, the Devils River, and the Pecos River near Del Rio in Val Verde County, Texas. The reservoir was created by the Amistad Dam (Presa de la Amistad in Spanish), completed in 1969, located on the Rio Grande at the United States-Mexico border across from the city of Ciudad Acuña in the Mexican state of Coahuila. Amistad, Spanish for "friendship," refers broadly to the close relationship and shared history between Ciudad Acuña and Del Rio.

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maps

Official Visitor Map of Amistad National Recreation Area (NRA) in Texas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Amistad - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Amistad National Recreation Area (NRA) in Texas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Detail of the official visitor map of Amistad National Recreation Area (NRA) in Texas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Amistad - Visitor Map Detail

Detail of the official visitor map of Amistad National Recreation Area (NRA) in Texas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official Texas Travel Map. Published by the Texas Department of Transportation.Texas - Travel Map

Official Texas Travel Map. Published by the Texas Department of Transportation.

https://www.nps.gov/amis/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amistad_National_Recreation_Area Amistad National Recreation Area is a park unit managed by National Park Service (NPS) that includes the area around the Amistad Reservoir at the confluence of the Rio Grande, the Devils River, and the Pecos River near Del Rio in Val Verde County, Texas. The reservoir was created by the Amistad Dam (Presa de la Amistad in Spanish), completed in 1969, located on the Rio Grande at the United States-Mexico border across from the city of Ciudad Acuña in the Mexican state of Coahuila. Amistad, Spanish for "friendship," refers broadly to the close relationship and shared history between Ciudad Acuña and Del Rio. An oasis in the desert, Amistad National Recreation Area consists of the US portion of the International Amistad Reservoir. Amistad, whose name comes from the Spanish word meaning friendship, is best known for excellent water-based recreation, camping, hiking, rock art viewing, and its rich cultural history. Amistad is also home to a wide variety of plant and animal life above and below the water. Amistad National Recreation Area is located on the US-Mexico border 7 miles west of the Del Rio city limit and 6 miles west of the US Highway 90 and 277 North intersection. The park is 160 miles west of San Antonio on US Highway 90 and about 230 miles east of Big Bend National Park via US Highway 90 and US Highway 385. Access to Amistad from the north or south is via US 277/377. The visitor center address is 10477 Highway 90 West, Del Rio, TX 78840. Amistad National Recreation Area Visitor Center The Visitor Center offers several park-related movies. _Transparent Border_ is the park's official movie about how the reservoir came to influence a relationship between the US city of Del Rio and Mexico's Ciudad Acuña. It is available in English and español and is 35 minutes long. The Visitor Center takes credit or debit card only and sells America the Beautiful National Park and Federal Lands passes, lake use passes, Amistad hunting permits, and camping permits. There is also a bookstore with souvenirs. The Visitor Center is six miles west of the Highway 90 and 277 North intersection. It is approximately 10 miles (15 minutes) from the heart of Del Rio, Texas, and 242 miles (4 hours 16 minutes) from Big Bend National Park. GPS Coordinates 29.466011, -100.988348 or Lat-Long: 29° 27' 57.6000" N 100° 59' 18.2796" W 277 North Campground 277 North Campground is generally open year-round and rarely fills up, except possibly on holiday weekends. A boat launch ramp off the campground may be available depending on lake levels. 277 North offers 17 primitive sites, which are first-come, first-served only. Each site has a covered picnic table and a BBQ grill. A group site is available with reservation only. No ground fires are allowed. The sites are suitable for tents or RVs. Vault toilets are available. No drinking water or hookups are available. 277 North Campground Standard Site, Nightly Rate (Regular) 6.00 Sites are available on a first-come, first-served basis; there are no reservations. Fee is payable within 30 minutes of occupying a campsite. This can be paid at a centrally located self-pay fee station, which accepts credit or debit cards only. Checkout time is 11am. 277 North Campground Standard Site, Nightly Rate (with Interagency Sr/Access Pass) 3.00 Sites are available on a first-come, first-served basis; there are no reservations. Fee is payable within 30 minutes of occupying a campsite. This can be paid at a centrally located self-pay fee station, which accepts credit or debit cards only. Checkout time is 11am. San Pedro Campground Group Site, Nightly Rate (Only with Recreation.gov Reservation) 35.00 One site available, reservation only. Fees charged on a tiered system as follows:1-15 people: $35.00, 16-35 people: $75.00, 36-75 people: $155.00. Make reservations on Recreation.gov no less than 3 days and no more than 180 days in advance. Check-out time is 11:00am. Quiet hours are from 10:00pm until 6:00am. No hook-ups. 277 North Campground 277 North Campground 277 North Campground 277 North Campground, Standard Campsite Picnic table under shade shelter. 277 North Campground, Standard Campsite 277 North Group Campsite Open space with a fire pit and covered picnic area for the group campsite. 227 North Campground Group Campsite Facilities 277 North Campground, Standard Site 1 Picnic table under metal shade shelter 277 North Campground, Standard Site 1 277 North Campground, Standard Site 2 Picnic table on cement pad under metal shade shelter 277 North Campground, Standard Site 2 277 North Campground, Standard Site 13 Picnic table on cement pad under shade shelter with BBQ grill 277 North Campground, Standard Site 13 Governors Landing Campground Governors Landing Campground is open year-round and rarely fills up, except possibly on holiday weekends. It is suitable for tents and RVs up to 28 feet in length. Governors Landing is the only campground in the park with potable water available, though there are no hookups. This campground has access to some of the most popular swimming areas in the park. Picnicking at vacant sites in Governors Landing Campground is allowed 7am to 3pm. Occupying sites outside these times requires payment of camping fees. Governors Landing Campground Standard Site, Nightly (Regular) 10.00 Sites are available on a first-come, first-served basis; there are no reservations. Fee is payable within 30 minutes of occupying a campsite. This can be paid at a centrally located self-pay fee station, which accepts credit or debit cards only. Checkout time is 11am. Governors Landing Campground Standard Site, Nightly (with Interagency Sr/Access Pass) 5.00 Sites are available on a first-come, first-served basis; there are no reservations. Fee is payable within 30 minutes of occupying a campsite. This can be paid at a centrally located self-pay fee station, which accepts credit or debit cards only. Checkout time is 11am. Arial view of Governors Landing Campground Arial view of Governors Landing Campground Arial view of Governors Landing Campground Governors Landing Campsite Governors Landing Campsite Governors Landing Campsite Rough Canyon Campground Rough Canyon Campground is generally open year-round and is in close proximity to a boat ramp. There may be a camp host on duty in the winter, and a Ranger Station is staffed intermittently. This campground offers 4 primitive sites, each with a covered picnic table and a BBQ grill. The sites are suitable for tents or RVs. No drinking water or hookups are available. Comfort station and running water available nearby at the Ranger Station. Rough Canyon Campground Standard Site, Nightly (Regular) 6.00 Sites are available on a first-come, first-served basis; there are no reservations. Fee is payable within 30 minutes of occupying a campsite. This can be paid at self-pay fee station near the boat ramp, which accepts credit or debit cards only. Checkout time is 11am. Rough Canyon Campground Standard Site, Nightly (with Interagency Sr/Access Pass) 3.00 Sites are available on a first-come, first-served basis; there are no reservations. Fee is payable within 30 minutes of occupying a campsite. This can be paid at self-pay fee station near the boat ramp, which accepts credit or debit cards only. Checkout time is 11am. Rough Canyon Campground Aerial view of Rough Canyon Campground surrounded by lake on three sides. Aerial view of Rough Canyon Campground Rough Canyon Campsite 1 Table under shade shelter with view of lake in background. Campsite 1 Rough Canyon Campsite 2 Picnic table under shade shelter next to fire grill with view of lake seen behind brushy vegetation. Campsite 2 Rough Canyon Campsite 3 Picnic table under the shade of a shelter with brushy vegetation in background. Campsite 3 Rough Canyon Campsite 4 Picnic table in the shade of a shelter and next to a fire grill with view of lake. Campsite 4 San Pedro Campground San Pedro Campground is open year-round and rarely fills to capacity. Of Amistad's campgrounds, it is the best suited for large RVs. This campground is accessed via a 1¼ mile graded, gravel road and offers 34 sites suitable for tents or RVs. There are also 8 walk-in (tent only) sites. Each site has a covered picnic table and a BBQ grill. Ground fires are prohibited. Vault toilets are available. No drinking water or hook-ups. San Pedro Campground Standard Site, Nightly (Regular) 6.00 Sites are available on a first-come, first-served basis; there are no reservations. Fee is payable within 30 minutes of occupying a campsite. This can be paid at a centrally located self-pay fee station, which accepts credit or debit cards only. Checkout time is 11am. San Pedro Campground Standard Site, Nightly (Interagency Sr/Access Pass) 3.00 Sites are available on a first-come, first-served basis; there are no reservations. Fee is payable within 30 minutes of occupying a campsite. This can be paid at a centrally located self-pay fee station, which accepts credit or debit cards only. Checkout time is 11am. San Pedro Campground Group Site, Nightly (Only with Recreation.gov Reservation) 35.00 One site available, reservation only. Fees charged on a tiered system as follows:1-15 people: $35.00, 16-35 people: $75.00, 36-75 people: $155.00. Make reservations on Recreation.gov no less than 3 days and no more than 180 days in advance. Check-out time is 11:00am. Quiet hours are from 10:00pm until 6:00am. No hook-ups. Arial view of San Pedro Campground Arial view of San Pedro Campground San Pedro Campground San Pedro Campsite Picnic table under shade shelter at San Pedro Campground One of the standard campsites at San Pedro Campground San Pedro Standard Campsite Covered picnic table, other campsites, trash receptacles, and vault toilet building in distance. A standard campsite in San Pedro Campground. Campsite at San Pedro Campground Campsite at San Pedro Campground San Pedro has RV drive up accessible campsites. Self Pay Fee station Self Pay Fee station Camping fee can be paid when you arrive to the site at the self pay station View of Boat Ramp from San Pedro Group Campsite View of boat ramp in distance from San Pedro Group Campsite. View of boat ramp in distance from San Pedro Group Campsite. San Pedro Group Campsite Meeting Area View of fire pit with several benches in a clearing. San Pedro Group Campsite Meeting Area San Pedro Group Campsite View of covered area with several tables under it. Shade-sheltered Picnic Table Area Spur 406 Campground Spur 406 Campground is generally open year-round and rarely fills up, except possibly on holiday weekends. It may close on occasion due to high water events. A boat launch ramp off the campground may be available depending on lake levels. This campground offers 6 primitive sites, each with a covered picnic table and a BBQ grill. No ground fires are allowed. The sites are suitable for tents or RVs. Vault toilets are available. No drinking water or hookups are available. Spur 406 Campground Standard Site, Nightly (Regular) 6.00 Sites are available on a first-come, first-served basis; there are no reservations. Fee is payable within 30 minutes of occupying a campsite. This can be paid at a centrally located self-pay fee station, which accepts credit or debit cards only. Checkout time is 11am. Spur 406 Campground Standard Site, Nightly (with Interagency Sr/Access Pass) 3.00 Sites are available on a first-come, first-served basis; there are no reservations. Fee is payable within 30 minutes of occupying a campsite. This can be paid at a centrally located self-pay fee station, which accepts credit or debit cards only. Checkout time is 11am. Spur 406 Campground Spur 406 Campground Spur 406 Campground Spur 406 Boat Ramp Long road to lake in distance with minimal vegetation to each side Spur 406 Boat Ramp Spur 406 Campground, Standard Campsite 1 Photo of picnic table under shade shelter Spur 406 Campground, Standard Campsite 1 Spur 406 Campground, Standard Campsite 2 Picnic table under a shade shelter with metal trash can. Spur 406 Campground, Standard Campsite 2 Spur 406 Campground, Standard Campsite 3 Picnic table in the open with metal trash can and bar-b-que grill nearby. Spur 406 Campground, Standard Campsite 3 Spur 406 Campground, Standard Campsite 4 Picnic table and bar-b-que grill under the shade of a shade shelter. Spur 406 Campground, Standard Campsite 4 Amistad Reservoir and Hwy 90 Bridge Sunset over Amistad Reservoir with Highway 90 bridge to left of photo going over the reservoir and i Enjoy the serenity of sunset at Amistad National Recreation Area's Governors Landing Day Use Area. View of Amistad National Recreation Area from The Diablo East Nature Trail Amistad National Recreation Area Blue skies and blue waters are common at Amistad National Recreation Area Under the HWY 90 Bridge Under the HWY 90 Bridge A view of the Amistad Reservoir and the HWY 90 Bridge from Governors Landing. The shoreline along Amistad National Recreation Area A view of the peaceful shoreline along Amistad National Recreation Area A peaceful view of the shores along Amistad National Recreation Area Sunset over Amistad National Recreation Area Sunset over Amistad National Recreation Area The ever chainging and beautiful sunsets in Southwest Texas are one of the many things visitor enjoy while at Amistad National Recreation Area. Limestone shoreline along Amistad National Recreation Area Limestone shoreline along Amistad National Recreation Area Limestone is visible along the shoreline of Amistad National Recreation Area. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Amistad National Recreation Area, Texas Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] lake side picnic shelter Amistad Vascular Plant Inventory In 2002, the Chihuahuan Desert Network supported a two-year inventory of the vascular plants in Amistad National Recreation Area by the Wildlife Diversity Program of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. Lake Amistad bordered by diverse vegetation communities Mammals of Amistad National Recreation Area Amistad National Recreation Area is positioned near the boundary of three biotic regions—Chihuahuan Desert, Edwards Plateau, and Tamaulipan Shrublands—and includes the confluences of the Rio Grande, the Pecos River, and the Devils River. Mammals have been studied both before and after the reservoir was constructed from the 1960s-1980s. However, no comprehensive mammalian inventory had been conducted within the park until this project. Ring-tailed cat in a tree Climate Change and the Chihuahuan Desert The Chihuahuan Desert Network is currently developing protocols to monitor several vital signs that may reflect current and future impacts of climate change. This brief offers a summary of how Chihuahuan Desert Network monitoring will detect future change. Smith Springs is one of many springs that serve as a water source for plants & animals in the CHDN. Amistad National Recreation Area Reptile and Amphibian Inventory Three major rivers (Pecos River, Devils River, and the Rio Grande) and the Amistad Reservoir occur in Amistad National Recreation Area (NRA). These diverse terrestrial and aquatic systems contribute to Amistad NRA’s high level of biodiversity. Searches for reptiles and amphibians were primarily focused along the eastern shore of the reservoir. Rio Grande leopard frog at the edge of shallow water Air Quality in the Chihuahuan Desert Three park units in the Chihuahuan Desert Network, Big Bend National Park (NP), Carlsbad Caverns NP, and Guadalupe Mountains NP are designated as Class I air quality areas under the Clean Air Act. Class I areas receive the highest protection under the act, and degradation of air quality must be minimal. Air quality concerns include atmospheric deposition effects and visibility impairment from fine particle haze. Rugged landscape under a partly cloudy sky at Big Bend National Park Amistad Bird Studies Amistad National Recreation Area and its surroundings are in a transitional zone between eastern, western, northern, and southern avifaunas, which provides the opportunity to see a wide variety of birds. Over 200 species of birds, both resident and migratory, have been documented at the recreation area. Painterly photo of an American avocet walking through shallow water Module Conducts Wildland-Urban Interface Projects Throughout the Intermountain Region In 2013, the Saguaro Wildland Fire Module (WFM) managed multiple projects simultaneously in AZ, TX, and NM. WFMs are highly skilled and versatile fire crews that provide expertise in long-term planning, ignitions, holding, prescribed fire preparation and implementation support, hazardous fuels reduction, and fire effects monitoring. With their help, fire fulfills its natural or historic role to meet resource and management objectives and create fire-adapted communities. Exotic Plants Monitoring in the Southern Plains and Chihuahuan Desert National parks, like other publicly managed lands, are deluged by new exotic species arriving through predictable (e.g., road, trail, and riparian corridors), sudden (e.g., long distance dispersal through cargo containers and air freight), and unexpected anthropogenic pathways (e.g., weed seeds mixed in with restoration planting mixes). Landscape with a uniform, green foreground consisting of invasive kochia Southwest River Environments In the arid Southwest, water means life, and prehistorically, rivers were the lifelines of the people. The Colorado River flowing through a canyon Southern Basin and Range The Southern Basin and Range is an extension of the Basin and Range Province centered on Nevada and the Great Basin and extending from southern Oregon to western Texas, and into northwest Mexico. Mountains and Desert in Guadalupe Mountains National Park Climate Monitoring in the Southern Plains, Sonoran Desert, and Chihuahuan Desert Climate is one of many ecological indicators monitored by the National Park Service (NPS) Division of Inventory & Monitoring (I&M). Climate data help scientists to understand ecosystem processes and help to explain many of the patterns and trends observed in other natural-resource monitoring. In NPS units of the American Southwest, three I&M networks monitor climate using the scientific protocol described here. Kayaking across a fl ooded parking lot, Chickasaw NRA, July 2007. Series: Climate and Water Resource Monitoring at Amistad National Recreation Area Climate and water dramatically shape ecosystems, especially in arid and semi-arid places like Amistad National Recreation Area (NRA) in Texas. The reservoir at the park receives drainage from water basins in the U.S. and Mexico, including the Rio Grande, and Pecos and Devils rivers. A wide variety of plants and animals live in the park because it is in a transition zone between major life and climate zones. We monitor climate and water at the park to assess the condition of park ecosystems. A large body of water viewed through a break in desert trees and shrubs. Series: Chihuahuan Desert Network Reptile and Amphibian Inventories In 2003 and 2004, the University of Arizona conducted an inventory of reptiles and amphibians (herpetofauna) in six National Park Service Chihuahuan Desert Network parks. Primary objectives of this inventory were to document reptile and amphibian species, map the distribution of all species found, and determine a rough relative abundance for each species. Trans-Pecos ratsnake Series: Defining the Southwest The Southwest has a special place in the American imagination – one filled with canyon lands, cacti, roadrunners, perpetual desert heat, a glaring sun, and the unfolding of history in places like Tombstone and Santa Fe. In the American mind, the Southwest is a place without boundaries – a land with its own style and its own pace – a land that ultimately defies a single definition. Maize agriculture is one component of a general cultural definition of the Southwest. A Paleontological Survey at Amistad National Recreation Area: Swimming in the Mesozoic and Hunting in the Quaternary Paleontologist Christy Visaggi reflects on the fossil record preserved at Amistad National Recreation Area. three fossil snails Changing Patterns of Water Availability May Change Vegetation Composition in US National Parks Across the US, changes in water availability are altering which plants grow where. These changes are evident at a broad scale. But not all areas experience the same climate in the same way, even within the boundaries of a single national park. A new dataset gives park managers a valuable tool for understanding why vegetation has changed and how it might change in the future under different climate-change scenarios. Green, orange, and dead grey junipers in red soil, mountains in background Climate and Water Monitoring at Amistad National Recreation Area Climate and water dramatically shape ecosystems, especially in arid and semi-arid places like Amistad National Recreation Area (NRA) in Texas. The reservoir at the park receives drainage from water basins in the U.S. and Mexico, including the Pecos and Devils rivers and the Rio Grande. The park supports a wide variety of plants and animals because it is in a transition zone between major life and climate zones. We monitor climate and water to assess park ecosystems. A blue lake viewed from between prickly shrubs on a rocky embankment. Series: Park Paleontology News - Vol. 13, No. 2, Fall 2021 All across the park system, scientists, rangers, and interpreters are engaged in the important work of studying, protecting, and sharing our rich fossil heritage. <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/newsletters.htm">Park Paleontology news</a> provides a close up look at the important work of caring for these irreplaceable resources. <ul><li>Contribute to Park Paleontology News by contacting the <a href="https://www.nps.gov/common/utilities/sendmail/sendemail.cfm?o=5D8CD5B898DDBB8387BA1DBBFD02A8AE4FBD489F4FF88B9049&r=/subjects/geoscientistsinparks/photo-galleries.htm">newsletter editor</a></li><li>Learn more about <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/">Fossils & Paleontology</a> </li><li>Celebrate <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossilday/">National Fossil Day</a> with events across the nation</li></ul> fossil skull on display outdoors Making an Impact: Long-Term Monitoring of Natural Resources at Intermountain Region National Parks, 2021 Across the Intermountain Region, Inventory & Monitoring Division ecologists are helping to track the effects of climate change, provide baseline information for resource management, evaluate new technologies, and inspire the next generation of park stewards. This article highlights accomplishments achieved during fiscal year 2021. A man looks through binoculars at sunrise. Aquatic Invasive Species Join Ranger Kierra as she shares about the crucial roles that Mussel Dogs; Clean, Drain, Dry; education; early detection; and you play in preventing aquatic invasive species invasions at Amistad National Recreation Area and other parks and waterways. Biology Technician Kierra Christy and friends talk about AIS. From Buffalo Soldier to Bath Attendant: The Story of Hugh Hayes and Hot Springs National Park Learn about the life of Hugh Hayes, an African American man from Tennessee, and how his life as a Buffalo Soldier and bath attendant at Hot Springs National Park connected him to significant moments in American history. African American man wearing a white shirt and tie sits in a wooden chair

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